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Lets say I have a class

public class Base {}

and a child class

public class Derived extends Base {

    public void Foo(Object i){
        System.out.println("derived - object");
    }
}

and main class

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Derived d = new Derived();
        int i = 5;
        d.Foo(i);
    }
}

In console we will see derived - object

Some time later I want to modify my superclass like this :

public class Base {

    public void Foo(int i) {
        System.out.println("base - int");
    }
}

Now if I run my programm I will see:

base - int

So can I make a method in superclass not avaliable in my child class? In result I want to see derived - object.

I see some don't understand what I want so I'll try to explain:

I want to modify only superclass and I don't want to modify my child class.. for example if I will make jar with my superclass and jar with my childs. I don't want to change all jars.. I want to add method into superclass and make it avaliable for superclass.. And such code

    public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Derived d = new Derived();
        int i = 5;
        d.Foo(i);
        Base b = new Base();
        b.Foo(i);
    }
}

give me

derived - object base - int

share|improve this question
    
I know that c++ and c# have somy features that help to resolve such problem, but I do not know how make it in java –  Aleksei Bulgak Aug 15 '12 at 7:08
1  
You might want to have a look at this post: [SO: stackoverflow.com/questions/2589146/…; [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/2589146/… –  Manuzor Aug 15 '12 at 7:09
    
Using @Override annotation might also help so you know during compile time that you are actually overriding a base method. –  Adrian M Aug 15 '12 at 8:04
    
Now you try to struggle against overriding/overloading, inheritance and boxing/unboxing. Generally this is a bad idea. You can try to discover Java language specification for complete understanding how compilator make decision about what exact method it should use. Maybe you can solve your problem somehow, but if you do it your API will be very complicated for understanding. –  gkuzmin Aug 15 '12 at 8:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use following signature for Foo method in base class:

public void Foo(Object i) {
    System.out.println("base - int");
}

This way you can override method Foo from base class. Now you do not override this method but overload it instead.

If you want to use public void Foo(int i) signature in your base class then you can define Foo method in base class as private.

PS: I hope that I've understood you.

share|improve this answer
    
but if I make it private I can not write like this Base base = new Base; base.foo(5); –  Aleksei Bulgak Aug 15 '12 at 7:16
1  
if you want to always be able to override you should use this : public void Foo(Object... i) it shall capture everything –  TecHunter Aug 15 '12 at 7:17
    
@Aleksei if a child can't access at compile time I can't see any way to make external classes access it. You want to block close scope while allowing larger scope. This can only be done by overriding the method and throwing an exception for accessviolation or something –  TecHunter Aug 15 '12 at 7:21
  • private members are limited to the class scope.
  • default (no keyword for this one) are limited to other members of the same package.
  • protected are limited to hierarchy.
  • public are not limited.

So if you don't want your child class to access a member of the superclass (member means methods, enum, variables ...) you should declare your foo like this :

public class Base {

    private void Foo(int i) {
        System.out.println("base - int");
    }
}

Edit from my comment : if you dont want child class to access a parent's member at compile time I can't see any way to still allow external classes to access it. You want to block access from close scope while allowing broader scope. This can only be done by overriding the method and throwing an exception for accessviolation or something which is not at compile time but at runtime. Although you could make it work with a custom annotations but I don't know how to do this.

share|improve this answer

You can make a method final, which means, that the child class cannot override it.

If you do not do that and the child class overrides the method, you cannot call the super classes method from your main.

A Convention note: Please use lowercase method names in java.

share|improve this answer
    
when I make my foo method final in superclass and run the programm I see "base - int". So I think that my child class overrides the method(( –  Aleksei Bulgak Aug 15 '12 at 7:14
package com.abc;


public class TestParentChild {

    public static void main(String[] asd) {
        Base b = new ChildB();
        b.foo(5);
    }
}

class Base {
    public void foo(int i) {
        System.out.println("derived - int");
    }

}

class ChildB extends Base {
    public void foo(int i) {
        System.out.println("derived - object");
    }
}

This might help you

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