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I just ran my website made with Django1.3 for the first time on Heroku. I had to change every mentioning of myproject into app(such as import myproject.core.views into import app.core.views in urls.py ) in order to make my website run without an importError.

I figure either:

  • I change the Heroku directory ($ heroku run pwd ouputs /app) /app into /myproject. How do I do this?
  • Use a general prefix. How would I would I do this the best way?
  • I should push my project from a directory lower?

Update

This is the file structure of my local and heroku directory: gist.github.com/3361637

Here is an example of the changes I had to make in urls.py: gist.github.com/3361686

The changes for the other files were exactly the same, just changing the name of my project

Update2

To mipadi:

Next to your proposed structure I changed my .git folder from this:

.
|-- myproject_django
    |-- core
        # etc.
    |-- manage.py
    |-- .git
    # etc
|-- requirements.txt

to this:

.
|-- myproject_django
    |-- core
        # etc.
    |-- manage.py
    # etc
|-- requirements.txt
|-- .git

and pushed the changes to heroku. But now the folders/files are mixed with the previous structure. I tried to delete these files using heroku run rm file_name but this doesn't work. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
I think you should definitely use a specific prefix for your project. There are a ton of possible situations where a generic module name could cause trouble. Namespacing is important, because you never know who else might have named a module "app" or "myproject". –  Casey Kinsey Aug 15 '12 at 16:07
    
When I said general prefix, I meant using something like os.path so you can use a variable as a general prefix. –  Bentley4 Aug 15 '12 at 16:16
1  
And why not rename it to something_descriptive and run it that way both locally and on Heroku? Configuration should differ between environments, not the structure of your project. –  Casey Kinsey Aug 15 '12 at 16:26
1  
Can you post the contents of your Procfile and/or WSGI script? There's nothing in the Heroku deployment process that requires your app package to be named app. I suspect it's just a configuration problem. –  Casey Kinsey Aug 15 '12 at 16:33
1  
Also, to get better answers on this question I'd suggest posting the actual traceback from your error as well as the file structure of your repository, for starters. –  Casey Kinsey Aug 15 '12 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to Heroku's instructions (and every Django/Heroku project I've set up), the Django project should be at the top level, so, in your case, this:

.
|-- pykaboo_django
    |-- core
        # etc.
    |-- manage.py
    # etc
|-- requirements.txt

Then, you can just import by app name:

from core.models import *
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like the solution I was looking for. Could you check my second update of the original post? –  Bentley4 Aug 15 '12 at 18:23
1  
@Bentley4, did you move your .git directory by hand? I don't see how the original files would still be on heroku if you changed the app structure, committed, and re-pushed. –  Casey Kinsey Aug 15 '12 at 19:07

It looks like you should be referencing your module directly as core since it resides at the root of your project. So, in urls.py you should be importing like:

import core.views

instead of import app.core.views or import myproject.core.views

share|improve this answer
    
You should be able to do that, anyway. The issue here is that Django adds the parent directory of the project to the PYTHONPATH; on his dev machine, the parent is "myproject", but on Heroku, the parent directory is "app". –  mipadi Aug 15 '12 at 18:02
1  
this is what I do. reference from app level not project level: ROOT_URLCONF = 'urls' instead of ROOT_URLCONF = 'myproject.urls' for stuff outside an app. For stuff in an app: from blog.models import BlogPost, Author instead of from myproject.blog.models import BlogPost, Author. I can confirm that this works on heroku. –  Francis Yaconiello Aug 15 '12 at 18:10
    
Yep, Francis, this mirrors my setup as well. –  Casey Kinsey Aug 15 '12 at 19:08
1  
Dear Casey, thank you for taking so much time to help me. Your answer is certainly useful and works but mipadi's structure was what I was originally looking for. If I could accept two answers I would except yours as well, sorry. –  Bentley4 Aug 15 '12 at 22:47
1  
No worries, glad you got it sorted out. –  Casey Kinsey Aug 18 '12 at 15:47

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