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I thought about it and technically you could use databases tables and temporary tables/database views directly from a client.

  1. So wouldn't it be more efficient for the client to interact directly with the database as opposed to using a tiered architecture?
  2. What are the cons?
  3. Are there any libraries/frameworks in Java that help do this already?

Here is a demo model that I have created to demonstrate a high-level working of my proposal:

Cloud-Based Content & Transport

Some of the Benefits of this model would include:

  1. No Guru knowledge of Web Services, XML, JMS and more will be required to interact with other systems and platforms. This also means that new graduates will be able to learn more about other, more beneficial things, rather than learning something that is so vast and yet offers so little in contrast to what we already have.
  2. Security concerns that would normally be left with architects and developers when making a web service will now be left with DB server providers like MySQL, PostgreSQL, etc.
  3. No more outdated transport mechanisms as all transport will be handled by DB server providers. This will also attribute to better scalability and more competition between enterprise DB server providers.
  4. Replication of methodology when connecting to other systems. Less time spent studying the data you retrieve and how you retrieve it. The "usual steps" could be a simple publication of connection url, username, password instead of a bunch of urls and what data they contain and how you use the data in terms of processing and security.
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1 Answer 1

The problem with using the database... So many issues here. Not all platforms have free databases available. Access to mainframe based services is always an issue, and not only technical, but cost. You want to access a Mainframe based DB, they are going to charge you for every single client.

What happens when you change databases? Maybe move to in-memory or a Hadoop solution, you need to rewrite your client software to deal with it, since they are so tightly interwoven. With a Web Service, the middle tier changes, but not the interface between the client.

How do you manage resources? In a web service, you can limit the number of threads running, with a database, your clients could potentially bring the server to it's knees and there's not much you can do about it.

In most enterprise-wide shops, the databases are not free. The database vendors would love your solution, as they would love to charge you for all those connections.

Scalability... your pretty much limited to database scaling solutions.

Is your solution a fit for some number of applications? Absolutely, it really depends on your goals and the scope of the project your working on.

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I have added a quick-concept diagram in my question to illustrate a very high level approach. You want to access a Mainframe based DB, they are going to charge you for every single client Well, not per client but per DB user maybe. Perhaps a new component that joins users from the web app with the DB's users? What happens when you change databases? You won't need to, check the diagram. It would be the same as saying "what happens if you change the wsdl url?". –  ThreaT Aug 16 '12 at 8:19
    
How do you manage resources? In a web service, you can limit the number of threads running, with a database, your clients could potentially bring the server to it's knees and there's not much you can do about it. Actually, most SQL servers are much further along the way in terms of scalability and security than what web services are. –  ThreaT Aug 16 '12 at 8:20
    
Scalability... your pretty much limited to database scaling solutions. Check the diagram. Java already has threading/async and all that good stuff, no need to over-engineer... Yeah, I think that the only thing XML and Web Services have going for them is their popularity and hype to be honest. I don't think it's the best way of doing things, I don't think it's a good investment to spend your time getting involved with either of them when at the end of the day they just duplicate functionality unnecessarily too often. –  ThreaT Aug 16 '12 at 8:24
    
@ThreaT You architecture is useful in many ways, and was how it was done for a long time on internal systems. The only correct architecture is the one you need. I'm not sure exposing your database is something you want to do, but some people need to learn the hard way. Web services is one solution among many. You have message bus architecture, queueing architectures, cacheing architectures, etc., and differing reasons to use them. I think your views are limited by your lack of opportunity to implement these things. Go build a few large-scale systems and revisit this topic in a few years. –  Mike Aug 16 '12 at 15:23
    
Go build a few large-scale systems and revisit this topic in a few years. I think you're assuming a lot in this sentence and not being open minded either. You're assuming I have no experience with architecture and you're being narrow minded towards new ideas. You architecture is useful in many ways I'm glad you can see that - just because there are some challenges it does not render the idea useless. You might look at an athlete when they are a kid and say they stand no chance then years later they become the best athlete in the world because they had the potential. Potential is the issue. –  ThreaT Aug 17 '12 at 8:22

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