Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to PHP and trying to learn things.

Is it posible to avoid the use of temporary variables ?

<?php

    function get_name()
    {
        // assume that this function return 3 
        // values on different conditions "name0" "name1" or "name2";
    }

    $result =  ( get_name() == "name0" || get_name() == "name1") ? "Primary" : "Secondary" ;
    echo $result;

?>

on the above i am calling the get_name() function two times , which means two calls on the same function.

Is it possible to achieve the same with just one call without saving it into a temporary variable?

What is the commonly used practices ?

Update : I edited the question to be more specific.Almost all answers are satisfactory,Hope that this update will help for new readers.

share|improve this question
4  
$result = in_array(get_value(), array(0, NULL), true) ? 'Zero' : 'One';. Though the requirement "without saving it into temporary variable" is unusual - there's nothing wrong with them... –  DCoder Aug 15 '12 at 15:19
2  
In my opinion, using a temporary variable with a meaningful name, makes your code more readable. –  martinstoeckli Aug 15 '12 at 15:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would do that:

$result =  in_array(get_value(), array(0, NULL), true) ? "Zero" : "One" ;

Documentation: in_array

share|improve this answer
    
could you please explain little-bit ? –  Red Aug 15 '12 at 15:25
1  
What exactly is unclear? This calls the function in_array($needle, $haystack, $strict = false), which checks if the $needle is in the second argument `$haystack, using either strict or loose comparison. Depending on your actual use-case and return values, you might need to use the strict comparison option. –  DCoder Aug 15 '12 at 15:28
1  
$strict needs to be set to true, otherwise a return value of false or "0" will cause in_array() to return true. –  nickb Aug 15 '12 at 15:32
    
@nickb: thanks, I just updated my answer. –  Jocelyn Aug 15 '12 at 15:35
1  
I added a link to the documentation for in_array. The function is called only once in my code. –  Jocelyn Aug 15 '12 at 16:01

How about this?

$result = get_value() ? "One" : "Zero";

This causes get_value() to be typecast to a boolean. null and 0 become false, and 1 becomes true.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry , but that was just an example . May be i presented it wrong,the function returns different values on different conditions. –  Red Aug 15 '12 at 15:25
    
Ah, too bad. Then I would recommend Jocelyn's in_array solution. –  awm Aug 15 '12 at 15:26
    
This looks very nifty, but it can also lead to misunderstandings if somebody else has to read this code (you need additional knowledge about get_value() to understand it). –  martinstoeckli Aug 15 '12 at 15:26
    
Really sorry for the inconvenience , i just meant that get_value() returns different values ... –  Red Aug 15 '12 at 15:30
    
No problem! And back to the boolean typecasting -- it's good a have a really thorough understanding of how php converts to boolean any time you're using ternary operators like this. –  awm Aug 15 '12 at 15:32

The function is called two times because the === operator is used, and it will output Zero only if the return value is exactly 0 or null, but not if it's false or empty string.

A common approach is

$result =  ( get_value() ) ? "Zero" : "One" ;

which will output Zero for false and empty string as well.

If you need the strict check, and assuming that get_value() is an expensive function, you can do:

$result =  ( in_array(get_value(), array(0, null), true ) ? "Zero" : "One" ;

There are again 2 function calls, but one is to the in_array function.

it would be more readable if you just save the result in temporary variable.

Even better, do not return mixed result from the get_value() function

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry , but that was just an example . May be i presented it wrong,the function returns different values on different conditions. –  Red Aug 15 '12 at 15:27

try

<? echo (get_value())?"One":"Zero";?>
share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry , but that was just an example . May be i presented it wrong,the function returns different values on different conditions. –  Red Aug 15 '12 at 15:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.