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I have an enum like:

public enum Test:int
{
   A=1, 
   B=2
}

So here I know my enum is an int type but if I want to do something like following:

int a = Test.A;

this doesn't work.

If I have a class like:

public class MyTest
{
    public static int A =1;
}

I can say ,

int a = MyTest.A;

Here I don't need to cast A to int explicitly.

share|improve this question
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/97391/… – 2kay Aug 15 '12 at 12:00
2  
It's a design choice. I guess the C# inventors think it's safer and/or more readable. – Lasse Espeholt Aug 15 '12 at 12:01
    
What compelling reason would exist for this scenario? – Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 15 '12 at 12:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

With your updated example:

public class MyTest
{
    public static int A =1;
}

And usage:

int a = MyTest.A;

That's not how enums look. Enums look more like (comments are places where we differ from a real enum):

public struct MyTest /* Of course, this isn't correct, because we'll inherit from System.ValueType. An enum should inherit from System.Enum */
{
    private int _value; /* Should be marked to be treated specially */
    private MyTest(int value) /* Doesn't need to exist, since there's some CLR fiddling */
    {
       _value = value;
    }

    public static explicit operator int(MyTest value) /* CLR provides conversions automatically */
    {
       return value._value;
    }
    public static explicit operator MyTest(int value) /* CLR provides conversions automatically */
    {
       return new MyTest(value);
    }

    public static readonly MyTest A = new MyTest(1); /* Should be const, not readonly, but we can't do a const of a custom type in C#. Also, is magically implicitly converted without calling a constructor */

    public static readonly MyTest B = new MyTest(2); /* Ditto */
}

Yes, you can easily get to the "underlying" int value, but the values of A and B are still strongly typed as being of type MyTest. This makes sure you don't accidentally use them in places where they're not appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
That's very good example , thanks , now I understand why I have to do casting. Means I have to do unboxing every time I use the value. – Bovi_Khurja Aug 15 '12 at 12:57
    
That's not how enums look - because you can cast any int value to an enum with an underlying value of that type. Enums are "unsafe" in that respect, unfortunately. Also, they're value types rather than reference types. – Jon Skeet Aug 15 '12 at 13:35
1  
@Praveen: No, it doesn't mean you have to do unboxing. Converting from an enum value to its numeric value involves no boxing or unboxing at all. – Jon Skeet Aug 15 '12 at 13:36
1  
@JonSkeet - I didn't say it was 100% - I said they look "more like". I was trying to convey to the OP that whilst there may be static fields containing the named values, the types of those static fields is the type of the enum. I was trying to help them see where their example didn't work. I could add some operators to support conversions in both directions, but it seemed unnecessary. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 15 '12 at 13:37
    
The problem is that there are very significant differences between the class you've given and what enums really look like. It looks hardly anything like what you've provided, I'd say. What you've provided looks more like what Java does. – Jon Skeet Aug 15 '12 at 13:51

So here I know my enum is an int type

No, it's not. It has an underlying type of int, but it's a separate type. Heck, that's half the point of having enums in the first place - that you can keep the types separate.

When you want to convert between an enum value and its numeric equivalent, you cast - it's not that painful, and it keeps your code cleaner in terms of type safety. Basically it's one of those things where the rarity of it being the right thing to do makes it appropriate to make it explicit.

EDIT: One oddity that you should be aware of is that there is an implicit conversion from the constant value 0 to the enum type:

Test foo = 0;

In fact, in the MS implementation, it can be any kind of constant 0:

Test surprise = 0.0;

That's a bug, but one which it's too late to fix :)

I believe the rest for this implicit conversion was to make it simpler to check whether any bits are set in a flags enum, and other comparisons which would use "the 0 value". Personally I'm not a fan of that decision, but it's worth at least being aware of it.

share|improve this answer
    
I mean I know the enum is int, isn't it so confusing that I can tell that my enum has underlying type int but i can't use it like an int. – Bovi_Khurja Aug 15 '12 at 12:03
2  
@Praveen: No, the enum isn't int. The enum has a storage representation of int, but it's a separate type. You shouldn't use it like an int without explicitly doing so... – Jon Skeet Aug 15 '12 at 12:04
1  
@Praveen: "I know the enum is int" - You intuitively understand that it's representing an int, yes. But as far as the compiler is concerned, it's a different type. Just like if you create a class which has no other member than a single public int. You "know it's just an int", but it's really an entirely different type which just happens to internally represent its only data member as an int. – David Aug 15 '12 at 12:09
    
@David: when I have a class with only a public int i'll not have to do type cast it coz i know it's an int, confusion is why I have to do type cast ? – Bovi_Khurja Aug 15 '12 at 12:11
1  
@d4wn: I would surmise so, yes. Not that I'm privy to the design notes of the C# language committee... – Jon Skeet Aug 15 '12 at 13:34

The enum values are not of int type. int is the base type of the enum. The enums are technically ints but logically (from the perspective of the C# language) not. int (System.Int32) is the base type of all enums by default, if you don't explicitly specify another one.

share|improve this answer

You enum is of type Test. It is not int just because your enum has integers values.

You can cast your enum to get the int value:

int a = (int) Test.A;
share|improve this answer
    
That I know I can cast it but the question is why do i need to cast it ? – Bovi_Khurja Aug 15 '12 at 12:04
    
My guess is that it is a design decision to have us explicitly cast. – davenewza Aug 15 '12 at 12:07

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