Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Cursor is not appearing in Editfield..

Following is the code..

ef_mob = new EditField("", "", 11, EditField.NO_NEWLINE|EditField.FILTER_NUMERIC|EditField.FOCUSABLE) {
   protected void paint(Graphics graphics) {
      graphics.setColor(Color.WHITE);
      // graphics.drawRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth()-(getWidth()/10), getHeight(), 5, 5);

      graphics.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth()-(getWidth()/10), getHeight(), 5, 5);
      graphics.setColor(Color.BLACK);

      graphics.drawText(ef_mob.getText(), 0, 0);
      super.paint(graphics);
   }
};

What is the problem?

share|improve this question
    
Could give an idea what do you try to achieve? –  Eugen Martynov Aug 15 '12 at 16:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's kind of silly that it's so much work just to properly draw a rounded rectangle background on an EditField, but it looks like others have had this problem, too

Solution One

If you adapt Peter Strange's answer to that question, your code might look like the MobEditField posted below. I split your anonymous EditField class into a separate class, since a lot of code was added. If you really want, you could keep the code as an anonymous class (which I think is really bad for readability).

private class MobEditField extends EditField {
    private boolean _drawFocus = false;

    public MobEditField() {
        super("", "", 11, EditField.NO_NEWLINE|EditField.FILTER_NUMERIC|EditField.FOCUSABLE);
    }

    protected void paint(Graphics graphics) {
        if (!_drawFocus) {
            int oldColor = graphics.getColor();

            graphics.setColor(Color.WHITE);
            graphics.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth() - (getWidth() / 10), getHeight(), 5, 5);

            graphics.setColor(Color.BLACK);
            graphics.drawText(getText(), 0, 0);

            graphics.setColor(oldColor);
        }
        super.paint(graphics);
    }

    protected void drawFocus(Graphics graphics, boolean on) {
        _drawFocus = on;
        super.drawFocus(graphics, on);
        _drawFocus = false;
    }

    protected void onFocus( int direction ) {
        super.onFocus( direction );
        invalidate();
    }

    protected void onUnfocus() {
        super.onUnfocus();
        invalidate();
    }
}

then you just do:

ef_mob = new MobEditField();

Take note of a few things:

  1. Don't call ef_mob.getText() from within the anonymous class's paint() method. Just call getText(). I don't know how your original code even compiled.
  2. It's best, when overriding the paint() method, to save off the initial Graphics object color (or alpha, or whatever you change), and then reset it at the end.
  3. The onFocus() and onUnfocus() methods are overridden to force repainting
  4. The paint() method just lets super.paint() do all the work when the field is focused. Depending on how you want your field to look, you may need to adjust this a little.

Solution Two

Another alternative that worked for me is to take advantage of the undocumented paintBackground() method, that EditField has. Of course, there's always downsides to using undocumented methods. So, I offer it only as an option:

        ef_mob = new EditField("", "", 11, EditField.NO_NEWLINE|EditField.FILTER_NUMERIC|EditField.FOCUSABLE) {
            protected void paint(Graphics graphics) {
                int oldColor = graphics.getColor();

                graphics.setColor(Color.BLACK);
                graphics.drawText(getText(), 0, 0);

                graphics.setColor(oldColor);
                super.paint(graphics);
            }

            protected void paintBackground(Graphics g) {
                int oldColor = g.getColor();
                g.setColor(Color.WHITE);
                g.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth()-(getWidth()/10), getHeight(), 5, 5);
                g.setColor(oldColor);
            }

        };

Here, I moved the fillRoundRect() call out of paint() and into paintBackground().

share|improve this answer
1  
Good answer. I usually use paintBackground() too. It works for me all the way. –  mrvincenzo Aug 16 '12 at 5:18
    
Why don't use setBackground, setBorder methods? Also calling super.paint() will draw text so you don't need drawText in your code. –  Eugen Martynov Aug 16 '12 at 5:21
    
@Nate Thanks a lot for ur reply... I have used your solution one with some changes..now cursor is appearing.. In paint method, i make some changes.. protected void paint(Graphics graphics) { if ( _drawFocus ) { super.paint(graphics); return; } int oldColor = graphics.getColor(); graphics.setColor(Color.WHITE); graphics.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth()-(getWidth()/10), getHeight(), 5, 5); graphics.setColor(Color.BLACK); super.paint(graphics); graphics.setColor(oldColor); } Thanks a lot For Guide me correctly.. –  Kinjal Shah Aug 16 '12 at 6:23
    
@EugenMartynov, yeah, I generally agree about drawText() not being necessary. It was in the original posted code, so I left it there. Even though the original code was just using black font, I thought it might be a placeholder to later do some different things with the text color. In terms of setBackground, I would assume the reason Kinjal stayed away from that was because of wanting to draw the rounded rectangle background. If it was just a solid color, I would definitely recommend using setBackground, too. –  Nate Aug 16 '12 at 7:12
    
@Nate I missed this point (have to read code carefully). there are still possibility to use background methods for rounded rect (use bitmap background) but it requires more effor and much easier draw it every time. –  Eugen Martynov Aug 16 '12 at 7:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.