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I want to have a class with a private static data member (a vector that contains all the characters a-z). In java or C#, I can just make a "static constructor" that will run before I make any instances of the class, and sets up the static data members of the class. It only gets run once (as the variables are read only and only need to be set once) and since it's a function of the class it can access its private members. I could add code in the constructor that checks to see if the vector is initialized, and initialize it if it's not, but that introduces many necessary checks and doesn't seem like the optimal solution to the problem.

The thought occurs to me that since the variables will be read only, they can just be public static const, so I can set them once outside the class, but once again, it seems sort of like an ugly hack.

Is it possible to have private static data members in a class if I don't want to initialize them in the instance constructor?

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3  
I thought you explained yourself perfectly well! –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 28 '09 at 22:35

17 Answers 17

up vote 96 down vote accepted

To get the equivalent of a static constructor, you need to write a separate ordinary class to hold the static data and then make a static instance of that ordinary class.

class StaticStuff
{
     std::vector<char> letters_;

public:
     StaticStuff()
     {
         for (char c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; c++)
             letters_.push_back(c);
     }

     // provide some way to get at letters_
};

class Elsewhere
{
    static StaticStuff staticStuff; // constructor runs once, single instance

};
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4  
thanks! though that's very annoying to have to do all that. One of the many "mistakes" C# and java learned from. –  Gordon Gustafson Jul 28 '09 at 22:59
60  
Yes. I always point out to people that if C++ hadn't made all those "mistakes" then other languages would have to make them. C++ covering so much ground, even making mistakes, has been great for the languages that followed it. –  quark Jul 28 '09 at 23:02
6  
Just one little nuance, as constructors come into play no one guarantees when the constructor for static object executes. A well-known much safer approach is class Elsewhere { StaticStuff& get_staticStuff() { static StaticStuff staticStuff; // constructor runs once, when someone first needs it return staticStuff; } }; I wonder if static constructors in C# and Java can provide the same guarantee as the code above... –  Oleg Zhylin Jul 28 '09 at 23:31
9  
@Oleg: Yes they do. The standard gurantees that the constructors for all non local variables are executed before main is entered. It also gurantees that within a compilation unit the order of construction is well defined and the same order as declaration within the compilation unit. Unfortunately they do not define the order across multiple compilation units. –  Loki Astari Jul 29 '09 at 2:25
9  
This is actually a case where friend makes a lot of sense so that class Elsewhere may easily access StaticStuff’s internals (without breaking encapsulation in any dangerous way, I might add). –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 26 '10 at 20:38

Well you can have

class MyClass
{
    public:
        static vector<char> a;

        static class _init
        {
          public:
            _init() { for(char i='a'; i<='z'; i++) a.push_back(i); }
        } _initializer;
};

Don't forget (in the .cpp) this:

vector<char> MyClass::a;
MyClass::_init MyClass::_initializer;

The program will still link without the second line, but the initializer will not be executed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 (didn't try it out) But: When is ctor _init._init() called? Before or after the ctor of MyClass when I have a static MyClass object? I guess you can't tell... –  ur. Jan 28 '10 at 16:18
1  
hello, where can I find more about this "initializer" magic? –  Karel Bílek Apr 30 '10 at 22:10
    
Shouldn't it be MyClass::a.push_back(i) instead of a.push_back(i) ? –  Neel Basu Apr 26 '11 at 6:48
    
A very nice low-boilerplate solution! +1. –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '11 at 2:05
2  
@ur.: _initializer is a subobject of MyClass. Subobjects are initialised in this order: virtual base class subobjects, in depth-first, left-to-right order (but only initialising each distinct subobject once); then plain base class subobjects, in depth-first, left-to-right order; then member subobjects in order of declaration. So it's safe to use EFraim's strategy, provided that code in _initialiser only refers to members declared before it. –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '11 at 2:52

In the .h file:

class MyClass {
private:
    static int myValue;
};

In the .cpp file:

#include "myclass.h"

int MyClass::myValue = 0;
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3  
This works fine for individual static members (regardless of type). The deficiency in comparison to static constructors is that you can't impose an order between the various static members. If you need to do that, see Earwicker's answer. –  quark Jul 28 '09 at 22:36

Here is another approach similar to Daniel Earwicker's, also using Konrad Rudolph's friend class suggestion. Here we use an inner private friend utility class to initialize the static members of your main class. For example:

Header file:

class ToBeInitialized
{
    // Inner friend utility class to initialize whatever you need

    class Initializer
    {
    public:
        Initializer();
    };

    friend class Initializer;

    // Static member variables of ToBeInitialized class

    static const int numberOfFloats;
    static float *theFloats;

    // Static instance of Initializer
    //   When this is created, its constructor initializes
    //   the ToBeInitialized class' static variables

    static Initializer initializer;
};

Implementation file:

// Normal static scalar initializer
const int ToBeInitialized::numberOfFloats = 17;

// Constructor of Initializer class.
//    Here is where you can initialize any static members
//    of the enclosing ToBeInitialized class since this inner
//    class is a friend of it.

ToBeInitialized::Initializer::Initializer()
{
    ToBeInitialized::theFloats =
        (float *)malloc(ToBeInitialized::numberOfFloats * sizeof(float));

    for (int i = 0; i < ToBeInitialized::numberOfFloats; ++i)
        ToBeInitialized::theFloats[i] = calculateSomeFancyValue(i);
}

This approach has the advantage of completely hiding the Initializer class from the outside world, keeping everything contained within the class to be initialized.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For giving an example that keeps the implementation in its own file. –  Andrew Larsson Feb 8 at 23:01
    
Also, you have to make sure that ToBeInitialized::Initializer::Initializer() gets called, so you need to add ToBeInitialized::Initializer ToBeInitialized::initializer; to the implementation file. I took some things from your idea and from EFraim's idea, and it works exactly as I need it to and looks clean. Thanks, man. –  Andrew Larsson Feb 9 at 10:19

No need for an init() function, std::vector can be created from a range:

// h file:
class MyClass {
    static std::vector<char> alphabet;
// ...
};

// cpp file:
#include <boost/range.hpp>
static const char alphabet[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
std::vector<char> MyClass::alphabet( boost::begin( ::alphabet ), boost::end( ::alphabet ) );

Note, however, that statics of class type cause trouble in libraries, so they should be avoided there.

C++11 Update

As of C++11, you can do this instead:

// cpp file:
std::vector<char> MyClass::alphabet = { 'a', 'b', 'c', ..., 'z' };

It's semantically equivalent to the C++98 solution in the original answer, but you can't use a string literal on the right-hand-side, so it's not completely superior. However, if you have a vector of any other type than char, wchar_t, char16_t or char32_t (arrays of which can be written as string literals), the C++11 version will strictly remove boilerplate code without introducing other syntax, compared to the C++98 version.

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I like it. Though if only we could do it in one line without the now usless alphabet. –  Loki Astari Aug 1 '09 at 9:04

The concept of static constructors was introduced in Java after they learned from the problems in C++. So we have no direct equivalent.

The best solution is to use POD types that can be initialised explicitly.
Or make your static members a specific type that has its own constructor that will initialize it correctly.

//header

class A
{
    // Make sure this is private so that nobody can missues the fact that
    // you are overriding std::vector. Just doing it here as a quicky example
    // don't take it as a recomendation for deriving from vector.
    class MyInitedVar: public std::vector<char>
    {
        public:
        MyInitedVar()
        {
           // Pre-Initialize the vector.
           for(char c = 'a';c <= 'z';++c)
           {
               push_back(c);
           }
        }
    };
    static int          count;
    static MyInitedVar  var1;

};


//source
int            A::count = 0;
A::MyInitedVar A::var1;
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When trying to compile and use class Elsewhere (from Earwicker's answer) I get:

error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "private: static class StaticStuff Elsewhere::staticStuff" (?staticStuff@Elsewhere@@0VStaticStuff@@A)

It seems is not possible to initialize static attributes of non-integer types without putting some code outside the class definition (CPP).

To make that compile you can use "a static method with a static local variable inside" instead. Something like this:

class Elsewhere
{
public:
    static StaticStuff& GetStaticStuff()
    {
        static StaticStuff staticStuff; // constructor runs once, single instance
        return staticStuff;
    }
};

And you may also pass arguments to the constructor or initialize it with specific values, it is very flexible, powerfull and easy to implement... the only thing is you have a static method containing a static variable, not a static attribute... syntaxis changes a bit, but still useful. Hope this is useful for someone,

Hugo González Castro.

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Though be careful if using threads. I believe in GCC the construction of static locals is protected against concurrent execution, but in Visual C++ it is not. –  Daniel Earwicker Oct 12 '11 at 13:56

I guess Simple solution to this will be:

    //X.h
    #pragma once
    class X
    {
    public:
            X(void);
            ~X(void);
    private:
            static bool IsInit;
            static bool Init();
    };

    //X.cpp
    #include "X.h"
    #include <iostream>

    X::X(void)
    {
    }


    X::~X(void)
    {
    }

    bool X::IsInit(Init());
    bool X::Init()
    {
            std::cout<< "ddddd";
            return true;
    }

    // main.cpp
    #include "X.h"
    int main ()
    {
            return 0;
    }
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This is how I do it, too. –  Etherealone Apr 20 '13 at 14:58

Test::StaticTest() is called exactly once during global static initialization.

Caller only has to add one line to the function that is to be their static constructor.

static_constructor<&Test::StaticTest>::c; forces initialization of c during global static initialization.

template<void(*ctor)()>
struct static_constructor
{
    struct constructor { constructor() { ctor(); } };
    static constructor c;
};

template<void(*ctor)()>
typename static_constructor<ctor>::constructor static_constructor<ctor>::c;

/////////////////////////////

struct Test
{
    static int number;

    static void StaticTest()
    {
        static_constructor<&Test::StaticTest>::c;

        number = 123;
        cout << "static ctor" << endl;
    }
};

int Test::number;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    cout << Test::number << endl;
    return 0;
}
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You define static member variables similarly to the way you define member methods.

foo.h

class Foo
{
public:
    void bar();
private:
    static int count;
};

foo.cpp

#include "foo.h"

void Foo::bar()
{
    // method definition
}

int Foo::count = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
CrazyJugglerDrummer question was not about a static plain old data type :) –  jww Dec 3 '13 at 7:44

Just solved same trick. I had to specify definition of a single static member for Singleton. But make things more complicated - I have decided that I do not want to call ctor of RandClass() unless I am gonna use it... that is why I did not want to initialize singleton globally in my code. Also I've added simple interface in my case.

Here is the final code:

I simplified code and use rand() function and its single seed initialzer srand()

interface IRandClass
{
 public:
    virtual int GetRandom() = 0;
};

class RandClassSingleton
{
private:
  class RandClass : public IRandClass
  {
    public:
      RandClass()
      {
        srand(GetTickCount());
      };

     virtual int GetRandom(){return rand();};
  };

  RandClassSingleton(){};
  RandClassSingleton(const RandClassSingleton&);

  // static RandClass m_Instance;

  // If you declare m_Instance here you need to place
  // definition for this static object somewhere in your cpp code as
  // RandClassSingleton::RandClass RandClassSingleton::m_Instance;

  public:

  static RandClass& GetInstance()
  {
      // Much better to instantiate m_Instance here (inside of static function).
      // Instantiated only if this function is called.

      static RandClass m_Instance;
      return m_Instance;
  };
};

main()
{
    // Late binding. Calling RandClass ctor only now
    IRandClass *p = &RandClassSingleton::GetInstance();
    int randValue = p->GetRandom();
}
abc()
{
    IRandClass *same_p = &RandClassSingleton::GetInstance();
}
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Here's another method, where the vector is private to the file that contains the implementation by using an anonymous namespace. It's useful for things like lookup tables that are private to the implementation:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

namespace {
  vector<int> vec;

  struct I { I() {
    vec.push_back(1);
    vec.push_back(3);
    vec.push_back(5);
  }} i;
}

int main() {

  vector<int>::const_iterator end = vec.end();
  for (vector<int>::const_iterator i = vec.begin();
       i != end; ++i) {
    cout << *i << endl;
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Though you might want to name I and i something a little more obscure so you don't accidentally use them somewhere lower in the file. –  Jim Hunziker Jul 31 '12 at 16:21
    
To be honest, it's hard to see why anyone would want to use private static members rather than anonmymous namespaces in implementation files. –  Jim Hunziker Jul 31 '12 at 16:25

To initialize a static variable, you just do so inside of a source file. For example:

//Foo.h
class Foo
{
 private:
  static int hello;
};


//Foo.cpp
int Foo::hello = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
CrazyJugglerDrummer question was not about a static plain old data type :) –  jww Dec 3 '13 at 7:44

How about creating a template to mimic the behavior of C#.

template<class T> class StaticConstructor
{
    bool m_StaticsInitialised = false;

public:
    typedef void (*StaticCallback)(void);

    StaticConstructor(StaticCallback callback)
    {
        if (m_StaticsInitialised)
            return;

        callback();

        m_StaticsInitialised = true;
    }
}

template<class T> bool StaticConstructor<T>::m_StaticsInitialised;

class Test : public StaticConstructor<Test>
{
    static std::vector<char> letters_;

    static void _Test()
    {
        for (char c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; c++)
            letters_.push_back(c);
    }

public:
    Test() : StaticConstructor<Test>(&_Test)
    {
        // non static stuff
    };
};
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For simple cases like here a static variable wrapped inside a static member function is nearly as good. It's simple and will usually be optimized away by compilers. This does not solve initialization order problem for complex objects though.

#include <iostream>

class MyClass 
{

    static const char * const letters(void){
        static const char * const var = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
        return var;
    }

    public:
        void show(){
            std::cout << letters() << "\n";
        }
};


int main(){
    MyClass c;
    c.show();
}
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Is this a solution?

class Foo
{
public:
    size_t count;
    Foo()
    {
        static size_t count = 0;
        this->count = count += 1;
    }
};
share|improve this answer

Here's my variant of EFraim's solution; the difference is that, thanks to implicit template instantiation, the static constructor is only called if instances of the class are created, and that no definition in the .cpp file is needed (thanks to template instantiation magic).

In the .h file, you have:

template <typename Aux> class _MyClass
{
    public:
        static vector<char> a;
        _MyClass() {
            (void) _initializer; //Reference the static member to ensure that it is instantiated and its initializer is called.
        }
    private:
        static struct _init
        {
            _init() { for(char i='a'; i<='z'; i++) a.push_back(i); }
        } _initializer;

};
typedef _MyClass<void> MyClass;

template <typename Aux> vector<char> _MyClass<Aux>::a;
template <typename Aux> typename _MyClass<Aux>::_init _MyClass<Aux>::_initializer;

In the .cpp file, you can have:

void foobar() {
    MyClass foo; // [1]

    for (vector<char>::iterator it = MyClass::a.begin(); it < MyClass::a.end(); ++it) {
        cout << *it;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

Note that MyClass::a is initialized only if line [1] is there, because that calls (and requires instantiation of) the constructor, which then requires instantiation of _initializer.

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