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I have an array with 32 numbers. Initially, every number is 0, although it's probably not important.

At any time I can change one number in this array.

I want to quickly find the minimum value and its index after such an update. Is there a way to do it in O(1) time?

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You can log what you want simultaneously when you change the numbers in the array? –  irrelephant Aug 15 '12 at 10:03
6  
almost everything you do on an array of size 32 is O(1). Linear scan requires 32 comparisons, which is in O(1) –  amit Aug 15 '12 at 10:04
    
@amit The size of the array does not matter in deciding if the algorithm is O(1) or not. Linear scan on an array with 32 values is not O(1). –  user16367 Aug 15 '12 at 10:11
2  
@user16367: It is. O(1) = constant number of ops. If the array is of size 32 (or any fixed size for the matter), the number of ops is indeed constant (Think of it this way: you can replace the linear scan with a chained if conditions instead of a loop: if (arr[0] < min), if (arr[1] < min) , ... if (arr[31] < min) –  amit Aug 15 '12 at 10:13
    
A min-heap comes to mind, but for an array with such a tiny constant size I would bet that you are probably better off with a naive linear scan since the constant is smaller and the compiler will probably optimize it into e.g. a jump table. It also depends a bit on which (if any) of the operations is more frequent: modification or finding the minimum. –  smocking Aug 15 '12 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

almost everything you do on an array of size 32 is O(1). Linear scan requires 32 comparisons, which is in O(1)

O(1) = constant number of ops. If the array is of size 32 (or any fixed size for the matter), the number of ops is indeed constant (Think of it this way: you can replace the linear scan with a chained if conditions instead of a loop:
if (arr[0] < min), if (arr[1] < min) , ... if (arr[31] < min)

For the thrill of it, regarding the general case for an array of size n, it is not possible with compare based algorithms.
If it was, we could sort in O(n) using comparisons based algorithm:

given an array A:
max <- max(A)
build an empty data structure as desired let it be `S`.
for each element of A - insert it into S in a different index.
while (S.min() <= max):
   idx <- S.findminIndex()
   print S.min()
   S.update(idx,max+1)

Assuming each op in the above algorithm is O(1), and the loop iterates n times, your algorithm sorts A in O(n) - which cannot be done, since comparations based sorting are proved to be Omega(nlogn) problem

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Sadly, I think this makes sense, that it's impossible to do. –  user16367 Aug 15 '12 at 10:27
1  
I would disagree with your terminology but I see your point. The big Oh notation is about considering how running time/space changes with the problem size. In this case for an array of size n a linear scan requires O(n) operations. For a given n it would be constant as you have pointed out. –  brain Aug 15 '12 at 10:29
    
last upvoter (and @user16367): It was my 1000th upvote on algorithms. I am expected to get the algorithms golden badge thanks to it tomorrow, and be the 2nd ever SO user to earn it. thanks! :) –  amit Aug 15 '12 at 10:42
    
Congratulations :) –  hvd Aug 15 '12 at 10:49
    
I'll reword my previous comment to fit the question: for everything you can do on a fixed-length array of fixed-size numbers that takes no other input, if it finishes, it's O(1). I think it's correct like that, or did I miss anything else? –  hvd Aug 15 '12 at 10:52

I can't offer an O(1) algorithm, may be one good way is using min heap, to do your updates in O(log n) and do find minimum in O(1). min heap for small size array is fast enough and you performance in update is negligible.

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Yes, this would be my last resort. –  user16367 Aug 15 '12 at 10:20
    
And I doubt that if you could find better option when there is no restriction in your inputs, also take care log n is too small and is better than too many of linear algorithms with large constant factor. –  Saeed Amiri Aug 15 '12 at 10:22

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