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How do I allocate a polymorphic object on the stack? I'm trying to do something similar to (trying to avoid heap allocation with new)?:

A* a = NULL;

switch (some_var)
{
case 1:
    a = A();
    break;
case 2:
    a = B(); // B is derived from A
    break;
default:
    a = C(); // C is derived from A
    break;
}
share|improve this question
    
other than the solutions mentioned you can try using directives ifdef and define – Moataz Elmasry Aug 15 '12 at 17:39
4  
@MoatazElmasry #defines are in no way polymorphic at runtime, and so don't allow for the switch as described in the question. – ssube Aug 15 '12 at 17:40
3  
Why are you trying to avoid heap allocation? – Pete Becker Aug 15 '12 at 17:44
3  
@user - If you want to do three different things, why not just write three different functions? Switch-statement-polymorphism is almost always a sign that you do something wrong. – Bo Persson Aug 15 '12 at 17:55
    
@user1049229 I came cross the same issue. I used the similar code. It works correctly on Window. But on Mac, the call always goes to the base class, so not correctly behaved. – user1914692 Jun 9 at 21:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't structure a single function to work like that, since automatic or temporary objects created inside a conditional block can't have their lifetimes extended into the containing block.

I'd suggest refactoring the polymorphic behaviour into a separate function:

void do_something(A&&);

switch (some_var)
{
case 1:
    do_something(A());
    break;
case 2:
    do_something(B()); // B is derived from A
    break;
default:
    do_something(C()); // C is derived from A
    break;
}
share|improve this answer

Disclaimer: I definitely don't think this is a good solution. The good solutions are to either rethink the design (maybe OO polymorphism is not warranted here given that there is a bounded number of possibilities?), or to use a second function to pass along said polymorphic object by reference.

But since other folks mentioned this idea, but got details wrong, I'm posting this answer to show how to get it right. Hopefully I get it right.

It is clear the the number of possible types is bounded. This means that a discriminated union, like boost::variant could solve the problem, even if it's not pretty:

boost::variant<A, B, C> thingy = 
    some_var == 1? static_cast<A&&>(A())
    : some_var == 2? static_cast<A&&>(B())
    : static_cast<A&&>(C());

The fact that now you can use things like static visitors is one if the things that keeps making me think this isn't a good use of OO polymorphism.

If instead of a ready-made solution, you want to use placement new by hand as suggested in other answers, there are a number of things that need care because we lose some of the properties of regular automatic objects in the process:

  • the compiler no longer gives us the right size and alignment;
  • we no longer get an automatic call to the destructors;

In C++11, these are both easy to fix with aligned_union and unique_ptr, respectively.

std::aligned_union<A, B, C>::type thingy;
A* ptr;
switch (some_var)
{
case 1:
    ptr = ::new(&thingy.a) A();
    break;
case 2:
    ptr = ::new(&thingy.b) B();
    break;
default:
    ptr = ::new(&thingy.c) C();
    break;
}
std::unique_ptr<A, void(*)(A*)> guard { ptr, [](A* a) { a->~A(); } };
// all this mechanism is a great candidate for encapsulation in a class of its own
// but boost::variant already exists, so...

For compilers that don't support these features, you can get alternatives: Boost includes aligned_storage and alignment_of traits which can be used to build aligned_union; and unique_ptr can be replaced with some kind of scope guard class.

Now that that is out of the way, just so it's clear, don't do this and simply pass a temporary along to another function, or revisit the design altogether.

share|improve this answer

If B is your base types D1, D2, and D3 are your derived types:

void foo()
{
    D1  derived_object1;
    D2  derived_object2;
    D3  derived_object3;
    B *base_pointer;

    switch (some_var)
    {
        case 1:  base_pointer = &derived_object1;  break;
        ....
    }
}

If you want to avoid wasting the space of the three derived objects, you could break up your method into two parts; the part that chooses which type you need, and the part of the method that works on it. Having decided which type you need, you call a method that allocates that object, creates a pointer to it, and calls the second half of the method to complete the work on the stack-allocated object.

share|improve this answer

You can do it with placement new. This will place the items on the stack, in the memory contained in the buffer. However, these variables are not automatic. The downside is that your destructors won't run automatically, you would need to properly destruct them just as you've created them when they go out of scope.

A reasonable alternative to manually calling the destructor is to wrap your type in a smart pointer, as shown below:

class A
{
public:
   virtual ~A() {}
};

class B : public A {};
class C : public B {};

template<class T>
class JustDestruct
{
public:
   void operator()(const T* a)
   {
      a->T::~T();
   }
};

void create(int x)
{
    char buff[1024] // ensure that this is large enough to hold your "biggest" object
    std::unique_ptr<A, JustDestruct<T>> t(buff);

    switch(x)
    {
    case 0:
       ptr = new (buff) A();
       break;

    case 1:
       ptr = new (buff) B();
       break;

    case 2:
       ptr = new (buff) C();
       break;
    }

    // do polymorphic stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, in practice one should use RAII so the destructors are called automatically. I believe std::unique_ptr with a custom deleter can work. – GManNickG Aug 15 '12 at 17:45
    
That would be preferred, yes. However, in the case that the OP is suggesting (where he wants to avoid heap allocations) there likely isn't much to clean up. – Chad Aug 15 '12 at 17:46
    
@Chad: it's easy to make a unique_ptr that merely calls the destructor. – Mooing Duck Aug 15 '12 at 17:47
2  
@Chad: Eh, why even care about the case? Just do it right the first time and then you don't have to worry about it. – GManNickG Aug 15 '12 at 17:49
4  
This code completely ignores the fact that there's no guarantee the array will be properly aligned for all types involved. – R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 15 '12 at 18:10

You can't create a polymorphic local variable

You can't create a polymorphic local variable, since a subclass B of A might have more attributes than A, thus take more place, so the compiler would have to reserve enough space for the largest subclass of A.

  1. In case you have dozens of subclasses, and one of them has a large number of attributes, this would waste a lot of space.
  2. In case you put in the local variable an instance of a subclass of A you received as a parameter, and you put your code in a dynamic library, then the code linking with it could declare a subclass larger than those in your library, so the compiler wouldn't have allocated enough space on the stack anyway.

So allocate space for it yourself

Using placement new, you can initialize the object in a space you allocated through some other means:

However, these techniques may use a lot of extra space, and don't work if you are given a reference (pointer) to an unknown-at-compile-time subclass of A that is larger than the types you accounted for.

The solution I propose is to have a kind of factory method on each subclass, that calls a supplied function with a pointer to a stack-allocated instance of the given subclass. I added an extra void* parameter to the supplied function's signature, so one can pass it arbitrary data.

@MooingDuck suggested this implementation using templates and C++11 in a comment below. In case you need this for code that can't benefit from C++11 features, or for some plain C code with structs instead of classes (if struct B has a first field of type struct A, then it can be manipulated somewhat like a "substruct" of A), then my version below will do the trick (but without being type-safe).

This version works with newly defined subclasses, as long as they implement the ugly factory-like method, and it will use a constant amount of stack for the return address and other informations required by this intermediate function, plus the size of an instance of the requested class, but not the size of the largest subclass (unless you choose to use that one).

#include <iostream>
class A {
    public:
    int fieldA;
    static void* ugly(void* (*f)(A*, void*), void* param) {
        A instance;
        return f(&instance, param);
    }
    // ...
};
class B : public A {
    public:
    int fieldB;
    static void* ugly(void* (*f)(A*, void*), void* param) {
        B instance;
        return f(&instance, param);
    }
    // ...
};
class C : public B {
    public:
    int fieldC;
    static void* ugly(void* (*f)(A*, void*), void* param) {
        C instance;
        return f(&instance, param);
    }
    // ...
};
void* doWork(A* abc, void* param) {
    abc->fieldA = (int)param;
    if ((int)param == 4) {
        ((C*)abc)->fieldC++;
    }
    return (void*)abc->fieldA;
}
void* otherWork(A* abc, void* param) {
    // Do something with abc
    return (void*)(((int)param)/2);
}
int main() {
    std::cout << (int)A::ugly(doWork, (void*)3);
    std::cout << (int)B::ugly(doWork, (void*)1);
    std::cout << (int)C::ugly(doWork, (void*)4);
    std::cout << (int)A::ugly(otherWork, (void*)2);
    std::cout << (int)C::ugly(otherWork, (void*)11);
    std::cout << (int)B::ugly(otherWork, (void*)19);
    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

By then, I think we might have outweighed the costs of a simple malloc, so you might wand to use that after all.

share|improve this answer
2  
you can in fact create a polymorphic type on the stack -- see the answers which demonstrate placement new. it's well defined/supported by the language. – justin Aug 15 '12 at 17:49
    
This argument misses one detail: temporaries work fine, and the compiler is perfectly able to decide what size the stack will need. – R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 15 '12 at 18:07
    
@Justin : I clarified my answer, I meant you couldn't do this with a "classical" variable without manual allocation. – Georges Dupéron Aug 15 '12 at 21:25
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes : Indeed, temporaries work fine, but a variable is not temporary, it lasts during the whole life of the function. If you have two such dynamic variables and both hold a small instance at the beginning and then you put a big instance of a subclass created in another library: how could the compiler have known it should have reserved enough space for the first variable so it doesn't crashes into the second? It would need to shift the position of the variables on the stack at link time, and I bet it doesn't. Temporaries work because we know their concrete type at compile-time. – Georges Dupéron Aug 15 '12 at 21:29
1  
Your code looks like a very ugly and not type-safe version of this – Mooing Duck Aug 16 '12 at 0:33

Polymorphism doesn't work with values, you need a reference or a pointer. You can use a const reference to a temporary object polymorphically and it will have the lifetime of a stack object.

const A& = (use_b ? B() : A());

If you need to modify the object, you have no choice but to dynamically allocate it (unless you're using Microsoft's non-standard extension that lets you bind a temporary object to a non-const reference).

share|improve this answer

A combination of a char array and placement new would work.

char buf[<size big enough to hold largest derived type>];
A *a = NULL;

switch (some_var)
{
case 1:
    a = new(buf) A;
    break;
case 2:
    a = new(buf) B;
    break;
default:
    a = new(buf) C;
    break;
}

// do stuff with a

a->~A(); // must call destructor explicitly
share|improve this answer
10  
I'd use aligned_union<A, B, C>::type instead to guarantee not only correct size, but also correct alignment. – R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 15 '12 at 17:43
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes … and yet this question is missing a clear, clean, upvoted answer demonstrating how this works. You deleted yours (which was hacky but at least worked). Why don’t you write a new one using aligned_union? – Konrad Rudolph Aug 15 '12 at 21:32

To strictly answer your question - what you have now does just that - i.e. a = A(); and a = B() and a = C(), but these objects are sliced.

To achieve polymorphic behavior with the code you have, I', afraid that's not possible. The compiler needs to know the size beforehand of the object. Unless you have references or pointers.

If you use a pointer, you need to make sure it doesn't end up dangling:

A* a = NULL;

switch (some_var)
{
case 1:
    A obj;
    a = &obj;
    break;
}

won't work because obj goes out of scope. So you're left with:

A* a = NULL;
A obj1;
B obj2;
C obj3;
switch (some_var)
{
case 1:
    a = &obj1;
    break;
case 2:
    a = &obj2;
    break;
case 3:
    a = &obj3;
    break;
}

This of course is wasteful.

For references it's a bit trickier because they have to be assigned on creation, and you can't use temporaries (unless it's a const reference). So you'll probably need a factory that returns a persistent reference.

share|improve this answer

trying to avoid heap allocation with new)?

Well in that case you create object on stack as usual and assign address to the base pointer. But remember, if this is done inside a function, don't pass the address as return value, because stack will unwind after the function call returns.

So this is bad.

A* SomeMethod()
{
    B b;
    A* a = &b; // B inherits from A
    return a;
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's not what he's doing... – tenfour Aug 15 '12 at 17:42
    
Yes I know. This is "FYI warning"... :) – Ankush Aug 15 '12 at 17:45

It is possible, but it's a lot of effort to do cleanly (without manual placement new and exposed raw buffers, that is).

You're looking at something like Boost.Variant, modified to restrict the types to a base class and some derived classes, and to expose a polymorphic reference to the base type.

This thing (PolymorphicVariant ?) would wrap all the placement new stuff for you (and also take care of safe destruction).

If it's really what you want, let me know and I'll give you a start. Unless you really need exactly this behaviour though, Mike Seymour's suggestion is more practical.

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