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How to pass by ref different types of objects that have the same properties inside and populate them without interface.

In my app there are totally different types which have some properties in common. Let's say this properties are double arrays.

double[] samples;

Now I have to populate these samples for 20 objects. I don't have any access to the class definition of this object, so I can't make interface, or make them inherit from a base class.

How can use one method which I call and this method to populate all my properties.

I want to have one method like this:

private static void FillSamples(ref WhoKnowsWhat dataType, MyObject theSamples)
{

for (int i = 0; i < sampleCount; i++)
                        {
                            dataType.SampleLength[i] = MyObject.X[i];
                            dataType.SampleValue[i]  = MyObject.y[i];
                        }
}

And call this with totally different types.

FillSamples(ref BigStruct.OneTypeMine, theSamples);
FillSamples(ref BigStruct.AnotherTypeMine, theSamples);
FillSamples(ref BigStruct.HisType12345, theSamples);

Then the big struct should have these samples filled in the end.

Is there a way in C#?

Thanks!

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3  
You shouldn't be using ref. –  SLaks Aug 15 '12 at 12:46
    
Please describe more precisely what you want to do, it is not clear from your current description. Give at least an example how you want to use double[] samples with the method FillSamples - its parameters aren't using samples, nor does the for loop use it. If theSamples is double[] samples, then it does not contain the properties X and Y. –  Matt Aug 15 '12 at 12:50
    
All objects belong to a big structure, so this structure should be populated. All objects are part of it and have those same properties, so when I call FillSamples I need to have the big structure populated. –  st_stefanov Aug 15 '12 at 12:51
1  
Try to describe a simplified, but complete code example that one can put into a console app and run it. Describe the issues and stick to that example. –  Matt Aug 15 '12 at 12:58
1  
How about making an interface and wrapper classes that implement the interface? –  cadrell0 Aug 15 '12 at 13:02
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the dynamic keyword:

private static void FillSamples(dynamic dataType, MyObject theSamples)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < sampleCount; i++)
    {
        dataType.SampleLength[i] = MyObject.X[i];
        dataType.SampleValue[i]  = MyObject.y[i];
    }
}

Edit:

Using reflection (if you don't use .Net 4.0 or higher):

private static void FillSamples(object dataType, MyObject theSamples)
{
    Type t = dataType.GetType();
    var px = t.GetProperty("SampleLength");
    var py = t.GetProperty("SampleValue");

    for (int i = 0; i < sampleCount; i++)
    {
        px.SetValue(dataType, MyObject.X[i], null);
        py.SetValue(dataType, MyObject.Y[i], null);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will try now. Is it supported in .Net 3.5? –  st_stefanov Aug 15 '12 at 12:53
    
You'll need 4.0. For earlier versions, you could use reflection, which will also work, but is more cumbersome. –  sloth Aug 15 '12 at 12:54
    
Yes, reflection could be used, but I wanted to avoid it. Using DYNAMIC was what I was looking for! Thanks. –  st_stefanov Aug 15 '12 at 12:55
    
Actually .Net 3.5 accepted the keyword dynamic!? –  st_stefanov Aug 15 '12 at 12:57
    
nonetheless, I added code using reflection. –  sloth Aug 15 '12 at 12:57
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Don't know if it helps you any, but you can use reflection to find out what properties (and fields, methods etc.) an object supports at runtime. Check out http://www.csharp-examples.net/reflection-property-names/ for example, if you're interested in learning more.

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Thanks for this info! –  st_stefanov Aug 15 '12 at 12:58
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You can use dynamic objects. You should be careful when targeting fields of a dynamic object since they cannot be checked at compile time. See my example below:

[TestFixture]
public class DynamicObjects
{
    [Test]
    public void Dynamic_Call()
    {
        dynamic obj1 = new Apple();
        obj1.Weight = 100;
        obj1.Color = "Red";

        dynamic obj2 = new Orange();
        obj2.Weight = 200;
        obj2.Width = 10;

        Assert.IsTrue(obj1.Weight < obj2.Weight);
    }
}

public class Apple
{
    public int Weight { get; set; }
    public string Color { get; set; }
}

public class Orange
{
    public int Weight { get; set; }
    public int Width { get; set; }
}
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