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Basicly, lets say I got File f1 = new File("C:\\somedir\\batch1.bat"); and File f2 = new File("C:\\somedir\\batch2.bat"); and I have 2 ifs

if(f1.exists() == false)
{
    showMessage("File 1 not detected, creating new...");
    f1.createNewFile();
}
else
{
    showMessage("File 1 detected, deleting it and creating new...");
    f1.delete();
    f1.createNewFile();
}

and

if(f2.exists() == false)
{
    showMessage("File 2 not detected, creating new...");
    f2.createNewFile();
}
else
{
    showMessage("File 2 detected, deleting it and creating new...");
    f2.delete();
    f2.createNewFile();
}

First if executes "else" code no matter if file exists or not, and second one executes "if" part, without creating new file. help please!

EDIT

My showMessage(String msg) method does System.out.println(msg) just so you know.

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7  
You need to check whether createNewFile return true. It won't work unless the directory exists and you have write access. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 15 '12 at 19:09
    
BTW: delete can fail too if a) it doesn't exist b) you don't have access c) the file is locked. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 15 '12 at 19:15
    
@StealthyHunter7 you can try File.mkdirs to attempt to create the parent directories. Note I would avoid using File in favor of the NIO.2 API. –  oldrinb Aug 15 '12 at 19:16
    
Where do I need to check if it returns true? Instead of exists() ? or after I call it? Thanks –  Comrade Bearabyte Aug 15 '12 at 19:17
1  
@StealthyHunter7, welcome to Stack Overflow! Please be aware that tags are not keywords. That is, stuffing the tag list full of the same words that are in your question title and body isn't helpful. Combining, file and exists, for example, doesn't mean you're trying to see if a file exists. –  Charles Aug 16 '12 at 1:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Hmm I'm sure not the problem but doing this is more readable:

File f = new File(filePathString);
if(!f.exists()) { /* do something */ }

rather then:

if(f1.exists() == false)
    {
      ...
    }

also when deleting a file always check its return value:

if(f.delete()) {//deleted successfully
}else {//couldnt delete
   //show error message
}

and as PeterLawrey said you should do the same for createNewFile():

if(f.createNewFile()) {//created successfully
}else {//couldnt create
   //show error message
}

and lastly always check for permissions before trying to do anything:

if(f.canRead()&&f.canWrite()) {//can read and write free to do what is needed
   //do stuff
}else {
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It would be a comment, if only you could put readable code in a comment . :) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 15 '12 at 19:16
    
@PeterLawrey yes thats the only reason I didnt. But I am adding more to my answer to make it maybe more valuable –  David Kroukamp Aug 15 '12 at 19:17
1  
Thanks for your answer, it did provide me with information what went wrong. :D –  Comrade Bearabyte Aug 15 '12 at 19:32
1  
Under Windows 7, canRead & canWrite can return false positives due to the UAC (under Java 6, haven't tested Java 7) –  MadProgrammer Aug 15 '12 at 19:52
2  
@DavidKroukamp yeah, but real programmers have to deal with real users, nuff said ;) –  MadProgrammer Aug 15 '12 at 19:57

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