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Suppose I use a item of an array inside a loop, like

INS *in;
for (int i = 0; i < LEN; i++) {
    in = g_ins[i];
    if (strcmp(in->mne, str) == 0)
        return in;
}

If i refer each reference using the index, this is optimized by the compiler to something like above, or it really access each index again and again?

for (int i = 0; i < LEN; i++) {
    if (strcmp(g_ins[i]->mne, str) == 0)
        return g_ins[i];
}
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To be safe, why not move INS * const in = g_ins[i]; inside the loop? –  Kerrek SB Aug 15 '12 at 13:54
    
@KerrekSB - i like to use less lines as possible :p –  Fabricio Aug 15 '12 at 14:02
    
@KerrekSB:- variables inside loops are allowed in C89 ??? –  perilbrain Aug 15 '12 at 14:03
    
@Anonymous: No, but 1989 finished yesterday :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 15 '12 at 14:05
1  
@Anonymous: of course; variables could be defined at the top of any block ({ optional vars; code; }) in pre-standard C, let alone C89. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 15 '12 at 14:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try it, if in doubt. For example, put your two pieces of code into functions:

INS * f1 (INS *g_ins, const char * str)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < LEN; i++) {
        INS *in = &g_ins[i];
        if (strcmp(in->mne, str) == 0)
            return in;
    }
    return NULL;
}

INS * f2 (INS *g_ins, const char * str)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < LEN; i++) {
        if (strcmp(g_ins[i].mne, str) == 0)
            return &g_ins[i];
    }
    return NULL;
}

and then compile them with -O2 and -S (eg. gcc -std=c99 -O2 -S -Wall code.c -o code.s). -O2 sets the optimisation level and -S tells the compiler to produce the assembler code and stop.

Then look at the assembler code.

Even if you dont understand assembler very well, you should be able to get an idea of the relative sizes of the two functions. In the case of your functions, they compile to the same code.

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Depends highly on your compiler and compiler settings.

Generally I wouldn't worry about it, though.

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With almost any level of optimization, the compiler will probably generate the same code for the two fragments. In fact, without optimization, it might do better with the version without the explicit local variable because it would not need to store the value of g_ins[i] explicitly; it might just put in a register and use that twice.

However, it does depend on the compiler you're using, and the optimization settings. And it is unlikely that any difference here will be the difference between a fast program and a slow program.

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Mostly compiler will avoid such things in normal setting .Your variable is declared outside of the loop and compiler is unsure if there is any further use of INS *in after the loop.So skipping this stage wont do much optimization except for saving a couple of instruction but can lead to corrupted output in later stages.

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