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This question might go closer to pattern matching in image processing.

Is there any way to get a cost function value, applied on different lists, which will return the inter-list proximity? For example,

a = [4, 7, 9]
b = [5, 8, 10]
c = [2, 3]

Now the cost function value for, may be a 2-tuple, (a, b) should be more than (a, c) and (b, c). This can be a huge computational task since there can be many more number of lists and all permutations would blow up the complexity of the problem. So only the set of 2-tuples would work as well.

EDIT: The list names indicate the type of actions, and elements in them are the time at which corresponding actions occur. What I'm trying to do is to come up with set(s) of actions which have similar occurrence pattern. Since two actions cannot occur at the same time, it's the combination of intra- and inter-list distance.

Thanks in advance!

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3 Answers 3

You're asking a very difficult question. Without allowing the sizes to change there are already several distance measures you could use (Euclidean, Manhattan, etc, check the See Also section for more). The one you need depends on what you think a good measure of the proximity is for whatever these lists represent.

Without knowing what you're trying to do with these lists no-one can define what a good answer would be, let alone how to compute it efficiently.

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Michael, I understand what you mean. Basically, the lists indicate the type of actions, and elements in them are the time at which corresponding actions occur. What I'm trying to do is to come up with set(s) of actions which have similar occurrence pattern. But no two actions can happen at the same time, hence it's the combination of intra- and inter-list distance. –  RLOA Aug 15 '12 at 11:18
    
@RLOA: You should really edit this comment into your question. –  Roland Smith Aug 15 '12 at 11:31
    
Done. Hope it is not confusing. –  RLOA Aug 15 '12 at 13:02
    
So would 2, 4, 8 be similar to 3, 5, 9? If so, what would be its distances to 12, 14, 18, 26 and 12, 14, 18, 19? Is there some transformation you can apply to the data to make it easier to process? Either way, it doesn't sound to me like there's a standard solution you just haven't heard about, so you're on your own unless you can find a way to translate it to a more common problem. But then again, it could easily be a common task I've never heard about :) –  Michael Clerx Aug 16 '12 at 20:12

For comparing two strings or lists you can use the Levenshtein distance (Python implementation from here):

def levenshtein(s1, s2):
    l1 = len(s1)
    l2 = len(s2)
    matrix = [range(l1 + 1)] * (l2 + 1)
    for zz in range(l2 + 1):
        matrix[zz] = range(zz,zz + l1 + 1)
    for zz in range(0,l2):
        for sz in range(0,l1):
            if s1[sz] == s2[zz]:
                matrix[zz+1][sz+1] = min(matrix[zz+1][sz] + 1, 
                                         matrix[zz][sz+1] + 1, 
                                         matrix[zz][sz])
            else:
                matrix[zz+1][sz+1] = min(matrix[zz+1][sz] + 1, 
                                         matrix[zz][sz+1] + 1, 
                                         matrix[zz][sz] + 1)
    return matrix[l2][l1]

Using that on your lists:

>>> a = [4, 7, 9]
>>> b = [5, 8, 10]
>>> c = [2, 3]
>>> levenshtein(a,b)
3
>>> levenshtein(b,c)
3
>>> levenshtein(a,c)
3

EDIT: with the added explanation in the comments, you could use sets instead of lists. Since every element of a set is unique, adding an existing element again is a no-op. And you can use the set's isdisjoint method to check that two sets do not contain the same elements, or the intersection method to see which elements they have in common:

In [1]: a = {1,3,5}

In [2]: a.add(3)

In [3]: a
Out[3]: set([1, 3, 5])

In [4]: a.add(4)

In [5]: a
Out[5]: set([1, 3, 4, 5])

In [6]: b = {2,3,7}
In [7]: a.isdisjoint(b)
Out[7]: False

In [8]: a.intersection(b)
Out[8]: set([3])

N.B.: this syntax of creating sets requires at least Python 2.7.

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Thanks Roland! Although the code might not be useful directly, thanks a bunch for introducing me to the idea of Levenshtein distance. –  RLOA Aug 15 '12 at 11:15

Given the answer you gave to Michael's clarification, you should probably look up "Dynamic Time Warping".

I haven't used http://mlpy.sourceforge.net/ but its blurb says it provides DTW. (Might be a hammer to crack a nut; depends on your use case.)

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Thanks for the reply and link to mlpy, Dan! In fact, the 'warping' should not be applied in my case. The temporal distance counts for matching the pattern as well. I'm looking at other opportunities in mlpy as well. –  RLOA Aug 15 '12 at 16:00

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