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I have some code like this:

class A{

public: 
A();

private:
vector<vector<int> > mat;
int a;

}

How the default constructor should look like?Like this?

A::A(): mat(10(10)),a(0){};

But there's one more problem for me.. I don't know the number of "rows". (vector<vector<int> > should have n elements, and vector<int> should have 4 elements) And also I have a problem of accessing the elements of vector<vector<int> >. So can you tell me how to do? Thanks.:)

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2 Answers 2

Use the constructor under (2) on this reference page:

A::A() : mat(10, std::vector<int>(10)), a(0) { }

You can pass variables also, of course. For example:

A::A(size_t n_rows, size_t n_cols) : mat(n_rows, std::vector<int>(n_cols)), a(0) {}

To access elements, you use two succesive calls to operator[]:

std::cout << mat[1][1];  // will print 0, as vector's elements are default initialized

First call returns a reference to vector<int>, the second one a reference to int.

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Thanks...:) And do I need to initialize mat? Or can I leave it? What's better? –  stefaneli31 Aug 15 '12 at 18:02
    
The elements are initialized to 0 in the constructor. If that makes sense in your program, then that's obviously it. –  jrok Aug 15 '12 at 18:43

You can add a constructor that takes the number of rows:

A(unsigned int rows): mat(rows, std::vector<int>(4)), a(0) {};

For accessing the elements, you can add some access operators or methods. For example

class A{

public: 
 public:
 A(unsigned int rows): mat(rows, std::vector<int>(4)), a(0) {};
 const int& operator()(unsigned int row, unsigned int col) const {
   return mat[row][col];
 }
 private:
vector<vector<int> > mat;
int a;

};

Then

A a;
int i = a(3,4);

You may want to add some range checking to the access operator.

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