Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So, I created an object which makes an AJAX call to populate its properties during the initialization phase. However, I am running into a very weird behaviour: I can print and see the property values fine within the $.ajax() scope, but any public method that returns the value of properties have a return value of "undefined".

Here's what the JS code looks like:

function MyFunction() {
   this.myProperty;
   this.init();
}

Myfunction.prototype.getPropertyValue = function () {
    alert(this.myProperty); // returns 'undefined'
}

Myfunction.prototype.init = function () { 
   $.ajax({
      type: 'get',
      url: "getProperty.php",
      dataType: "json",
      success: function(response) {
         this.myProperty = response[0].Property;
         alert(this.myProperty) // returns 'Property Name'
      }
   });
}

My thinking is that within the $.ajax() scope, 'this' is actually referring to something else. So, my question is how do I make sure that 'this.myProperty' is set and doesn't lose its value once we get outside of the AJAX scope?

Any help is much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! :) – Chris Baker Aug 15 '12 at 19:10
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Part of the reason why you're getting "undefined" because of the way you establish the value:

var MyFunction = function () {
   this.myProperty;
   alert(this.myProperty); // undefined!
   this.init();
};

When you declare properties (or variables) without specifying a value, they default to "undefined". Instead:

var MyFunction = function () {
   this.myProperty = false;
   alert(this.myProperty); // false
   this.init();
};

On to the ajax call. You are right that the scope of the callback is not the same as the object. this, in the ajax success function, refers to the jQuery-wrapped XHR object. When you call this.myProperty = response[0].Property, you are actually creating a new property on the ajax object and setting its value. To correct this, you can either use the context option of the jQuery ajax object, OR bind the callback function using the javascript bind method:

  success: function(response) {
     this.myProperty = response[0].Property;
  }.bind(this)

... or:

   $.ajax({
      type: 'get',
      url: "getProperty.php",
      dataType: "json",
      context: this,
      success: function(response) {
         this.myProperty = response[0].Property;
      }
   });

Try it here: http://jsfiddle.net/SnLmu/

Documentation

share|improve this answer
    
How do I handle the race condition then? Because now, the value is 'false' (which makes sense). Is there a way to force the AJAX call to run synchronously? (async:false is depecrated since 1.8, from what I know) – steacha Aug 15 '12 at 19:23
    
@steacha Javascript is not multi-threaded and lacks a sleep function, so a "synchronous" call only means that you block until it is done. Blocking in javascript is blocking in the worst way -- the UI will be locked and the page unresponsive. You might even trigger the "this script is taking too long" warning if your blocking loop is too tight (like while(!$condition) { continue; }, for example). You should use a callback function instead -- an ajax call in an object constructor is probably not the most reliable way to build your class because of this limitation. – Chris Baker Aug 15 '12 at 19:30
    
@steacha See: hunlock.com/blogs/Snippets:_Synchronous_AJAX for ideas, but you see there he mentions that the UI will be blocked. Also see the docs for XMLHttpRequest - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/… -- you can specify that your request should be synchronous, just not using jQuery's ajax() – Chris Baker Aug 15 '12 at 19:32
    
A callback function like adeneo suggested below? – steacha Aug 15 '12 at 19:47
    
(FYI, "above" and "below" changes each time you load the page, when answers have the same vote count) adeneo's suggested route is one of several ways that you can approach the problem, depending on how you're going to use the class. If you want to call the getPropertyValue method as soon as possible, you could put it in the success callback, or pass it as a constructor argument, or set it on a timer.... there are many methods, depending on how you're going to use this class. With all respect to adeneo's solution, it does make assumptions based on guesswork; you've not given any context. – Chris Baker Aug 15 '12 at 21:36

Part of the problem is that the ajax is asynchronous so the properties may not be set when you try to access them (race condition). The other is the value of this inside of the ajax call is not Myfunction. You can fix by:

Myfunction.prototype.init = function () { 
   var that = this;
   $.ajax({
      type: 'get',
      url: "getProperty.php",
      dataType: "json",
      success: function(response) {
         that.myProperty = response[0].Property;
         alert(that.myProperty) // returns 'Property Name'
      }
   });
}

or you can use the context setting in the ajax call. Per the site:

This object will be made the context of all Ajax-related callbacks. By default, the context is an object that represents the ajax settings used in the call ($.ajaxSettings merged with the settings passed to $.ajax). For example, specifying a DOM element as the context will make that the context for the complete callback of a request, like so:

Myfunction.prototype.init = function () { 
       var that = this;
       $.ajax({
          type: 'get',
          url: "getProperty.php",
          dataType: "json",
          context: Myfunction,
          success: function(response) {
             this.myProperty = response[0].Property;
             alert(this.myProperty) // returns 'Property Name'
          }
       });
    }
share|improve this answer
var MyFunction = {
    myProperty: null,
    init: function() {
        var self = this;
        self.ajax(function(response) {
            self.myProperty = response;
            self.secondfunction(self.myProperty); //call next step only when ajax is complete
        });
    },
    ajax: function(callback) {
        $.ajax({
            type: 'get',
            url: "getProperty.php",
            dataType: "json"
        }).done(function(response) {
            callback(response[0].Property);
        });
    },
    secondfunction: function(prop) {
        alert(prop);
    }
}

$(function() {    
    MyFunction.init();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Just a note: this object is not equivalent to the object in the OP's code. Both are completely valid approaches, and depending on the use-case, either one may be appropriate. This is an object literal, the question code shows a prototype-based object. – Chris Baker Aug 16 '12 at 1:31
    
@chris - You are of course right, this is not a prototype based answer, and I did start typing something with prototype, but based on the way the the init() function was setup and the ajax call that most likely would require a callback, it seemed like an object literal would be more appropriate, and that's how I would have done it, so I decided to show how to do it this way instead ? – adeneo Aug 16 '12 at 9:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.