Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Find best suitable time from given time interval of different users.

Rows: 5
fid  userid  FromDateTime           ToDateTime          flag
62   1   2012-07-18 01:48:20    2012-07-18 02:55:20     1
63   1   2012-07-18 10:30:46    2012-07-18 12:54:46     1
64   1   2012-07-18 18:50:24    2012-07-18 20:35:24     1
67   1   2012-07-18 15:03:36    2012-07-18 16:03:36     1
68   2   2012-07-18 21:10:47    2012-07-18 23:10:47     1

Above table show different free timesperiods available for different user, for examaple:

user1 is free in

2012-07-18 01:48:20   to   2012-07-18 02:55:20 , 
2012-07-18 10:30:46   to   2012-07-18 12:54:46 
......

user 2 is only free between this time period:

2012-07-18 21:10:47   to   2012-07-18 23:10:47 

Now I want to find out one best time interval in which both user can schedule their meeting.

share|improve this question
2  
Welcome to SO! ...What have you tried yourself? =) –  J. Steen Aug 15 '12 at 7:24
2  
You have to define the logic behind "best". –  Prasad Rajapaksha Aug 15 '12 at 7:26
    
Obviously, the best time is anything after MAX(ToDateTime) :) –  Jack Aug 15 '12 at 7:34
    
I know i have to define the logic , but what should be the logic ? –  Hemant Agrawal Aug 15 '12 at 7:43
    
do you meant to find when both user1 and user2 are free? –  sel Aug 15 '12 at 8:22
show 3 more comments

5 Answers

To find when both user1 and user2 are free, please try below:

select 
a.datetime_start as user1start,a.datetime_end as user1end,
b.datetime_start as user2start,b.datetime_end as user2end ,
case when a.datetime_start > b.datetime_start then a.datetime_start 
   else b.datetime_start end as avail_start,
case when a.datetime_end>b.datetime_end then b.datetime_end 
   else a.datetime_end end as avail_end
from users a inner join users b on
a.datetime_start<=b.datetime_end and a.datetime_end>=b.datetime_start     
and  a.userid={user1} and b.userid={user2}

SQL FIDDLE HERE.

EDITED: For comparing more than 2 users,pls try below:

select max(datetime_start) as avail_start,min(datetime_end) as avail_end
from(
        select *,
        @rn := CASE WHEN @prev_start <=datetime_end and @prev_end >=datetime_start THEN @rn ELSE @rn+1 END AS rn,
        @prev_start := datetime_start,
        @prev_end := datetime_end 
        from(
          select * from users2 m
          where exists ( select null 
                          from users2 o 
                           where o.datetime_start <= m.datetime_end and o.datetime_end >= m.datetime_start
                           and o.id <> m.id 
                        ) 
             and m.userid in (2,4,3,5)
           order by m.datetime_start) t,
           (SELECT @prev_start := -1, @rn := 1, @prev_end=-1) AS vars 
) c 
group by rn 
having count(rn)=4 ;

Need to change m.userid in (2,4,3,5) and having count(rn)=4 according to number of users.

SQL FIDDLE HERE

share|improve this answer
    
thank u so much .. great solution. But this is only between 2 users i can find... and my requirement is to find between more than 2 users. it can be 2 or 3 or 5 ..... number of users are not fixed –  Hemant Agrawal Aug 15 '12 at 9:11
    
@HemantAgrawal, Edited my answer for more than 2 users scenario.Pls try.If the answer is helpful, please do accept the answer. thanks. –  sel Aug 16 '12 at 8:21
    
Thank u so much.. SEL . but i really sorry that i am not getting any result. –  Hemant Agrawal Aug 16 '12 at 10:11
    
in my table 3 different users exists. User1 have 3 different freetimes available , user2 and user3 have entry of only one free times. When i remove having clause from query i can see that result return with 4 different records. But with having clause result is empty. –  Hemant Agrawal Aug 16 '12 at 10:42
    
I think having clause like 'having rn=4' not count(rn). I do this change. now i am having result but it's not true. First query u have posted for 2 users only gives me perfect result. But this same query for 2 user don't give right result. both querys result are different. –  Hemant Agrawal Aug 16 '12 at 11:02
show 2 more comments

You can use this solution to find the "best" time window in which ALL users in your criteria (let's say userids 1-5) can meet. The "best" time window is measured by the greatest amount of seconds.

SELECT   MAX(b.FromDateTime) FromDateTime, 
         a.ToDateTime
FROM     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.ToDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid     <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.ToDateTime >  b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.ToDateTime <= b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) a
JOIN     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.FromDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid       <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.FromDateTime >= b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.FromDateTime <  b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) b ON b.FromDateTime < a.ToDateTime
GROUP BY a.ToDateTime
ORDER BY TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, MAX(b.FromDateTime), a.ToDateTime) DESC
LIMIT    1

The 4 after COUNT(DISTINCT... is just the number of users in your criteria minus one (since user's are prevented from joining onto themselves). Adjust accordingly.

What we should be returned with is the start and end time of the meeting in which all users can attend.


Query Breakdown


Given the following data:

(62, 1, '2012-07-18 00:00:00', '2012-07-18 12:00:00', 1),

(63, 2, '2012-07-18 00:00:00', '2012-07-18 02:00:00', 1),
(64, 2, '2012-07-18 03:00:00', '2012-07-18 05:00:00', 1),
(65, 2, '2012-07-18 05:30:00', '2012-07-18 06:00:00', 1),

(66, 3, '2012-07-18 00:30:00', '2012-07-18 02:30:00', 1),
(67, 3, '2012-07-18 03:10:00', '2012-07-18 07:30:00', 1),

(68, 4, '2012-07-18 01:10:00', '2012-07-18 03:20:00', 1),
(69, 4, '2012-07-18 03:50:00', '2012-07-18 06:00:00', 1),

(70, 5, '2012-07-18 01:10:00', '2012-07-18 03:20:00', 1),
(71, 5, '2012-07-18 04:30:00', '2012-07-18 07:10:00', 1),


(72, 1, '2012-07-18 13:00:00', '2012-07-18 14:00:00', 1),
(73, 2, '2012-07-18 13:30:00', '2012-07-18 14:30:00', 1),
(74, 3, '2012-07-18 14:00:00', '2012-07-18 15:00:00', 1),
(75, 4, '2012-07-18 14:30:00', '2012-07-18 15:30:00', 1),
(76, 5, '2012-07-18 18:00:00', '2012-07-18 19:00:00', 1);

The relative time interval positions should look like the following textual illustration (will have to sidescroll to see it all):

uid 1   <--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------...-------->      <-------------------->
uid 2   <----------------------->          <----------------------->    <---->                                          <-------------------->
uid 3       <----------------------->       <------------------------------------------->                                       <-------------------->
uid 4                 <----------------------->      <----------------------->                                                         <-------------------->
uid 5                 <----------------------->              <----------------------->                                                                                              <-------------------->
                      [    1    ]           [2]              [  3  ]    [ 4  ]
                           ^
       We want the start and end times of this overlap

The numbers in between the brackets [ ] represent the time window in which all users' free-times overlap. We want overlap #1 since it is the longest. Overlap #1 should be 2012-07-18 1:10:00 to 2012-07-18 2:00:00, so our expected result should be:

FromDateTime       | ToDateTime
----------------------------------------
2012-07-18 1:10:00 | 2012-07-18 2:00:00

Step 1:

The first thing we must do is figure out what the end-times are of all potential meeting windows. We do this by selecting those particular intervals in which their end-times are in between all other users' free-time intervals.

The end-times returned represent the end-times of each overlap pointed out in the textual illustration above. If there are two of the same end-times returned, we only pick one since we don't need to know anything else about that end-time other than the fact that it is the latest time that that particular meeting can go until:

SELECT   DISTINCT a.ToDateTime
FROM     tbl a
JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid     <> b.userid
              AND a.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
              AND b.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
              AND a.ToDateTime >  b.FromDateTime 
              AND a.ToDateTime <= b.ToDateTime
GROUP BY a.userid,
         a.FromDateTime,
         a.ToDateTime
HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4

Renders:

TODATETIME
-------------------
2012-07-18 02:00:00
2012-07-18 05:00:00
2012-07-18 06:00:00
2012-07-18 03:20:00

SQLFiddle Demo


Step 2:

The next thing we will have to do is take the reverse of the last step and figure out all of the start-times of each potential meeting window, and join the result of this query with the result of the previous step on the condition that the start time is less than the previous step's end-time:

SELECT   b.FromDateTime,
         a.ToDateTime
FROM     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.ToDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid     <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.ToDateTime >  b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.ToDateTime <= b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) a
JOIN     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.FromDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid       <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.FromDateTime >= b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.FromDateTime <  b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) b ON b.FromDateTime < a.ToDateTime
ORDER BY a.ToDateTime, b.FromDateTime --Ordered for display purposes

Renders:

TODATETIME          | FROMDATETIME        
------------------------------------------
2012-07-18 02:00:00 | 2012-07-18 01:10:00  <-- Most recent FromDateTime
2012-07-18 03:20:00 | 2012-07-18 01:10:00 
2012-07-18 03:20:00 | 2012-07-18 03:10:00  <-- Most recent FromDateTime
2012-07-18 05:00:00 | 2012-07-18 01:10:00 
2012-07-18 05:00:00 | 2012-07-18 03:10:00 
2012-07-18 05:00:00 | 2012-07-18 04:30:00  <-- Most recent FromDateTime 
2012-07-18 06:00:00 | 2012-07-18 01:10:00 
2012-07-18 06:00:00 | 2012-07-18 03:10:00 
2012-07-18 06:00:00 | 2012-07-18 04:30:00 
2012-07-18 06:00:00 | 2012-07-18 05:30:00  <-- Most recent FromDateTime 

The most recent FromDateTimes represent the start of each potential meeting window. We only want to pull the rows where FromDateTime is most recent per ToDateTime. We do this in the next step using GROUP BY in conjunction with the MAX() aggregate function.

SQLFiddle Demo


Step 3:

Next, we use GROUP BY on ToDateTime and MAX() on FromDateTime to pull only the most recent FromDateTimes:

SELECT   MAX(b.FromDateTime) FromDateTime, 
         a.ToDateTime
FROM     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.ToDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid     <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.ToDateTime >  b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.ToDateTime <= b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) a
JOIN     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.FromDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid       <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.FromDateTime >= b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.FromDateTime <  b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) b ON b.FromDateTime < a.ToDateTime
GROUP BY a.ToDateTime

Renders:

FROMDATETIME        | TODATETIME
-----------------------------------------
2012-07-18 01:10:00 | 2012-07-18 02:00:00
2012-07-18 03:10:00 | 2012-07-18 03:20:00
2012-07-18 04:30:00 | 2012-07-18 05:00:00
2012-07-18 05:30:00 | 2012-07-18 06:00:00

These are basically our potential time-windows. Now it's just a simple matter of selecting the longest one.


Step 4:

We use the ORDER BY / LIMIT 1 max/min selection technique since we only need one row. We order based on the seconds-difference between the end-time and start-time of each meeting, then select the one with the greatest amount of seconds (via LIMIT 1), giving us our final desired result:

SELECT   MAX(b.FromDateTime) FromDateTime, 
         a.ToDateTime
FROM     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.ToDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid     <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid     IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.ToDateTime >  b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.ToDateTime <= b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) a
JOIN     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.FromDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid       <> b.userid
                       AND a.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND b.userid       IN (1,2,3,4,5)
                       AND a.FromDateTime >= b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.FromDateTime <  b.ToDateTime
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = 4
         ) b ON b.FromDateTime < a.ToDateTime
GROUP BY a.ToDateTime
ORDER BY TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, MAX(b.FromDateTime), a.ToDateTime) DESC
LIMIT    1

SQLFiddle Demo of Final Result

SQLFiddle Demo with Other Example Data


Getting the meeting time between all users in the table (no criteria):

If you don't want to specify which users you want to check meeting-times for (just do it for all users in the table), you can use:

SELECT   MAX(b.FromDateTime) FromDateTime, 
         a.ToDateTime
FROM     (
         SELECT     DISTINCT a.ToDateTime
         FROM       tbl a
         JOIN       tbl b ON a.userid     <> b.userid
                         AND a.ToDateTime >  b.FromDateTime 
                         AND a.ToDateTime <= b.ToDateTime
         CROSS JOIN (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT userid) totalusers FROM tbl) c
         GROUP BY   a.userid,
                    a.FromDateTime,
                    a.ToDateTime,
                    c.totalusers
         HAVING     COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = c.totalusers-1
         ) a
JOIN     (
         SELECT   DISTINCT a.FromDateTime
         FROM     tbl a
         JOIN     tbl b ON a.userid       <> b.userid
                       AND a.FromDateTime >= b.FromDateTime 
                       AND a.FromDateTime <  b.ToDateTime
         CROSS JOIN (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT userid) totalusers FROM tbl) c
         GROUP BY a.userid,
                  a.FromDateTime,
                  a.ToDateTime,
                  c.totalusers
         HAVING   COUNT(DISTINCT b.userid) = c.totalusers-1
         ) b ON b.FromDateTime < a.ToDateTime
GROUP BY a.ToDateTime
ORDER BY TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, MAX(b.FromDateTime), a.ToDateTime) DESC
LIMIT    1
share|improve this answer
    
An elegant solution implementation that returns the largest pair-wise free times. But the intersection of time for all users won't necessarily be these results. Suppose everyone is free from 12:00 to 12:15, user1 and user2 are free from 1:00 to 2:00, user3 and user4 are free from 3:00 to 4:00, etc. The time interval starting at 12:00 won't be included in your results. :( –  EthanB Aug 26 '12 at 20:15
    
@EthanB, I'm not sure if I quite fully understand. I just tested with your data and the results are as expected. See sqlfiddle.com/#!2/0a172/2 - that's with the non-duplicate solution. User's 1 and 2 meet from 1:00 to 2:00. Yes, they can meet from 12:00 to 12:15, but that is excluded from the result for userids 1 and 2 because that's not the largest time window: 1:00-2:00 is. Likewise for userids 3 and 4. Perhaps the OP wants to find the best meeting time per day? Since the only overlapping interval between 1 and 3,4 is 12:00-12:15, that interval joins. –  Zane Bien Aug 26 '12 at 20:53
    
OP wants to be able to see best meeting times for more than 2 users. –  EthanB Aug 26 '12 at 21:05
    
@EthanB, Okay, so not just multiple pairs at the same time, but rather the timeframe in which all users can meet at the same time. Got it. –  Zane Bien Aug 26 '12 at 21:36
    
@ZaneBien, as indicated by ethanB, OP want to find the common overlapping time for more than 2 users. –  sel Aug 27 '12 at 1:42
show 3 more comments

I created a 1D line-segment intersection algorithm in PHP utilizing a sweep line (Wikipedia). It works because datetimes can be mapped to a number-line: for example using "milliseconds since epoch".

See the implementation here: http://pastebin.com/iLwJQEF0

The algorithm outputs an array of line-segment intersections (which are also line-segments) that also have a list of all the users available for the duration. You can sort the intersections by your definition of "best" (and reverse it for descending): first by the number of available users and then by their durations. (Already implemented!)

It runs in O(n * log n), where n is the number of time-periods.

Notes:

  • If you don't want to mess around with datetime-to-millisecond conversions, you can replace the subtract and greater-than/less-than operators. (I left some comments for you.)
  • It is important to watch out for line-segments that start/end at the same place:
    • The sweep-line must encounter end-points before start-points of the same value.
    • Also notice that it won't create extraneous results when two line-segments end at the same value.
  • I'm sure this can be re-implemented inside a database engine (if you think it's worth it). A number of database vendors have geometric extensions.
share|improve this answer
add comment

I have found a hacky way to do this :

Perl has some thing called Set::IntSpan which has a intersect function(or method) that will find a range common to two intervals of numbers. The idea is to make use of it.

You can convert date time strings to timestamp(numbers) using strtotime("2012-08-27 02:02:02") in php. Once you have two pairs of timestamps, you can use the following sample perl code to find the intersection interval from which you can find the time.

use Set::IntSpan;

my $r1 = Set::IntSpan->new([ 5 .. 15 ]);
my $r2 = Set::IntSpan->new([ 2 .. 20 ]);

my $i = $r1->intersect($r2);

if ( !$i->empty and ( $i->max - $i->min ) >= 5 ) # criteria
{
print "hit\n"; # $i->max, $i->min are the timestamps you need
}
else
{
print "miss\n";
}

once you have the intersecting interval, you can get back the date time from timestamp (if you need) using date("Y-m-d H:i:s", $timestamp);

Here are some related links and references:

Calculate overlap between 2 ranges of numbers

Calling Perl script from PHP and passing in variables, while also using variablized perl script name

p.s. perhaps perl pros can wrap up the code into a function with 4 arguments? also, i understand this isn't the perfect answer to the question but imo the idea is cool.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Using sel's schema from the fiddle (10x sel)...

The simplest way too do this is:

SELECT
    MAX(GREATEST(u1.datetime_start, u2.datetime_start)) AS MeetingStart,
    MIN(LEAST(u1.datetime_end, u2.datetime_end)) AS MeetingEnd
FROM users2 u1
INNER JOIN users2 u2
    ON (u1.datetime_end >= u2.datetime_start AND u1.datetime_start <= u2.datetime_end)
    AND u2.userid != u1.userid
    AND u2.userid IN (3,4,5)
WHERE u1.userid=2
GROUP BY u1.id
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT u2.userid) = 3 AND MeetingStart < MeetingEnd

Change according to your situation:

In my example we have 4 participants. n=4, participants (2,3,4,5)

IN (3,4,5) --> last n-1 id's of participants to the meeting

WHERE u1.userid=2 --> id for the first participant to the meeting

HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT u2.userid) = 3 --> n - 1

Can be tested on sqlfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
I try your sqlfiddle with IN (2,4,5) and IN (2,3,4,5), it does not return the desired result. –  sel Aug 27 '12 at 1:32
    
hmm.. did you change all the params accordingly? IN, WHERE and HAVING? –  kcsoft Aug 27 '12 at 7:53
    
My mistake. your solution do works. But the solution do not work with this test data. sqlfiddle.com/#!2/23e55/1 i modify to ('4', '2012-08-01 17:00:00', ' 2012-08-01 19:00:00 ') and add in ('4', '2012-08-01 19:10:00', ' 2012-08-01 20:00:00 '). the result return do not include 2012-08-01. –  sel Aug 27 '12 at 8:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.