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I went from this: WPF GridViewHeader styling questions

to this:

WPF GridView Headers

Now I just need to get rid of the white space to the right of the "Size" header. I basically have a template for the GridViewColumnHeader that makes it a TextBlock. Is there any way I can set the background for that header area so that it spans the entire width of the GridView?

ADDED CODE:

This is my right-most column. The grid does not span 100% of available window area. In the header I need everything to the right of this column to have the same background as the column headers themselves.

<Style x:Key="GridHeaderRight" TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}">
                <Setter Property="Template">
                    <Setter.Value>
                        <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}">
                            <TextBlock Text="{TemplateBinding Content}" Padding="5" Width="{TemplateBinding Width}" TextAlignment="Right">
                                <TextBlock.Background>
                                    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="0,1">
                                        <GradientStop Offset="0.0" Color="#373638" />
                                        <GradientStop Offset="1.0" Color="#77797B" />
                                    </LinearGradientBrush>
                                </TextBlock.Background>
                            </TextBlock>
                        </ControlTemplate>
                    </Setter.Value>
                </Setter>
                <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="True" />
                <Setter Property="Background" Value="Green" />
                <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="White" />
                <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="12" />
                <Setter Property="Background">
                    <Setter.Value>
                        <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="0,1">
                            <GradientStop Offset="0.0" Color="#373638" />
                            <GradientStop Offset="1.0" Color="#77797B" />
                        </LinearGradientBrush>
                    </Setter.Value>
                </Setter>
            </Style>

<GridViewColumn Width="200" HeaderContainerStyle="{ StaticResource GridHeaderRight}" Header="Size">
                            <GridViewColumn.CellTemplate>
                                <DataTemplate>
                                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=EmployeeNumber}" HorizontalAlignment="Right"></TextBlock>
                                </DataTemplate>
                            </GridViewColumn.CellTemplate>
                        </GridViewColumn>

UPDATE

I am one step closer (I think) to solving this.

I added the following code inside the GridView tag:

<GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle>
    <Style TargetType="GridViewColumnHeader">
        <Setter Property="BorderThickness" Value="1"></Setter>
        <Setter Property="BorderBrush" Value="Green"></Setter>
        <Setter Property="Height" Value="Auto"></Setter>
        <Setter Property="Background">
            <Setter.Value>
                <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="0,1">
                    <GradientStop Offset="0.0" Color="#373638" />
                    <GradientStop Offset="1.0" Color="#77797B" />
                </LinearGradientBrush>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle>

The border is there just so you can see the boundary of what this style covers. This is an enlarged image of what this does. It seems to be what I want if I can get rid of the little white border on the bottom.

So I guess removing that tiny white bottom border would also be an accepted answer for this one.

ColumnHeaderContainerStyle

share|improve this question
1  
It will probably help to post your existing code/xaml. – Simon P Stevens Jul 28 '09 at 20:43
    
I added some code now. – djschwartz Jul 29 '09 at 12:49

Have a look at the GridViewColumnHeader.Role property. The sample in the documentation for the GridViewColumnHeaderRole enumeration might give you some ideas...

EDIT: Have you considered using the GridView.HeaderStyle property ?

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how the readonly Role property will help me style the whole header row. – djschwartz Jul 29 '09 at 12:50
    
It won't, but it can probably let you style the "dummy" column header with role "Padding" Anyway, I just got another idea, see my updated answer – Thomas Levesque Jul 29 '09 at 12:53
    
I did consider using GridView.HeaderStyle - because I'm used to doing ASP.NET work. This is in WPF and there doesn't seem to be (according to VS intellisense) any GridView.HeaderStyle. I'll check it out to make sure though. – djschwartz Jul 29 '09 at 13:22
    
Oops sorry, I didn't see I was looking at the ASP.NET GridView... – Thomas Levesque Jul 29 '09 at 13:56

I solved this issue but I think there should be a better way of doing it. The problem was that I had TextBlocks on the header of each column. The unused area didn't have anything on the header row. I just added a TextBlock with the same background in the GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle and it happened to span the rest of the unused width of the grid.

<GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle>
    <Style TargetType="GridViewColumnHeader">
    	<Setter Property="Template">
    		<Setter.Value>
    			<ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}">
    				<TextBlock Text="" Padding="5">
    					<TextBlock.Background>
    						<LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="0,1">
    							<GradientStop Offset="0.0" Color="#373638" />
    							<GradientStop Offset="1.0" Color="#77797B" />
    						</LinearGradientBrush>
    					</TextBlock.Background>
    				</TextBlock>
    			</ControlTemplate>
    		</Setter.Value>
    	</Setter>
    </Style>
</GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle>
share|improve this answer

This is a simple style that will accomplish what you are looking for. Just change the Transparent background on the Border to be your desired gradient.

    <Style TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}">
        <Setter Property="Template">
            <Setter.Value>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}">
                    <Border BorderThickness="0,0,0,1" BorderBrush="Black" Background="Transparent">
                        <TextBlock x:Name="ContentHeader" Text="{TemplateBinding Content}" Padding="5,5,5,0" Width="{TemplateBinding Width}" TextAlignment="Center" />
                    </Border>
                </ControlTemplate>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
        <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="True" />
        <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="Black" />
        <Setter Property="FontFamily" Value="Segoe UI" />
        <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="12" />
    </Style>
share|improve this answer

The background and border brush of the empty space at the right of columns can be changed by styling the ColumnHeaderContainerStyle of GridViewHeaderRowPresenter, like described here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.controls.gridviewheaderrowpresenter(v=VS.85).aspx

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I'm not sure if I understood your question (Image links are dead) but sometimes the simplest way is the best.

Define something like this in Resources:

<Style TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}}">
    <Setter Property="TextBlock.TextWrapping" Value="Wrap"/>
    <Setter Property="TextBlock.Foreground" Value="Black"/>
</Style>
share|improve this answer

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