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My statement:

statement.addBatch("START TRANSACTION;" +
                "UPDATE FIRST_TABLE SET FIRST_FIELD = 1;" +
                "UPDATE SECOND_TABLE SET SECOND_FIELD = 2;" +
                "UPDATE THIRD_TABLE SET THIRD_FIELD = 3;" +
                "COMMIT;");

And exception throws in next line:

statement.executeBatch();

The same thing happens if I use the method execute:

statement.execute(myTransaction);

The exception:

java.sql.BatchUpdateException: ORA-00900: invalid SQL statement

I use Oracle. I don't have any exception if I execute this statement in command line or SQL IDE. It works properly in this case. There is this exception only in java code. What is wrong?

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try,

connection.setAutoCommit(false);
statement.addBatch("UPDATE FIRST_TABLE SET FIRST_FIELD = 1");
statement.addBatch("UPDATE SECOND_TABLE SET SECOND_FIELD = 2");
statement.addBatch("UPDATE THIRD_TABLE SET THIRD_FIELD = 3");
int [] counts = statement.executeBatch();
connection.commit();
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Try to add each Update Statement in a separated addBatch()

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Generally, you would using the connection's setAutoCommit() method to start a transaction, run the statements, and finally call commit() or rollback() appropriately. This is kind of a DB-agnostic way to work in transactions. Not sure, why you want to construct SQL for the same! Could you elaborate on your use case?

Connection con = dataSource.getConnection();
try {
    con.setAutoCommit(false);
    Statement stmt = con.prepareStatement("<your update statement with placeholders for  parameters");
    stmt.set(1, <Value1>);
    stmt.set(2, <Value2>);
    stmt.execute();
    con.commit();
}
catch (SQLException sqle) {
    // Handle the exception
    con.rollback();
}
finally {
    con.close();
}

Note: There are many corner cases to handle in the above code while obtaining connection and while closing it, left out to make this look simple for now!

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As a side note,in order to create a batch of SQLs you have to separately add each statement to the batch.

So, instead of:

     statement.addBatch("START TRANSACTION;" +
            "UPDATE FIRST_TABLE SET FIRST_FIELD = 1;" +
            "UPDATE SECOND_TABLE SET SECOND_FIELD = 2;" +
            "UPDATE THIRD_TABLE SET THIRD_FIELD = 3;" +
            "COMMIT;");

Use:

     statement.addBatch("START TRANSACTION;");
     statement.addBatch("UPDATE FIRST_TABLE SET FIRST_FIELD = 1;");
     ....

But, this is not the standard way of running transactions. To run a transaction:

    con.setAutoCommit(false); //so that a transaction is not committed after each
                              //statement

    //run you queries
    statement.executeUpdate(); //or statement.executeBatch();
    ...
    //in the end commit
    con.commit();
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JDBC discourages to use statements for functionality which is provided through the driver (like transactions), see docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/sql/Connection.html the reason is that doing this with a statement might put the driver in an inconsistent state –  Mark Rotteveel Aug 16 '12 at 18:35
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