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In Javascript how would i find prime numbers between 0 - 100? i have thought about it, and i am not sure how to find them. i thought about doing x % x but i found the obvious problem with that. this is what i have so far: but unfortunately it is the worst code ever.

var prime = function (){
var num;
for (num = 0; num < 101; num++){
    if (num % 2 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 3 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 4=== 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 5 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 6 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 7 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 8 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 9 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 10 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 11 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else if (num % 12 === 0){
        break;
    }
    else {
        return num;
    }
}
};
console.log(prime());
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3  
Java or JavaScript? That code looks like JavaScript because of the var and ===. JavaScript is something totally different from Java. –  Jesper Aug 15 '12 at 8:59
    
If it can only ever be between 0 and 100, probably best just to find a list of prime numbers and make an array of them. Then, check indexOf(number) == -1 –  user1486147 Aug 15 '12 at 9:00
2  
Quick search revealed this great answer stackoverflow.com/questions/9138872/… –  Peter Aug 15 '12 at 9:03
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13 Answers 13

Here's an example of a sieve implementation in JavaScript:

function getPrimes(max) {
    var sieve = [], i, j, primes = [];
    for (i = 2; i <= max; ++i) {
        if (!sieve[i]) {
            // i has not been marked -- it is prime
            primes.push(i);
            for (j = i << 1; j <= max; j += i) {
                sieve[j] = true;
            }
        }
    }
    return primes;
}

Then getPrimes(100) will return an array of all primes between 2 and 100 (inclusive). Of course, due to memory constraints, you can't use this with large arguments.

A Java implementation would look very similar.

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Nice- could you explain the j for loop? I couldnt find documentation around the "<<" part. –  Bubbleware Technology Jul 6 '13 at 21:17
2  
@BubblewareTechnology - The << operator shifts the left operand left by one bit (after converting it to an integer value if necessary). It's just a quick way to multiply by 2. The inner loop just sets sieve[j] to true for all multiples of i. The reason for doing this is that no multiple of i can be prime. –  Ted Hopp Jul 7 '13 at 1:56
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Here's how I solved it. Rewrote it from Java to JavaScript, so excuse me if there's a syntax error.

function isPrime (n)
{
    if (n < 2) return false;

    /**
     * An integer is prime if it is not divisible by any prime less than or equal to its square root
     **/

    var q = (int) Math.sqrt (n);

    for (var i = 2; i <= q; i++)
    {
        if (n % i == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

A number, n, is a prime if it isn't divisible by any other number other than by 1 and itself. Also, it's sufficient to check the numbers [2, sqrt(n)].

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2  
Instead of (int) Math.sqrt (n) use parseInt(Math.sqrt(n)), corrected via edit. Using [abs()](http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_abs.asp) negative numbers can be tested too. Also, according to logic, the if (n < 2) should return true, since it's a prime number then. –  DJDavid98 Dec 20 '12 at 19:39
    
Just FYI, this solution is psuedopolynomial. Don't use it unless you know that n will be small. –  mihsathe Feb 19 '13 at 8:04
    
FYI, it is the algorithm with the least iterations in this thread. But yes, I agree that the larger the n --> find a better one (and win a price money for discovering a new prime :) ) –  DavidS Feb 19 '13 at 8:26
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Whatever the language, one of the best and most accessible ways of finding primes within a range is using a sieve.

Not going to give you code, but this is a good starting point.

For a small range, such as yours, the most efficient would be pre-computing the numbers.

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Here is the live demo of this script: http://jsfiddle.net/K2QJp/

First, make a function that will test if a single number is prime or not. If you want to extend the Number object you may, but I decided to just keep the code as simple as possible.

function isPrime(num) {
    if(num < 2) return false;
    for (var i = 2; i < num; i++) {
        if(num%i==0)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

This script goes through every number between 2 and 1 less than the number and tests if there is any number in which there is no remainder if you divide the number by the increment. If there is any without a remainder, it is not prime. If the number is less than 2, it is not prime. Otherwise, it is prime.

Then make a for loop to loop through the numbers 0 to 100 and test each number with that function. If it is prime, output the number to the log.

for(var i = 0; i < 100; i++){
    if(isPrime(i)) console.log(i);
}
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@argshook wanted to make this comment, but his rep was too low, so I'm adding it on their behalf. "Shouldn't isPrime() loop check if num % i !== 0 rather than num % i == 0?" –  Gray Oct 29 '13 at 13:36
    
THIS IS WRONG, IT LOGS 9, 15, 25, 35 ...... –  Mike Jun 2 at 12:37
    
@Mike - I'm not sure why you're saying that. I verified the output and it logs correctly. For a version without needing to use the console window look here. @Gray / @argshook - That line is for checking if num is divisible by i or the current number we're checking. If it is divisible by any number less than the current number, we return false which means it is not a prime number. –  Evan Kennedy Jun 4 at 20:41
    
@EvanKennedy: Sorry but you would have to blame console for that. your snippet in answer // for(var i = 0; i < 100; i++){ if(isPrime(i)) console.log(i); }, doesn't log the correct results. –  Mike Jun 6 at 12:13
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Luchian's answer gives you a link to the standard technique for finding primes.

A less efficient, but simpler approach is to turn your existing code into a nested loop. Observe that you are dividing by 2,3,4,5,6 and so on ... and turn that into a loop.

Given that this is homework, and given that the aim of the homework is to help you learn basic programming, a solution that is simple, correct but somewhat inefficient should be fine.

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First, change your inner code for another loop (for and while) so you can repeat the same code for different values.

More specific for your problem, if you want to know if a given n is prime, you need to divide it for all values between 2 and sqrt(n). If any of the modules is 0, it is not prime.

If you want to find all primes, you can speed it and check n only by dividing by the previously found primes. Another way of speeding the process is the fact that, apart from 2 and 3, all the primes are 6*k plus or less 1.

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It's actually between 2 and sqrt(n). –  Luchian Grigore Aug 15 '12 at 9:27
    
Yes, you are right. If a number bigger than sqrt(n) is a divider of n, it means that it is quotient is smaller than sqrt(n) so it would have been already found. Correcting. –  SJuan76 Aug 15 '12 at 9:34
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It would behoove you, if you're going to use any of the gazillion algorithms that you're going to be presented with in this thread, to learn to memoize some of them.

See Interview question : What is the fastest way to generate prime number recursively?

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why try delete by 4 (6,8,10,12) if already tried deleting by 2? Why try delete by 9 if already tried deleting by 3? Why try delete by 11 if 11*11=121 > 100? Why try delete any odd number by 2 at all?

Eliminate dead tests and you'll get yourself a primo code for testing primes below 100.

And your code is very far from being the worst code ever. Many many others would try dividing 100 by 99. But the absolute champion would generate all products of 2..96 with 2..96 to test whether 97 is among them. That one really is astonishingly inefficient.

Sieve of Eratosthenes of course is much better, and you can have one - for under 100s - with no arrays of booleans (and no divisions too!):

console.log(2)
var m3=9, m5=25, m7=49, i=3
for( ; i<100; i+=2 )
{
    if( i!=m3 && i!=m5 && i!=m7) console.log(i)
    else
    {
        if( i==m3 ) m3+=6
        if( i==m5 ) m5+=10
        if( i==m7 ) m7+=14
    }
} "DONE"
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<code>
<script language="javascript">
   var n=prompt("Enter User Value")
     var x=1;
       if(n==0 || n==1) x=0;
          for(i=2;i<n;i++)
           {
          if(n%i==0)
       {
     x=0;
     break;
       }
           }
           if(x==1)
             {
                alert(n +" "+" is prime");
             }
             else
             {
                alert(n +" "+" is not prime");
             }


          </script>

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Using recursion combined with the square root rule from here, checks whether a number is prime or not:

function isPrime(num){

    // An integer is prime if it is not divisible by any prime less than or equal to its square root
    var squareRoot = parseInt(Math.sqrt(num));
    var primeCountUp = function(divisor){
        if(divisor > squareRoot) {
            // got to a point where the divisor is greater than 
            // the square root, therefore it is prime
            return true;
        }
        else if(num % divisor === 0) {
            // found a result that divides evenly, NOT prime
            return false;
        }
        else {
            // keep counting
            return primeCountUp(++divisor);
        }
    };

    // start @ 2 because everything is divisible by 1
    return primeCountUp(2);

}
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Use following function to find out prime numbers :

function primeNumbers() {
    var p
    var n = document.primeForm.primeText.value
    var d
    var x
    var prime
    var displayAll = 2 + " "
    for (p = 3; p <= n; p = p + 2) {
        x = Math.sqrt(p)
        prime = 1
        for (d = 3; prime && (d <= x); d = d + 2)
        if ((p % d) == 0) prime = 0
        else prime = 1
        if (prime == 1) {
            displayAll = displayAll + p + " "
        }
    }
    document.primeForm.primeArea.value = displayAll
}
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<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function primeNumber() {
 x=document.getElementById('txt_field').value;
  for (i=1; i<=parseInt(x); i++) {
  var flag=0,flag1=0; 
    for (j=2; j<i; j++) {
      if(i%j==0){
       flag=1;
      if(i==x)
       flag1=1;
      }
    }
   if(flag==0)
    document.write(i+'<br>');
  }
   if(flag1==0) 
    document.write('Its a prime number.');
   else 
    document.write('Its not a prime number.');
}
</script>
</head>

<body>
 <input id="txt_field" type="text" name="field" />
 <input type="button" name="submit" value="Submit" onclick="primeNumber();" />
</body>
</html>
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check the number is prime or not with JS function

function isPrime(num)
        {
            var flag = true;
            for(var i=2; i<=Math.ceil(num/2); i++)
            {
                if((num%i)==0)
                {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return flag;    
        }
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