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I have two samples:

Code 1

public void MyMethod(){
    int i=10;

    for(int x=10; x<10; x++){
        int i=10; //Point1 complier reports error
        var objX = new MyOtherClass();
    }

    var objX = new OtherClassOfMine(); //Point2  complier reports error
}

I understand compiler reporting error at point 1 But i dont understand why it reports error at point2; and if you say because of the organizaion inside MSIL then why code second compiles

Code sample 2

public void MyMethod(){

    for(int x=10; x<10; x++) {
        int i=10; 
        var objX = new MyOtherClass();
    }

    for(int x=10; x<10; x++) {
        int i=10; 
        var objX = new MyOtherClass();
    }
}

If the simple rules of scope applies in Code sample 2 than why is it different in Code sample 1?

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1  
That can't be the exact code (you need methods)...? –  Marc Gravell Jul 28 '09 at 21:52
    
thanks for that . made corrections. –  Prerak K Jul 28 '09 at 21:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

There are two relevant rules here.

The first relevant rule is:

It is an error for a local variable declaration space and a nested local variable declaration space to contain elements with the same name.

(And another answer on this page calls out another location in the specification where we call this out again.)

That alone is enough to make this illegal, but in fact a second rule makes this illegal.

The second relevant rule in C# is:

For each occurrence of a given identifier as a simple-name in an expression or declarator, within the local variable declaration space, immediately enclosing block, or switch-block of that occurrence, every other occurrence of the same identifier as a simple-name in an expression or declarator within the immediately enclosing block or switch-block must refer to the same entity. This rule ensures that the meaning of a name is always the same within a given block, switch block, for-, foreach- or using-statement, or anonymous function.

You also need to know that a for-loop is treated as though there are "invisible braces" around the whole thing.

Now that we know that, let's annotate your code:

public void MyMethod()
{ // 1
    int i=10; // i1
    { // 2 -- invisible brace
      for(int x=10; x<10; x++) // x2
      { // 3
        int i=10;  // i3
        var objX = new MyOtherClass(); // objX3
      } // 3
    } // 2
    var objX = new OtherClasOfMine(); // objX1
} // 1

You have three "simple names", i, x and objX. You have five variables, which I've labeled i1, x2, i3, objX3, and objX1.

The outermost block that contains usages of i and objX is block 1. Therefore, within block 1, i and objX must always refer to the same thing. But they do not. Sometimes i refers to i1 and sometimes it refers to i3. Same with objX.

x, however, only ever means x2, in every block.

Also, both "i" variables are in the same local variable declaration space, as are both "objX" variables.

Therefore, this program is an error in several ways.

In your second program:

public void MyMethod()
{ // 1
    { // 2 -- invisible 
      for(int x=10; x<10; x++)   // x2
      { // 3
        int i=10;  // i3
        var objX = new MyOtherClass(); // objX3
      } //3 
    } // 2
    { // 4 -- invisible
      for(int x=10; x<10; x++)  // x4
      { // 5
        int i=10;  // i5
        var objX = new MyOtherClass();  // objX5
      } //5
   } // 4
} // 1

Now you have three simple names again, and six variables.

The outermost blocks that first contain a usage of simple name x are blocks 2 and 4. Throughout block 2, x refers to x2. Throughout block 4, x refers to x4. Therefore, this is legal. Same with i and objX -- they are used in blocks 3 and 5 and mean different things in each. But nowhere is the same simple name used to mean two different things throughout the same block.

Now, you might note that considering all of block 1, x is used to mean both x2 and x4. But there's no mention of x that is inside block 1 but NOT also inside another block. Therefore we don't count the inconsistent usage in block 1 as relevant.

Also, none of the declaration spaces overlap in illegal ways.

Therefore, this is legal.

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Thanks that was very descriptive. –  Prerak K Jul 28 '09 at 22:31
    
It is easy to remember it as a rule ...but some how i m not able digest why that is limited , wrt first code and objX: i created a variable in a block and when i come out of a loop it shud be finished, just like i cant access it outside the block. –  Prerak K Jul 28 '09 at 22:36
2  
Look at it this way. It should always be legal to move the declaration of a variable UP in the source code so long as you keep it in the same block, right? If we did it the way you suggest, then that would sometimes be legal and sometimes be illegal! But the thing we really want to avoid is what happens in C++ -- in C++, sometimes moving a variable declaration up actually changes the bindings of other simple names! –  Eric Lippert Jul 28 '09 at 22:44

From the C# Language Specification...

The scope of a local variable declared in a local-variable-declaration is the block in which the declaration occurs. It is an error to refer to a local variable in a textual position that precedes the local-variable-declarator of the local variable. Within the scope of a local variable, it is a compile-time error to declare another local variable or constant with the same name.

In code sample 1, both i and objX are declared in the scope of the function, so no other variable in any block inside that function can share a name with them. In code sample 2, both objXs are declared inside of the for loops, meaning that they do not violate the rule of not redeclaring local variables in inner scopes from another declaration.

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You are allowed to use the same variable name in non-overlapping scopes. If one scope overlaps another, though, you cannot have the same variable declared in both. The reason for that is to prevent you from accidentally using an already-used variable name in an inner scope, like you did with i in the first example. It's not really to prevent the objX error since that would, admittedly, not be very confusing, but the error's a consequence of how the rule is applied. The compiler treats objX as having provenance throughout the scope in which it is declared both before and after its declaration, not just after.

In the second example the two for loops have independent, non-overlapping scopes, so you are free to re-use i and objX in the second loop. It's also the reason you can re-use x as your loop counter. Obviously, it would be a dumb restriction if you had to make up different names for each for(i=1;i<10;++i) style loop in a function.

On a personal note, I find this error annoying and prefer the C/C++ way of allowing you do to whatever you want, confusion be damned.

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You should read Eric Lippert's post "C++ and the Pit Of Despair". It will help explain why the C# design team made the decisions they did. I particularly like this quote: "when I ask you guys what the 'intuitively obvious' thing to do is, significant fractions of the population disagree!" –  Adam V Jul 28 '09 at 21:59

you should not be getting a compilation error with the second sample. Try renaming the variables to different letters/names and recompile again as it may be so other issue with the code most likely you've missed a curly bracket and changed the variables scope range.

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