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I'm trying to replicate the Mastermind game within c# and have hit a hurdle, so to speak. The problem I'm facing is at the stage where player 2 guesses which 3 checkboxes are correct from the 6 available. (8 rows for 8 attempts/lives at guessing). The code I have works when player 2 guesses the correct checkboxes, however when the incorrect checkboxes are selected and the "guess" button is clicked nothing happens. I have a second if statement to check this but obviously something must be wrong. The code for the button click event is:

 private void Guess_button_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
     int boxesChecked = 0;   // Default value

     CheckBox[] checkBoxArray = new CheckBox[] 
         { checkBox1, checkBox2, checkBox3, checkBox4, checkBox5, checkBox6 };

     for (int i = 0; i < checkBoxArray.Length; i++)
     {
         if (checkBoxArray[i].Checked)
             boxesChecked++;
      }

      if (boxesChecked > 3)
          MessageBox.Show("You have checked " + boxesChecked.ToString() + 
              " checkboxes. Only 3 are allowed.");
      else if (boxesChecked < 3)
          MessageBox.Show("You have checked " + boxesChecked.ToString() + 
              " checkboxes. Please choose 3.");

      if (checkBox1.Checked == cb1)
          if (checkBox2.Checked == cb2)
              if (checkBox3.Checked == cb3)
                  if (checkBox4.Checked == cb4)
                      if (checkBox5.Checked == cb5)
                          if (checkBox6.Checked == cb6)
                          {
                              MessageBox.Show("Congratulations, You Win!", 
                                  "Game Won"); 

                              if (MessageBox.Show("Would you like to play again?", 
                                  "Play Again?", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo) == DialogResult.Yes)
                              {
                                  p1input restart = new p1input();
                                  this.Close();   // Close current window
                                  restart.Show(); // Open restart (instance of p1input)
                              }
                              else
                              {
                                  Environment.Exit(0);    // Terminate Application
                              }

    if (checkBox1.Checked != cb1)
        if (checkBox2.Checked != cb2)
            if (checkBox3.Checked != cb3)
                if (checkBox4.Checked != cb4)
                    if (checkBox5.Checked != cb5)
                        if (checkBox6.Checked != cb6)
                        {
                            MessageBox.Show("Unlucky, Guess Again!");
                            checkBox1.Visible = false;
                            checkBox2.Visible = false;
                            checkBox3.Visible = false;
                            checkBox4.Visible = false;
                            checkBox5.Visible = false;
                            checkBox6.Visible = false;
                        }
    }                              
}
share|improve this question
5  
Love the nested if statements. – Oded Aug 15 '12 at 18:59
4  
At first glance, those nested ifs look dangerous. As in, they probably don't work the way you think they do. – Almo Aug 15 '12 at 19:00
1  
I would do a Switch on CheckBox State personally.. this looks very messy.. also what is cb1 and cb2 etc... – MethodMan Aug 15 '12 at 19:01
1  
We ask questions because we don't know..... – Menefee Aug 15 '12 at 19:17
    
Write a class that holds the answer, takes a guess, and returns the clues, turn your click method into abouyt five lines of code for starters. Pass in the guess as an array of booleans, get clues back as the same so you can set youyr UI. What if you wanted to use a shape instead of check box? what if you want more checkboxes? what if you wanted to provide a facility? Break this habit now, event handlers should have a minimum of code, and that code should be written so it can be called from outside of anythinhg to do with the UI. – Tony Hopkinson Aug 15 '12 at 19:22
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Ok, let's go. There a few things to review at your code:

1. How many checkbox are checked?

Let's use a little lamba to make that for a little bit prettier:

boxesChecked = checkBoxArray.Where<CheckBox>(x => x.Checked).Count();

2. If the user doesn't have checked 3 checkboxes, let's show the message and leave the method!

It's a little bit simplified too, you may wish to change it:

        if (boxesChecked != 3)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(string.Format("You have checked {0} checkboxes. Please choose 3.", boxesChecked));
            return;
        }

3. Verify the result

Let's change those if a little bit. Notice the main else condition (player lost!):

        if (checkBox1.Checked == cb1
            && checkBox2.Checked == cb2
            && checkBox3.Checked == cb3
            && checkBox4.Checked == cb4
            && checkBox5.Checked == cb5
            && checkBox6.Checked == cb6)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Congratulations, You Win!", "Game Won"); // Display MessageBox

            if (MessageBox.Show("Would you like to play again?", "Play Again?", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo) == DialogResult.Yes)
            {
                p1input restart = new p1input();
                this.Close();   // Close current window
                restart.Show(); // Open restart (instance of p1input)
            }
            else
            {
                Environment.Exit(0);    // Terminate Application
            }
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Unlucky, Guess Again!");
            checkBox1.Visible = false;
            checkBox2.Visible = false;
            checkBox3.Visible = false;
            checkBox4.Visible = false;
            checkBox5.Visible = false;
            checkBox6.Visible = false;
        }

Please note that I'm not saying that this is the best design for a game, I'm just pointing out a few things to change on your code.


UPDATE

Based on spender's comment, let's review your method. Please, check it out:

    private void Guess_button_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int boxesChecked = 0;   // Default value

        List<CheckBox> AllTheCheckBoxes = new List<CheckBox> { checkBox1, checkBox2, checkBox3, checkBox4, checkBox5, checkBox6 };

        boxesChecked = AllTheCheckBoxes.Where<CheckBox>(x => x.Checked).Count();

        if (boxesChecked != 3)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(string.Format("You have checked {0} checkboxes. Please choose 3.", boxesChecked));
            return;
        }

        if (AllTheCheckBoxes.Any<CheckBox>(x => x.Checked != Convert.ToBoolean(x.Tag)))
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Unlucky, Guess Again!");

            AllTheCheckBoxes.ForEach(x => x.Visible = false);

            return;
        }

        MessageBox.Show("Congratulations, You Win!", "Game Won"); // Display MessageBox

        if (MessageBox.Show("Would you like to play again?", "Play Again?", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo) == DialogResult.Yes)
        {
            p1input restart = new p1input();
            this.Close();   // Close current window
            restart.Show(); // Open restart (instance of p1input)
        }
        else
        {
            Environment.Exit(0);    // Terminate Application
        }
    }

Notice that I'm using the Tag property. It's an arbitrary string, that developer may use for any purpose. Here I'm expecting that the correct value (true or false) is stored at this property.


UPDATE 2

Regarding OP comment about finding all the checkboxes (looks like its 48 total). You can use the following statement (understand it and improve it to your needs).

List<CheckBox> AllTheCheckBoxes = this.Controls.AsQueryable().OfType<CheckBox>().Where(x => x.Tag != null).ToList();
share|improve this answer
6  
Kudos for not bashing the noob and being constructive. up vote – Menefee Aug 15 '12 at 19:14
2  
@Menefee Thanks. Unfortunately not everybody is an expert from born. People are always learning, and we must support them (and get supported as well!) – Andre Calil Aug 15 '12 at 19:16
1  
+1 for your above comment. :) – Shyju Aug 15 '12 at 19:56
    
Many thanks for taking the time to write a detailed response @AndreCalil. I'd never come across the Tag property so that's good to know. One thing, if you could confirm, is on the code: List<CheckBox> AllTheCheckBoxes = new List<CheckBox> { checkBox1, checkBox2, checkBox3, checkBox4, checkBox5, checkBox6 }; In total there are 48 checkboxes, 8 rows with 6 checkboxes in each, to give 8 attempts to player2, wrong attempt results in box not visible. I was wondering in regards to the above <list> code, would I need to list all 48 checkboxes or is there a better/cleaner way to approach that? – user1597804 Aug 15 '12 at 21:11
    
@user1597804 : yes, consider encapsulating a row into its own class (lets call it Row), would have a property List<CheckBox>. Then a game has a List<Row> containing 8 rows. – spender Aug 15 '12 at 21:39

Your check for an incorrect value appears to be inside the braces of the if statements for when the user guesses correctly.

In other words, it won't ever be hit. You need to break it out of the braces so it runs.

Like others said, all those nested ifs are going to hurt you in the end. Consider cleaning up that bit so you can understand what's happening better.

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