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Sorry if this is a duplicate but I couldn't find any satisfying answers in the previous posts.

$(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: 'ajax/test.html',
        success: function(data) {
            // Data received here
        }
    });
});

[or]

someFunction() {
    return $.ajax({
        // Call and receive data
    });
}

var myVariable;

someFunction().done(function(data) {
    myVariable = data;
    // Do stuff with myVariable
});

The above code works just fine. However, this ajax request is made on page load and I want to process this data later on. I know I can include the processing logic inside the callback but I don't want to do that. Assigning the response to a global variable is not working either because of the asynchronous nature of the call.

In both the above ways, the 'data' is confined either to the success callback or the done callback and I want to access it outside of these if possible. This was previously possible with jQuery 'async:false' flag but this is deprecated in jQuery 1.8.

Any suggestions are appreciated. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
When do you want to process the data? Upon some event like button press? –  Bart Platak Aug 15 '12 at 10:04
    
Something like that... My issue is, the ajax request is the first thing that happens and as a result I have to add remaining of the application logic[that depends on data] inside this callback and it's all becoming a mess very quick. –  Sparda Aug 15 '12 at 10:06
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can "outsource" the callback to a normal function, so you can put it somewhere, you like it:

$(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: 'ajax/test.html',
        success: yourOwnCallback
    });
});

somehwere else you can define your callback

function yourOwnCallback(data) {
  // Data received and processed here
}

this is even possible with object methods as well

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort. Upvoted. –  Sparda Aug 15 '12 at 10:24
3  
Please note the deprecation notice in the ajax documentation: Deprecation Notice: The jqXHR.success(), jqXHR.error(), and jqXHR.complete() callbacks will be deprecated in jQuery 1.8. To prepare your code for their eventual removal, use jqXHR.done(), jqXHR.fail(), and jqXHR.always() instead. I think using .done is preferred to success:. Unlike success the .done method is chained to the ajax call. –  François Wahl Aug 15 '12 at 10:48
    
Thanks for the suggestion Francois. –  Sparda Aug 15 '12 at 11:05
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This solution might not be idea but I hope it helps.

  • Set the variable upon callback.
  • Wherever you need to process the data, check if variable is set and if not wait somehow.

Try:

$(document).ready(function(){
    var myVar = false;
    $.ajax({
        url: 'ajax/test.html',
        success: function(data) {
            myVar=data;
        }
    });

    someFunction(){ //this is invoked when you need processing
        while(myVar==false){}
        ... do some other stuff ..
    }
});

Or

someFunction(){
    if(myVar==false){
        setTimeout(someFunction(),100); //try again in 100ms
        return;
    }
.. do some other stuff ..
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... Waiting somehow is the hard part though..:) –  Sparda Aug 15 '12 at 10:21
    
@Sparda: Unfortunately JavaScript doesn't really have a blocking sleep function, so you have to enclose the code inside a function and keep playing with setTimeout :/ You could also play around with jQuery().when, but I don't think that will be any easier. –  Bart Platak Aug 15 '12 at 10:22
    
Thanks for the effort. Upvoted. –  Sparda Aug 15 '12 at 10:24
    
@Sparda: Hope it helps. Shame that JavaScript doesn't let us do those kind of things easily. –  Bart Platak Aug 15 '12 at 10:25
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