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Is there anything to stop me from type hinting like this within the __construct() parentheses?

<?php

    class SomeClass extends BaseClass {

        public function __construct(array $someArray) {

            parent::__construct($someArray);
        }

Or can I only do it like this?

<?php

    class SomeClass extends BaseClass {

        public function __construct($someArray = array()) {

            parent::__construct($someArray);
        }

Edit:

This is what works: (Thanks @hakra and @Leigh)

<?php

    class SomeClass extends BaseClass {

        public function __construct( array $someArray = NULL ) {

            parent::__construct( (array) $someArray);
        }

To me it looks nice and clean and I know exactly what it supposed to mean.

share|improve this question
3  
Looks legit - php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.typehinting.php why not try out? –  Pekka 웃 Aug 15 '12 at 13:18
2  
You can do both: __construct(array $arr=array()) –  Vic Aug 15 '12 at 13:19
    
You've already typed out the code, why didn't you just try running it? –  meagar Aug 15 '12 at 13:20
    
@Pekka, Yeah I guess I just have to test it :) –  Villi Magg Aug 15 '12 at 13:20
    
I need to be able to have the array optional. F.ex. __construct(array $someArr = false). Do you think it's valid? –  Villi Magg Aug 15 '12 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do so:

public function __construct(array $someArray = NULL)
{
    $someArray = (array) $someArray;
    parent::__construct($someArray);
    ...

The case here is to make use of the = NULL exception of the rule. The next line:

    $someArray = (array) $someArray;

is just some shorthand to convert NULL into an empty array and otherwise leave the array an array as-is (a so called castDocs to array):

Converting NULL to an array results in an empty array.

(from: Converting to arrayDocs)

Sure you could write it even shorter:

public function __construct(array $someArray = NULL)
{
    parent::__construct((array) $someArray);
}

but it does not explain it that well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I didn't realise there was a NULL exception to the rule. –  Leigh Aug 15 '12 at 13:23
    
Thanks guys for these real good explanations. I'm trying to vote you guys up but I just get some boring messages. –  Villi Magg Aug 15 '12 at 13:32
    
Ok, I tried this method out and it worked perfectly. To me it looks great doing it like @hakra described in this posts short method. Thank you. –  Villi Magg Aug 15 '12 at 14:07

This is type hinting with no default, stating that a parameter must be given, and it's type must be an array

public function __construct(array $someArray) {


This is providing the default value for the argument if no parameter is passed, without a typehint.

public function __construct($someArray = array()) {


They are two different things.

In the second instance you can call the function with no parameters and it will work, but the first will not.

If you want, you can combine the two, to specify an default and specify the required type.

public function __construct(array $someArray = array()) {

Or as @hakre has stated, you can do:

public function __construct(array $someArray = NULL) {

share|improve this answer
1  
No must if you make it optional (array $someArray = NULL), check for NULL, make it optional. –  hakre Aug 15 '12 at 13:21
    
__construct(array $someArray) will not accept null as its argument. –  Ja͢ck Aug 15 '12 at 13:33
    
array $someArray = array() will work fine, using null is just misleading in my opinion. –  jmalloc Aug 15 '12 at 13:40
    
@Jack You're right, it can only have NULL supplied as a default value. –  Leigh Aug 15 '12 at 13:53
    
@Leigh, thank you for this thorough explanation! Thumbs up! –  Villi Magg Aug 15 '12 at 14:08

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