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I am wondering if there is a way (similar to Gmail) for AngularJS to delay showing a new route until after each model and its data has been fetched using its respective services.

For example, if there were a ProjectsController that listed all Projects and project_index.html which was the template that showed these Projects, Project.query() would be fetched completely before showing the new page.

Until then, the old page would still continue to show (for example, if I were browsing another page and then decided to see this Project index).

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9 Answers 9

$routeProvider resolve property allows delaying of route change until data is loaded.

First define a route with resolve attribute like this.

angular.module('phonecat', ['phonecatFilters', 'phonecatServices', 'phonecatDirectives']).
  config(['$routeProvider', function($routeProvider) {
    $routeProvider.
      when('/phones', {
        templateUrl: 'partials/phone-list.html', 
        controller: PhoneListCtrl, 
        resolve: PhoneListCtrl.resolve}).
      when('/phones/:phoneId', {
        templateUrl: 'partials/phone-detail.html', 
        controller: PhoneDetailCtrl, 
        resolve: PhoneDetailCtrl.resolve}).
      otherwise({redirectTo: '/phones'});
}]);

notice that the resolve property is defined on route.

function PhoneListCtrl($scope, phones) {
  $scope.phones = phones;
  $scope.orderProp = 'age';
}

PhoneListCtrl.resolve = {
  phones: function(Phone, $q) {
    // see: https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/angular/DGf7yyD4Oc4
    var deferred = $q.defer();
    Phone.query(function(successData) {
            deferred.resolve(successData); 
    }, function(errorData) {
            deferred.reject(); // you could optionally pass error data here
    });
    return deferred.promise;
  },
  delay: function($q, $defer) {
    var delay = $q.defer();
    $defer(delay.resolve, 1000);
    return delay.promise;
  }
}

Notice that the controller definition contains a resolve object which declares things wich should be available to the controller constructor. Here the phones is injected into the controller and it is defined in the resolve property.

The resolve.phones function is responsible for returning a promise. All of the promises are collected and the route change is delayed until after all of the promises are resolved.

Working demo: http://mhevery.github.com/angular-phonecat/app/#/phones Source: https://github.com/mhevery/angular-phonecat/commit/ba33d3ec2d01b70eb5d3d531619bf90153496831

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7  
@MiskoHevery - what if your controllers are inside a module and are defined as a string rather than function. How could you setup the resolve attribute like you do? –  onnnon Oct 3 '12 at 22:29
43  
How is this used in angular.controller() type controller definitions? In the $routeProvider stuff, I thought you had to use string names of controllers. –  Ben Lesh Nov 9 '12 at 14:11
6  
Any example using angular.controller() and with the latest version of AngularJS? –  Laurent Mar 7 '13 at 6:13
18  
@blesh, when you use angular.controller(), you can assign result of this function to a variable (var MyCtrl = angular.controller(...)) and then work with that further (MyCtrl.loadData = function(){..}). Check out egghead's video, the code is shown there straight away: egghead.io/video/0uvAseNXDr0 –  beret Apr 21 '13 at 2:33
10  
I'd still like a nice way to do with without having place your controller in a global. I don't want to litter with globals all over the place. You can do it with a constant, but it would be nice to be able to put the resolve function on/in the controller, not somewhere else. –  Erik Honn Sep 13 '13 at 14:22

Here's a minimal working example which works for Angular 1.0.2

Template:

<script type="text/ng-template" id="/editor-tpl.html">
    Editor Template {{datasets}}
</script>

<div ng-view>

</div>

JavaScript:

function MyCtrl($scope, datasets) {    
    $scope.datasets = datasets;
}

MyCtrl.resolve = {
    datasets : function($q, $http) {
        var deferred = $q.defer();

        $http({method: 'GET', url: '/someUrl'})
            .success(function(data) {
                deferred.resolve(data)
            })
            .error(function(data){
                //actually you'd want deffered.reject(data) here
                //but to show what would happen on success..
                deferred.resolve("error value");
            });

        return deferred.promise;
    }
};

var myApp = angular.module('myApp', [], function($routeProvider) {
    $routeProvider.when('/', {
        templateUrl: '/editor-tpl.html',
        controller: MyCtrl,
        resolve: MyCtrl.resolve
    });
});​
​

http://jsfiddle.net/dTJ9N/3/

Streamlined version:

Since $http() already returns a promise (aka deferred), we actually don't need to create our own. So we can simplify MyCtrl. resolve to:

MyCtrl.resolve = {
    datasets : function($q, $http) {
        return $http({
            method: 'GET', 
            url: 'http://fiddle.jshell.net/'
        });
    }
};

The result of $http() contains data, status, headers and config objects, so we need to change the body of MyCtrl to:

$scope.datasets = datasets.data;

http://jsfiddle.net/dTJ9N/5/

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to do something like this but having trouble with injecting 'datasets' as it is not defined. Any thoughts? –  Rob Jan 8 '13 at 10:50
    
Hey mb21, I think you might be able to help me out with this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/14271713/… –  Wind Up Toy Jan 11 '13 at 4:33
    
Could someone help me convert this answer to the app.controller('MyCtrl') format? jsfiddle.net/5usya/1 didn't work for me. –  user1071182 Apr 15 '13 at 3:03
    
i get an error: Unknown provider: datasetsProvider <- datasets –  chovy Nov 25 '13 at 6:32

I see some people asking how to do this using the angular.controller method with minification friendly dependency injection. Since I just got this working I felt obliged to come back and help. Here's my solution (adopted from the original question and Misko's answer):

angular.module('phonecat', ['phonecatFilters', 'phonecatServices', 'phonecatDirectives']).
  config(['$routeProvider', function($routeProvider) {
    $routeProvider.
      when('/phones', {
        templateUrl: 'partials/phone-list.html', 
        controller: PhoneListCtrl, 
        resolve: { 
            phones: ["Phone", "$q", function(Phone, $q) {
                var deferred = $q.defer();
                Phone.query(function(successData) {
                  deferred.resolve(successData); 
                }, function(errorData) {
                  deferred.reject(); // you could optionally pass error data here
                });
                return deferred.promise;
             ]
            },
            delay: ["$q","$defer", function($q, $defer) {
               var delay = $q.defer();
               $defer(delay.resolve, 1000);
               return delay.promise;
              }
            ]
        },

        }).
      when('/phones/:phoneId', {
        templateUrl: 'partials/phone-detail.html', 
        controller: PhoneDetailCtrl, 
        resolve: PhoneDetailCtrl.resolve}).
      otherwise({redirectTo: '/phones'});
}]);

angular.controller("PhoneListCtrl", [ "$scope", "phones", ($scope, phones) {
  $scope.phones = phones;
  $scope.orderProp = 'age';
}]);

Since this code is derived from the question/most popular answer it is untested, but it should send you in the right direction if you already understand how to make minification friendly angular code. The one part that my own code didn't requires was an injection of "Phone" into the resolve function for 'phones', nor did I use any 'delay' object at all.

I also recommend this youtube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6KITGRQujQ&list=UUKW92i7iQFuNILqQOUOCrFw&index=4&feature=plcp , which helped me quite a bit

Should it interest you I've decided to also paste my own code (Written in coffeescript) so you can see how I got it working.

FYI, in advance I use a generic controller that helps me do CRUD on several models:

appModule.config ['$routeProvider', ($routeProvider) ->
  genericControllers = ["boards","teachers","classrooms","students"]
  for controllerName in genericControllers
    $routeProvider
      .when "/#{controllerName}/",
        action: 'confirmLogin'
        controller: 'GenericController'
        controllerName: controllerName
        templateUrl: "/static/templates/#{controllerName}.html"
        resolve:
          items : ["$q", "$route", "$http", ($q, $route, $http) ->
             deferred = $q.defer()
             controllerName = $route.current.controllerName
             $http(
               method: "GET"
               url: "/api/#{controllerName}/"
             )
             .success (response) ->
               deferred.resolve(response.payload)
             .error (response) ->
               deferred.reject(response.message)

             return deferred.promise
          ]

  $routeProvider
    .otherwise
      redirectTo: '/'
      action: 'checkStatus'
]

appModule.controller "GenericController", ["$scope", "$route", "$http", "$cookies", "items", ($scope, $route, $http, $cookies, items) ->

  $scope.items = items
      #etc ....
    ]
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Do I infer correctly from your example and my failed attempts that it's now impossible to reference a resolve function in the controller, in recent versions of Angular? So it has to be declared right in the config as it is here? –  XMLilley Aug 6 '13 at 23:26
    
@XMLilley I'm pretty sure that's the case. This example was from 1.1.2 when I wrote it, I believe. I did not see any documentation on putting resolve inside of a controller –  spadict Aug 7 '13 at 14:25
    
Cool, thanks. There's lots of examples of doing so on SO (like the top two here), but they're all from 2012 and early 2013. It's an elegant approach, but appears to be deprecated. The cleanest alternative now seems to be writing individual services that are promise objects. –  XMLilley Aug 7 '13 at 15:04

This commit, which is part of version 1.1.5 and above, exposes the $promise object of $resource. Versions of ngResource including this commit allow resolving resources like this:

$routeProvider

resolve: {
    data: function(Resource) {
        return Resource.get().$promise;
    }
}

controller

app.controller('ResourceCtrl', ['$scope', 'data', function($scope, data) {

    $scope.data = data;

}]);
share|improve this answer
    
Which versions include that commit, please? –  XMLilley Aug 6 '13 at 23:13
    
The latest unstable version (1.1.5) includes this commit. ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.1.5/angular.min.js –  Maximilian Hoffmann Aug 10 '13 at 22:56
    
I like this less verbose approach. Would be nice to create a promise from the actual data object and pass that in directly, but this is so little code that it works nicely. –  Sam Barnum Aug 23 '13 at 14:55
1  
How would the resource access $routeParams? For example: in GET '/api/1/apps/:appId' --> App.get({id: $routeParams.appId}).$promise(); I can't use like this –  zeronone Feb 13 at 1:36
1  
@zeronone you inject $route to your resolve and use $route.current.params. Be careful, $routeParams is still pointing to the old route. –  Brice Stacey Apr 26 at 13:50

This snippet is dependency injection friendly (I even use it in combination of ngmin and uglify) and it's a more elegant domain driven based solution.

The example below registers a Phone resource and a constant phoneRoutes, which contains all your routing information for that (phone) domain. Something I didn't like in the provided answer was the location of the resolve logic -- the main module should not know anything or be bothered about the way the resource arguments are provided to the controller. This way the logic stays in the same domain.

Note: if you're using ngmin (and if you're not: you should) you only have to write the resolve functions with the DI array convention.

angular.module('myApp').factory('Phone',function ($resource) {
  return $resource('/api/phone/:id', {id: '@id'});
}).constant('phoneRoutes', {
    '/phone': {
      templateUrl: 'app/phone/index.tmpl.html',
      controller: 'PhoneIndexController'
    },
    '/phone/create': {
      templateUrl: 'app/phone/edit.tmpl.html',
      controller: 'PhoneEditController',
      resolve: {
        phone: ['$route', 'Phone', function ($route, Phone) {
          return new Phone();
        }]
      }
    },
    '/phone/edit/:id': {
      templateUrl: 'app/phone/edit.tmpl.html',
      controller: 'PhoneEditController',
      resolve: {
        form: ['$route', 'Phone', function ($route, Phone) {
          return Phone.get({ id: $route.current.params.id }).$promise;
        }]
      }
    }
  });

The next piece is injecting the routing data when the module is in the configure state and applying it to the $routeProvider.

angular.module('myApp').config(function ($routeProvider, 
                                         phoneRoutes, 
                                         /* ... otherRoutes ... */) {

  $routeProvider.when('/', { templateUrl: 'app/main/index.tmpl.html' });

  // Loop through all paths provided by the injected route data.

  angular.forEach(phoneRoutes, function(routeData, path) {
    $routeProvider.when(path, routeData);
  });

  $routeProvider.otherwise({ redirectTo: '/' });

});

Testing the route configuration with this setup is also pretty easy:

describe('phoneRoutes', function() {

  it('should match route configuration', function() {

    module('myApp');

    // Mock the Phone resource
    function PhoneMock() {}
    PhoneMock.get = function() { return {}; };

    module(function($provide) {
      $provide.value('Phone', FormMock);
    });

    inject(function($route, $location, $rootScope, phoneRoutes) {
      angular.forEach(phoneRoutes, function (routeData, path) {

        $location.path(path);
        $rootScope.$digest();

        expect($route.current.templateUrl).toBe(routeData.templateUrl);
        expect($route.current.controller).toBe(routeData.controller);
      });
    });
  });
});

You can see it in full glory in my latest (upcoming) experiment. Although this method works fine for me, I really wonder why the $injector isn't delaying construction of anything when it detects injection of anything that is a promise object; it would make things soooOOOOOooOOOOO much easier.

Edit: used Angular v1.2(rc2)

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2  
This excellent answer seems much more in line with the "Angular" philosophy (encapsulation, etc). We should all be making a conscious effort to stop logic from creeping all over the codebase like kudzu. –  yourfriendzak Oct 22 '13 at 23:06
    
I really wonder why the $injector isn't delaying construction of anything when it detects injection of anything that is a promise object I'm guessing they omitted this functionality because it might encourages design patterns that negatively effect the responsiveness of apps. The ideal app in their mind is one that's truly asynchronous, so resolving should be an edge case. –  yourfriendzak Oct 22 '13 at 23:09
1  
+1 I like this answer better than Misko's –  gion_13 Jan 21 at 8:49
    
+1 This answer is more angular way. –  duckegg Jul 31 at 14:29

Delaying showing the route is sure to lead to an asynchronous tangle... why not simply track the loading status of your main entity and use that in the view. For example in your controller you might use both the success and error callbacks on ngResource:

$scope.httpStatus = 0; // in progress
$scope.projects = $resource.query('/projects', function() {
    $scope.httpStatus = 200;
  }, function(response) {
    $scope.httpStatus = response.status;
  });

Then in the view you could do whatever:

<div ng-show="httpStatus == 0">
    Loading
</div>
<div ng-show="httpStatus == 200">
    Real stuff
    <div ng-repeat="project in projects">
         ...
    </div>
</div>
<div ng-show="httpStatus >= 400">
    Error, not found, etc. Could distinguish 4xx not found from 
    5xx server error even.
</div>
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4  
Perhaps exposing HTTP status to the view isn't right, anymore than dealing with CSS classes and DOM elements belong in the controller. I'd probably use the same idea but abstract status away in isValid() and isLoaded(). –  darkporter Sep 8 '12 at 2:03
    
This is indeed not the best separation of concerns, plus that it will crash if you have nested controllers that depend on the specific object. –  null Oct 6 '13 at 21:07

I worked from Misko's code above and this is what I've done with it. This is a more current solution since $defer has been changed to $timeout. Substituting $timeout however will wait for the timeout period (in Misko's code, 1 second), then return the data hoping it's resolved in time. With this way, it returns asap.

function PhoneListCtrl($scope, phones) {
  $scope.phones = phones;
  $scope.orderProp = 'age';
}

PhoneListCtrl.resolve = {

  phones: function($q, Phone) {
    var deferred = $q.defer();

    Phone.query(function(phones) {
        deferred.resolve(phones);
    });

    return deferred.promise;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Using AngularJS 1.1.5

Updating the 'phones' function in Justen's answer using AngularJS 1.1.5 syntax.

Original:

phones: function($q, Phone) {
    var deferred = $q.defer();

    Phone.query(function(phones) {
        deferred.resolve(phones);
    });

    return deferred.promise;
}

Updated:

phones: function(Phone) {
    return Phone.query().$promise;
}

Much shorter thanks to the Angular team and contributors. :)

This is also the answer of Maximilian Hoffmann. Apparently that commit made it into 1.1.5.

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1  
I can't seem to find anything about $promise in the docs. It might've been taken out as of v2.0+. –  yourfriendzak Oct 22 '13 at 22:41
    
It is only available in 1.2 –  Thomas Nov 6 '13 at 9:49

I like darkporter's idea because it will be easy for a dev team new to AngularJS to understand and worked straight away.

I created this adaptation which uses 2 divs, one for loader bar and another for actual content displayed after data is loaded. Error handling would be done elsewhere.

Add a 'ready' flag to $scope:

$http({method: 'GET', url: '...'}).
    success(function(data, status, headers, config) {
        $scope.dataForView = data;      
        $scope.ready = true;  // <-- set true after loaded
    })
});

In html view:

<div ng-show="!ready">

    <!-- Show loading graphic, e.g. Twitter Boostrap progress bar -->
    <div class="progress progress-striped active">
        <div class="bar" style="width: 100%;"></div>
    </div>

</div>

<div ng-show="ready">

    <!-- Real content goes here and will appear after loading -->

</div>

See also: Boostrap progress bar docs

share|improve this answer
    
Falls apart a bit if you're loading multiple pieces of data. How do you know if everything loaded? –  toxaq Oct 13 '13 at 23:32
    
Things have moved on since I added this answer in Feb, with a lot more activity on this page. Looks like there is better support in Angular for solving this problem now than what is suggested here. Cheers, –  reggoodwin Oct 16 '13 at 8:08
    
I arrive a bit late, but dealing with multiple pieces of data is not of big concern. You just have to use separate variables (booleans : isReadyData1, isReadyData2 etc.) for each request, and set the $scope.ready = isReadyData1 && isReadyData2 ...; works well for me. –  GuillaumeA Nov 16 '13 at 20:34

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