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I'm trying to construct the correct sql statement (Oracle) to get the count of device_id's for each customer_id that is greater than a given value. For example, I want to know the customer_id's that have more than 3 device_ids. A single device_id can only have one customer_id associated to it, while a customer_id may have many device_ids.

Table:
device_id
customer_id
....

Data (device_id, customer_id):
00001, CUST1
00002, CUST1
00003, CUST1
00004, CUST1
00005, CUST2
00006, CUST2
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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

To get the customers with more than 3 devices:

select customer_id, count(device_id)
from YourTable
Group by customer_id
having count(device_id) > 3
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You will want to use a GROUP BY and HAVING clause

select customer_id, count(device_id)
from YourTable
group by customer_id
having count(device_id) > 3
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I do believe you did not copy my SQL code, I'm just amazed that we both picked the same names and approaches :) –  Adrian Carneiro Aug 15 '12 at 17:33
    
@Adrian I did not copy yours, when you had initially posted you did not have the HAVING clause. I typically use yourtable as my generic name. –  bluefeet Aug 15 '12 at 17:34
    
Just as I said before, I really do think there was no copy. The having came 10 seconds later, as an edit. It's a simple problem, so same SQL are feasible. I was just really entertained with the exact looks :) –  Adrian Carneiro Aug 15 '12 at 17:37
    
@Adrian just lucky I guess. :) Or we all just spend too much time on SO –  bluefeet Aug 15 '12 at 17:40
    
I would guess it's the second ;) –  Adrian Carneiro Aug 15 '12 at 17:42

What you need is the having clause:

select customer_id, count(*)
from t
group by customer_id
having count(*) > 3
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