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I have a Maven-based project, in which I trying to add some JAXB classes automatically generated by the "jaxb2-maven-plugin" Maven plugin. However, my first cut has me in a circular dependency loop:

  • Because these JAXB classes aren't generated yet, my other sources which reference them have compilation errors.
  • Because those other sources have compilation errors, these JAXB classes don't get generated.

It seems like there are two obvious possibilities for solving this:

  1. Comment-out the broken references, so that the project builds and the JAXB classes are automatically generated. Then copy those generated sources from /target into /src/main/java, so that references to them won't cause compilation errors.
  2. Create an entirely separate project, consisting of nothing but the JAXB stuff. Include it as a dependency in my main project.

Am I missing something here? Option #1 seems flat-out ridiculous... that just can't be the manner in which people use JAXB. Option #2 seems more rational, but still rather inefficient and cumbersome. I really have to take on the overhead of an entirely separate project just to use JAXB?

Are there any more elegant approaches that developers use to reference JAXB-generated classes in the same project where the Maven plugin generates them?

UPDATE: By request, here is the relevant portion of my POM:

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <!-- configure the compiler to compile to Java 1.6 -->
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
            <configuration>
                <source>1.6</source>
                <target>1.6</target>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>       
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
            <artifactId>jaxb2-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>1.4</version>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <phase>generate-sources</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>xjc</goal>
                    </goals>
                </execution>
            </executions>
            <configuration>
                <!-- The name of your generated source package -->
                <packageName>com.mypackage</packageName> 
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>  
</build>

When I run mvn clean package, I DO see my JAXB sources being generated beneath the /target subdirectory. However, those generated sources are not being automatically added to the classpath for the compile phase.

POST-RESOLUTION UPDATE: It turns out that my compilation issues had more to do with the fact that I was running in Eclipse, and its Maven integration has some issues with "jaxb2-maven-plugin". See this StackOverflow question for more detail on that issue and its resolution.

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Please post the relevant sections of the POM. –  jiggy Aug 15 '12 at 15:42
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

i would suggest you to split jaxb-generated classes (api) and your BL classes (implementation) to 2 maven projects with separate pom.xml for each, and the main root pom.xml with the compilation order. that way, you will be able to build api.jar, then maven will install it inside the local repo, and after that you can use it as the dependency of your implementation. so it will looks like:

-API\
--pom.xml - for api, jaxb generation
-IMPL\
--pom.xml - for impl, api dependency is here
pom.xml - main pom.xml with references to the projects above
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Thanks. It turns out that my issues had more to do with Eclipse than anything else (see my update at the bottom of the question). As for the "circular dependency" problem, I decided to start by writing the Java classes first... rather than starting with the XML schema and going the other way. I then put these model classes into the client JAR (which is also in the server application's classpath), and everyone's happy. –  Steve Perkins Aug 17 '12 at 17:53
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How did you configure your jaxb maven plugin? Normally it runs in the generate-sources lifecycle, which comes before the compile lifecycle. So your JAXB generated classes should already be there when your own code gets compiled, Maven puts them in target/generated-source and puts that folder on the classpath.

Edit: This is my code we use at work (and which works as expected):

<plugin>
            <groupId>com.sun.tools.xjc.maven2</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-jaxb-plugin</artifactId>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <phase>generate-sources</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>generate</goal>
                    </goals>
                </execution>
            </executions>
            <configuration>
                <schemaDirectory>src/main/resources/<companyname>/xsd</schemaDirectory>
                <includeSchemas>
                    <includeSchema>retrieval.xsd</includeSchema>
                    <includeSchema>storage.xsd</includeSchema>
                </includeSchemas>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>

Apparently we use yet another jaxb plugin... (see also this thread: Difference of Maven JAXB plugins).

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I've updated the original question to include the plugin portion of my POM. –  Steve Perkins Aug 15 '12 at 17:25
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Maybe try using the maven-jaxb2-plugin instead:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.jvnet.jaxb2.maven2</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jaxb2-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>0.8.2</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <goals>
                <goal>generate</goal>
            </goals>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

The answer from dfuse is correct, though. Either plugin should generate sources before compiling, and the result of the source generation will be on the classpath. I tested this with both plugins. Is it possible for you to post your schema, or at least the schema for the type that your code is failing to pick up on the classpath?

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I use and would recommend the org.jvnet plugin too. If your problem isn't solved by Friday, I can compare with the poms at work, see what might be missing. –  Nicolas Mommaerts Aug 15 '12 at 18:38
    
Correction, I don't use that plugin (although I have tried it). I posted my code in my answer. –  Nicolas Mommaerts Aug 17 '12 at 8:58
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