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Some of functions in my program needs to run a long time so that the user may interrupted it. The structure is like this:

int MainWindow::someFunc1()
{
    //VP is a class defined somewhere.
    VP vp1;
    //the for loop that needs time to execute.
    return 0;
}

int MainWindow::someFunc2()
{
    VP vp2;
    //another loop that consumes time.
    return 0;
}

If the user run the either of functions or at the same time and click exit on the right top, the program will still run in background until the loop is finished. I tried to free the resources in void closeEvent(QCloseEvent *) :

void MainWindow::closeEvent(QCloseEvent *)
{
    vp.stopIt();
}

However since vp1 and vp2 are local variables, I don't know how to pass them into the closeEvent() function and free resources. Any suggestions will be appreciated.

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1  
How would someFunc1 and someFunc2 be ran at the same time when they are both in the main GUI thread? On a similar note, you should never perform long running tasks in the GUI thread (it causes the GUI to freeze unsurprisingly), put them into separate threads. – cmannett85 Aug 15 '12 at 11:49

Since the variables are created on the stack, they will be automatically freed in the end of their scope (at the closing } of the function in your case), you don't have to worry about them.

If you want to free them before the function ends, you need to re-implement the functions and probably allocate and free the memory for those variables by yourself, outside of the function. The way you pass them to the functions (either passing them as function arguments, or including them into the class) depends on you.

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You can't. You should declare vp1 and vp2 in MainWindow as member variable.

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Hmm, it is a good idea. But what if there are almost 10 functions like someFuncX()? Should I define 10 member variables or change my function design? – user957121 Aug 15 '12 at 12:46
1  
How about a std::vector<VP>? – Moritz Aug 15 '12 at 12:55

As far as I understood the OP's requirement, he's looking how to interrupt someFunc1 or someFunc2 when the main window is closed.

Those functions run in the GUI thread, so the following statement is a misunderstanding

the program will still run in background until the loop is finished

What actually happens, the program runs until the function is complete, then the user action is processed by the framework. Therefore, when void MainWindow::closeEvent is executed, nothing is running in the background and resources are already freed.

OP should move someFunc1 and someFunc2 to a worker thread.

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Theoretically, you might be able to do this using setjmp. Something along these lines:

#include "setjmp.h"

jmp_buf doNotAttempt;
jmp_buf badPractice;

int MainWindow::someFunc1()
{
    VP vp1;
    for (...) {
        // do stuff
        if (setjmp(doNotAttempt)) { /*free resources, then: */ longjmp(badPractice,1); }
    }
    return 0;
}

// [...]

void MainWindow::closeEvent(QCloseEvent *)
{
    if (!setjmp(badPractice))
        longjmp(doNotAttempt,1);
    else
        // do the same for your other loop
}

In practice, do not do this - it's a terrible idea for all kinds of reasons. As other folks have said, just declare vp1 and vp2 as member variables.

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