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I have a list of Error notifications showing up in my top menu.

<MenuItem Header="{Binding NotificationList.UnreadCount}"
    HeaderStringFormat="Notifications ({0})"
    ItemsSource="{Binding NotificationList.Notifications}">
 </MenuItem>

What I would like to do is "blink" the application by changing the background color to red and then back (ColorAnimation, 1s, AutoRevert) every time the size of NotificationList changes (and is greater then zero). The NotificationList already notifies the view when it changes.

Could anybody help me with writing the correct trigger for changing ItemsSource's size and within this trigger, changing the background color of the application window (not of the element itself)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have no idea how to do this with a trigger, but you could create an attached behaviour that adds a handler to the ItemsSource's CollectionChanged event.

Provided that your main window's background is set to a SolidColorBrush like below

<Window ...>
    <Window.Background>
        <SolidColorBrush Color="{x:Static SystemColors.ControlColor}"/>
    </Window.Background>
    ...
</Window>

such an attached behaviour could look like this:

public class ItemsControlBehaviours
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChangeProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
            "BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChange", typeof(bool), typeof(ItemsControlBehaviours),
            new PropertyMetadata(BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChangePropertyChanged));

    public static bool GetBlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChange(ItemsControl itemsControl)
    {
        return (bool)itemsControl.GetValue(BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChangeProperty);
    }

    public static void SetBlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChange(ItemsControl itemsControl, bool value)
    {
        itemsControl.SetValue(BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChangeProperty, value);
    }

    private static void BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChangePropertyChanged(
        DependencyObject obj, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        ItemsControl itemsControl = obj as ItemsControl;
        INotifyCollectionChanged collection;

        if (itemsControl != null &&
            (collection = itemsControl.ItemsSource as INotifyCollectionChanged) != null)
        {
            if ((bool)e.NewValue)
            {
                collection.CollectionChanged += ItemsSourceCollectionChanged;
            }
            else
            {
                collection.CollectionChanged -= ItemsSourceCollectionChanged;
            }
        }
    }

    private static void ItemsSourceCollectionChanged(
        object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        SolidColorBrush background =
            Application.Current.MainWindow.Background as SolidColorBrush;

        if (background != null)
        {
            ColorAnimation backgroundAnimation = new ColorAnimation
            {
                To = Colors.Red,
                Duration = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1),
                AutoReverse = true
            };

            background.BeginAnimation(
                SolidColorBrush.ColorProperty, backgroundAnimation);
        }
    }
}

Note that blink color and duration are hardcoded here and you might have to find a way to parameterize them.

You could now use this behaviour on any ItemsControl that has its ItemsSource property set:

<ListBox ItemsSource="..." Background="Transparent"
    local:ItemsControlBehaviours.BlinkMainWindowOnItemsSourceChange="True" />
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My original background color is declared like this Background="{StaticResource {x:Static SystemColors.ControlBrushKey}}" –  Tomas Grosup Aug 16 '12 at 7:57
    
An an exception pops up in the BeginAnimation method, that it cannot animate color, because it is sealed or frozen. –  Tomas Grosup Aug 16 '12 at 7:57
    
You have to set the Window.Background to a new SolidColorBrush, as i wrote in my answer. Of course you can't animate a system brush. You can perhaps set the Color property of that new SolidColorBrush to a system color. –  Clemens Aug 16 '12 at 8:01
    
See edited answer for how to set the background to a new SolidColorBrush with SystemColors.ControlColor. –  Clemens Aug 16 '12 at 8:55
    
I assigned a new SolidColorBrush(background.Color) and it works, thank you. –  Tomas Grosup Aug 16 '12 at 9:26

This probably isn't as simple as you'd like, but it works for what you need. All this code is in the mainwindow of my test harness, so some things may need to be altered to fit your specific situation. The idea is the same though.

The first thing we need to do is set ourselves up to get an event when the collection changes. I use an observable collection, because I would assume that's what you're using if you're binding:

  ObservableCollection<String> m_NotificationList;
  // Propertized for binding purposes
  public ObservableCollection<String> NotificationList
  {
     get
     {
        return m_NotificationList;
     }
  }

  public MainWindow()
  {
     InitializeComponent();

     this.DataContext = this;

     m_NotificationList = new ObservableCollection<string>() { "hey", "ho", "lets", "go" };
     m_NotificationList.CollectionChanged += CollectionChangeCallback;
  }

The next step is to define some routed event that we can send to the window when it's time to flash itself. We do this in the class definition for mainwindow, like above:

     public static readonly RoutedEvent FlashEvent =
     EventManager.RegisterRoutedEvent("Flash",
     RoutingStrategy.Tunnel, typeof(RoutedEventHandler), typeof(MainWindow));

  public event RoutedEventHandler Flash
  {
     add { AddHandler(FlashEvent, value); }
     remove { RemoveHandler(FlashEvent, value); }
  }

Now we need to define our callback for when the collection updates, again in the class definition for mainwindow:

void CollectionChangeCallback(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   // Don't fire if we don't want to flash
   if (m_NotificationList.Count > 0)
      window.RaiseEvent(new RoutedEventArgs(FlashEvent));
}

Now we go to the XAML and add a trigger to our MainWindow, which handles the routed event we just created and does the animation we want to do:

<Window.Triggers>
   <EventTrigger RoutedEvent="local:MainWindow.Flash" >
      <BeginStoryboard>
         <Storyboard>
            <ColorAnimation AutoReverse="True"
                                  Duration="0:0:1"
                                  FillBehavior="Stop"
                                  From="White"
                                  Storyboard.TargetName="window"
                                  Storyboard.TargetProperty="Background.Color"
                                  To="Red" />
         </Storyboard>
      </BeginStoryboard>
   </EventTrigger>
</Window.Triggers>

This works as you asked for in my test harness. It's a bit awkward but I couldn't find a better way to do it. For clarity, I'll include my XAML with code-behind here as well. It's an empty window with a MenuItem and a button that adds strings to the collection. You can see the flash and the way the events come together to make it happen.

XAML:

<Window x:Class="WPFTestbed.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WPFTestbed"
        x:Name="window"
        Title="MainWindow"
        Width="525"
        Height="350">

   <Window.Triggers>
      <EventTrigger RoutedEvent="local:MainWindow.Flash" >
         <BeginStoryboard>
            <Storyboard>
               <ColorAnimation AutoReverse="True"
                                     Duration="0:0:1"
                                     FillBehavior="Stop"
                                     From="White"
                                     Storyboard.TargetName="window"
                                     Storyboard.TargetProperty="Background.Color"
                                     To="Red" />
            </Storyboard>
         </BeginStoryboard>
      </EventTrigger>
   </Window.Triggers>

   <StackPanel>
      <MenuItem x:Name="menu"
                Header="{Binding NotificationList.Count}"
                HeaderStringFormat="Notifications ({0})"
                ItemsSource="{Binding NotificationList}">
      </MenuItem>
      <Button Click="Button_Click"
              Content="Hi" />
   </StackPanel>
</Window>

Code behind (-includes for space):

namespace WPFTestbed
{
   /// <summary>
   /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
   /// </summary>
   public partial class MainWindow : Window
   {
      public static readonly RoutedEvent FlashEvent =
         EventManager.RegisterRoutedEvent("Flash",
         RoutingStrategy.Tunnel, typeof(RoutedEventHandler), typeof(MainWindow));

      public event RoutedEventHandler Flash
      {
         add { AddHandler(FlashEvent, value); }
         remove { RemoveHandler(FlashEvent, value); }
      }

      ObservableCollection<String> m_NotificationList;

      public ObservableCollection<String> NotificationList
      {
         get
         {
            return m_NotificationList;
         }
      }

      public MainWindow()
      {
         InitializeComponent();

         this.DataContext = this;

         m_NotificationList = new ObservableCollection<string>() { "hey", "ho", "lets", "go" };
         m_NotificationList.CollectionChanged += CollectionChangeCallback;
      }

      void CollectionChangeCallback(object sender, EventArgs e)
      {
         if (m_NotificationList.Count > 0)
            window.RaiseEvent(new RoutedEventArgs(FlashEvent));
      }
      private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
      {
         m_NotificationList.Add("Another");
      }
   }
}
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