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This is code that I came across implementing the quick sort algorithm. Can you please explain how the recursion works here?

 void quickSort(int arr[], int left, int right)
 {
  int i = left, j = right;
  int tmp;
  int pivot = arr[(left + right) / 2];

  /* partition */
  while (i <= j) {
        while (arr[i] < pivot)
              i++;
        while (arr[j] > pivot)
              j--;
        if (i <= j) {
              tmp = arr[i];
              arr[i] = arr[j];
              arr[j] = tmp;
              i++;
              j--;
    }
}
/* recursion */
if (left < j)
    quickSort(arr, left, j);
if (i < right)
        quickSort(arr, i, right);
}

And please note, this is not homework.

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closed as not a real question by Parag Bafna, Nifle, Max MacLeod, Protron, Joris Timmermans May 17 '13 at 15:28

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2  
Do you know how the quicksort works? –  Topo Aug 15 '12 at 18:46
11  
If it's not for homework, use std::sort. –  Dave Aug 15 '12 at 18:46
1  
@Topo Yes, you compare the values of the array with a pivot which is an element of the array and depending on whether they are greater or smaller than the pivot you send them to two arrays and then ou concatenate the arrays when they are sorted. –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Aug 15 '12 at 18:48
1  
more or less, yes.. but one of the strengths of quicksort is that you can do the whole thing in place. so there is no "send" and concatenation. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 15 '12 at 18:49
1  
Note that this implementation is broken, as it can result in a depth of recursion of O(n) (which will cause stack overflow for any large arrays). –  James Kanze Aug 15 '12 at 19:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Not sure what you mean with "explain how the recursion is working". But here you go:

The function you posted takes an array of ints and two indexes. It will not sort the whole array, but only the part of it between the two indexes, ignoring anything that is outside them. This means the same function can sort the whole array if you pass the first and last indexes, or just a sub array if you pass a left value that is not the index of the first element of the array and/or a right value that is not the index of the last element.

The sorting algorithm is the well known quicksort. The as pivot it uses the central element (it could as well have used any other element). It partitions the array into the less than (or equal to) pivot subarray and the greater than (or equal to) pivot subarray, leaving an element equal to the pivot between the two partitions.

Then it recursively calls itself to sort the two partitions, but only does it if it is necessary (hence the ifs before the recursive calls).

The implementation works, but is sub-optimal in many ways, and could be improved. Here are some possible improvements:

  1. switch to another sorting algorithm if the array is sufficiently short
  2. chose the pivot value as median of three values (generally first, last and mid)
  3. initially move one pivot value out of the array (put it in first or last position and reduce the focus to the rest of the array) then change the tests to pass over values that are equal to the pivot to reduce the number of swaps involving them. You'll put the pivot value back in with a final exchange at the end. This is especially useful if you do not follow suggestion 2 and chose the firs/last element instead of the mid one as in this implementation.
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late reply but I just added some prints and it might help whoever comes across this understand the code.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

void quickSort(int arr[], int left, int right)
 {
  int i = left, j = right;
  int tmp;
  int pivot = arr[abs((left + right) / 2)];
  cout<<"pivot is"<<pivot<<endl;

  /* partition */
  while (i <= j) {
        while (arr[i] < pivot)
              i++;
        while (arr[j] > pivot)
              j--;
        if (i <= j) {
              cout<<"i and j are"<<i<<" "<<j<<"and corresponding array value is"<<arr[i]<<" " <<arr[j]<<endl;
              tmp = arr[i];
              arr[i] = arr[j];
              arr[j] = tmp;
              i++;
              j--;
              cout<<"entering first big while loop"<<endl;
         for(int i=0;i<7;i++)
    cout<<arr[i]<<" "<<endl ;
    }
}
cout<<"recursion"<<endl;

/* recursion */
if (left < j)
    quickSort(arr, left, j);

if (i< right)
        quickSort(arr, i, right);
}
int main(){
    int arr[7]= {2,3,8,7,4,9,1};
        for(int i=0;i<7;i++)
    cout<<arr[i]<<" " ;
    quickSort(arr,0,6);
    cout<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<7;i++)
    cout<<arr[i]<<" " ;
int wait;
cin>>wait;
return 0;
}
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Here is your answer -- in the common case both the recursive calls will be executed because the conditions above them will be true. However, in the corner case you could have the pivot element be the largest (or the smallest) element. In which case you have to make only one recursive call which will basically attempt the process one more time by choosing a different pivot without reducing the size of the array.

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Actually if one of the tests fail because the pivot was the max or min value, the other recursion (if called) will process a smaller array (shorter by one element). –  Analog File Aug 15 '12 at 19:08
    
true that. 0123 –  necromancer Aug 15 '12 at 19:25
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