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I am trying to revise a java code to write something into a txt file. The original code is:

try {
    out = new PrintStream(system.out, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

I use FileOutputStream to do this, and revise the code to:

try {
    FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream("wiki.txt", true);
    out = new PrintStream(os, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

But it doesn't work, the error is:

Wikipedia2Txt.java:56: unreported exception java.io.FileNotFoundException; must be caught or declared to be thrown
    FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream("wiki.txt");
                          ^
1 error

I try two ways: 1, I make a wiki.txt file manually on disk; 2, no wiki.txt exist before run the code. But either doesn't work. It just stopped when compiled.

So what is going on? Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Java is not telling you that the file is not found, just that it may not be found at runtime, and your program is not ready to handle it.

Here is one way to address this:

try {
    FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
    out = new PrintStream(os, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (FileNotFoundException fnf) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    fnf.printStackTrace();
}

Here is another way:

try {
    FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
    out = new PrintStream(os, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    fnf.printStackTrace();
}

The first way ensures the compiler that your code is prepared to handle both exceptions separately; the second way ensures the compiler that your code is prepared to handle a superclass of both exceptions. The two ways are not the same, because the second one covers more exceptions that the first one.

Finally, there is an alternative to silence the compiler by declaring your function with a throws block (either a common superclass or the two individual classes would do). This is a way to tell the compiler that your function has no idea of how to handle these exceptions, and that they should be handled by a caller. The consequence of this approach is that every caller of your function must put a try/catch around the call, or declare the exceptions using throws.

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Thank you. When I add your code, it works. What is the effect of your code? It seems like that when error happens, the program just skip to catch part, and output the error info. But when I run your code, no error info is provided, and the code is correctly compiled, and runs well. What is happening? –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:07
1  
@Denzel Think of the catch blocks as an insurance against something that shouldn't happen in the normal course of the action, but may nevertheless happen if something goes wrong. It is very important to not use exception handling for the normal flow of your program, and Java libraries never do it. To see the catch block executed, rename the file that you read, or replace it with a garbage file. The first case should produce a "file not found"; the second should produce an "encoding error". –  dasblinkenlight Aug 15 '12 at 19:11
    
Thanks a lot. That is clear. –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:15
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The signature of the FileOutputStream constructor that you're using is public FileOutputStream(File file) throws FileNotFoundException. This means it is a checked exception which you have to handle. Therefore make sure that your method in which you have written this code either handles this exception (i.e. specify this exception as part of the catch block) or you specifically throw this exception.

So either of the following would work for you:

Specify in catch block

try {
    FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
    out = new PrintStream(os, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Or make your method throw this exception - so your method signature would be something like return_type method_name (params_list) throws FileNotFoundException

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Thanks for the help. –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:24
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You need to handle the situation when the file is not found.

Try this:

try {
    File file = (..your code..)
    FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
     out = new PrintStream(os, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
   // Handling a situation when file is not found.
   e.printStackTrace();
}

Your IDE (for instance Eclipse, IDEA, NetBeans) should provide additional help in such situations. As you have generated stubs, you are probably already using IDE. Isn't your code red-underlined?

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No I am running on Linux with command line. –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:10
1  
So you definitely should install Eclipse on your Linux. I personally can recommend IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition. It's a wonderful free stuff. It provides a lot of help for developer - real boost in productivity. The more you use Intellij IDEA, the less you need help in Stack Overflow. :-) And I can also recommend reading some Java tutorial - especially about checked and unchecked exceptions. Have a fun while writing in Java! –  Maciej Ziarko Aug 15 '12 at 19:16
    
Thanks for the suggestions. I am not familiar java. Just have to use java code to handle something in project. I will try that. –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:20
    
Great. Writing something useful in a programming language is the best way to learn it. Practice > theory. –  Maciej Ziarko Aug 15 '12 at 19:22
    
So when I use something with checked exceptions, I have to catch or throw. If not, the compiler will bother me. But for unchecked exceptions, it is OK. Right? –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:31
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You are just trampling upon one of the sore spots of Java: checked exceptions. There's a myriad of exceptions that may happen when your code is running, but only some of them must be declared in advance. My preferred way to handle your piece of code would be to wrap any and all checked exceptions into a RuntimeException that you can handle somewhere else up the stack trace:

try {
  FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
  out = new PrintStream(os, true, "UTF-8");
} catch (RuntimeException e) { 
  throw e; 
} 
catch (Exception e) { 
  throw new RuntimeException(e); 
}

In most cases handling exceptions right at the spot where they happen is wrong and leads to swallowed exceptions and generally unreliable, hard-to-debug code.

In a well-engineered application all exceptions that represent a failure—rather than an expected alternative situation—must be propagated up the stack frame towards the so-called exception barrier, where all failures are uniformly handled.

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Thanks for the help. –  user1572741 Aug 15 '12 at 19:13
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