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I have a large list, contains a series of ids and related values, extremely shortened version looks like so:

large = [('5501', [(4, 5, 8), (6, -4, -6)]), ('2222', [(2, 4, -5), (1, -15, 4)])]

My goal is to export a modified version of 'large' (with additions) to Excel (every value with its own separate cell - i.e. 5501 being in A1, 4 in A2, 5 in B2, 8 in C2... the first space would be in A4 etc.) which look like this:

DESIRED FORM OUTPUTTED TO EXCEL

5501 
4,5,8 
6,-4,-6
'space here'
'Sorted absolutes maxes'
8, 6, 5
'space here'     
2222 
2,4,-5 
1,-15,4
'space here'
'Sorted absolutes maxes'
15, 5, 2
'space here' 

I have been able to export the above desired form using the following code:

import csv
with open("out1.csv", "wb") as fp: 
   writer = csv.writer(fp, delimiter=",")     
   for entry in large:        
       writer.writerow([entry[0]])         
       for line in entry[1]:             
           writer.writerow(line)        
       writer.writerow([])

However it does not have the required sorted absolute (i.e. neglecting any '-' signs) maxes like in the desired form above included. This is where I need help - help much appreciated.

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1  
Your code indentation was all over the place, please verify that I repaired it correctly. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 15 '12 at 8:41
1  
Also, technically you are exporting to CSV, not Excel. It's probably the correct technique, but I altered the tags for you to focus on that. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 15 '12 at 8:43
    
@MartijnPieters thanks :) –  user1532369 Aug 15 '12 at 9:13
    
Could you clarify how you get the values in your sorted absolute maxes? For 2,4,-5,1,-15,4 shouldn't it 15,5,4 (assuming you want only the three max values) or 15,5,4,4,2,1? –  Michael Mauderer Aug 15 '12 at 11:51
    
DSM nailed it below. –  user1532369 Aug 15 '12 at 13:25
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First you can get the absolute values by mapping your tuples with the abs like this

map(abs, entry[1][0]) 
map(abs, entry[1][1]) 

You can then get the pairwise maxima by first using zip to create the positional pairs

zip(map(abs, entry[1][0]), map(abs, entry[1][1]))

and then again mapping these pairs to their respective maxima:

map(max, zip(map(abs, entry[1][0]), map(abs, entry[1][1])))

Now all you have to do is sort them from max to min and write them to your file:

with open("out1.csv", "wb") as fp: 
   writer = csv.writer(fp, delimiter=",")     
   for entry in large:        
       writer.writerow([entry[0]])         
       for line in entry[1]:             
           writer.writerow(line)        
       writer.writerow([])
       writer.writerow(['Sorted absolute maxes'])
       maxima = map(max, zip(map(abs, entry[1][0]), map(abs, entry[1][1])) )
       writer.writerow(sorted(maxima, reverse=True))
       writer.writerow([])

This gives me the following output:

5501
4,5,8
6,-4,-6

Sorted absolute maxes
8,6,5

2222
2,4,-5
1,-15,4

Sorted absolute maxes
15,5,2
share|improve this answer
2  
I think the OP wants sorted absmax by columns. So for the first group, you'd get (6, 5, 8) by column and then sort that to (8, 6, 5). Similarly for the second, you'd get (2, 15, 5) and then sort to (15, 5, 2). Seems to match the data, anyway. –  DSM Aug 15 '12 at 12:24
    
Ahh that does seem to fit. –  Michael Mauderer Aug 15 '12 at 12:26
    
great help, thanks :) –  user1532369 Aug 15 '12 at 13:26
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