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A simple question, hopefully. Why am I getting 0's for lostWagesLabel and totalNeedLabel - two values calculated in the following code?

EDIT: Original question replaced entirely with the following code - updated based on suggestions received so far:

Three values are passed through a segue from a parent scene to this scene. And all three values appear correctly when shown as text values in this scene. But only one of the values (Weeks) appears correctly when I run NSLog - which means the other two values are going into the calculations as 0's.

Here are the declarations in the parent scene:

IBOutlet UISlider *earningsSlider;
IBOutlet UILabel *earningsLabel;
IBOutlet UISlider *disabledSlider;
IBOutlet UILabel *disabledLabel;
IBOutlet UISlider *expensesSlider;
IBOutlet UILabel *expensesLabel;

And here is a sample of the implementation:

- (IBAction)earningsSlide:(id)sender {
    NSNumberFormatter *commas = [NSNumberFormatter new];
    commas.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterDecimalStyle;
    int earningsValue = (int)(earningsSlider.value / 1000.0);
    [earningsSlider setValue:earningsValue * 1000.0];
    earningsLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"$%@", 
                         [commas stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:earningsValue * 1000]]];
}

Here is where everything is passed through the segue:

- (void)prepareForSegue:(UIStoryboardSegue *)segue sender:(id)sender {
    if ([segue.identifier isEqualToString:@"DisabilitySegue"]) {
        DisabilityViewController *destViewController = segue.destinationViewController;
        destViewController.earningsNumber = self->earningsLabel.text;
        destViewController.expensesNumber = self->expensesLabel.text;
        destViewController.disabledNumber = self->disabledLabel.text;
    }
}

Here are the declarations in the new scene:

@property (nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UILabel *earningsLabel;
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *earningsNumber;
@property (nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UILabel *expensesLabel;
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *expensesNumber;
@property (nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UILabel *disabledLabel;
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *disabledNumber;
@property (nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UILabel *message;
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *lostWages;
@property (nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UILabel *lostWagesLabel;
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *totalNeed;
@property (nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UILabel *totalNeedLabel;

And here is the implementation in it's current state:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    NSNumberFormatter *commas = [NSNumberFormatter new];
    commas.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterDecimalStyle;
    earningsLabel.text = earningsNumber;
    expensesLabel.text = expensesNumber;
    disabledLabel.text = disabledNumber;
    int earn = [earningsNumber intValue];
    int expense = [expensesNumber intValue];
    int weeks = [disabledNumber intValue];
    NSLog(@"%d %d %d",earn,expense,weeks);
    //print values to console
    int lost = (int)(earn / 52 * weeks);
    int need = (int)(expense * 12 / 52 * weeks);
    NSLog(@"%d %d",lost,need);
    //print values to console
    lostWages = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"$%@",
                        [commas stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithInteger:lost]]];
    totalNeed = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"$%@",
                        [commas stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithInteger:need]]];
    lostWagesLabel.text = lostWages;
    totalNeedLabel.text = totalNeed;

    [super viewDidLoad];
}

The NSLog looks like this when I run it using the smallest amounts possible of 1000, 100 & 1 for earnings, expenses and disabled(*weeks*) in the parent scene:

2012-08-17 09:01:38.277 MyApp[8117:15203] 0 0 1

2012-08-17 09:01:38.279 MyApp[8117:15203] 0 0

I'm also trying to change the format of what's being sent through the segue with this as the declarations in the parent scene:

@interface IncomeProtectionViewController : UIViewController {

    IBOutlet UISlider *earningsSlider;
    IBOutlet UISlider *expensesSlider;
    IBOutlet UISlider *disabledSlider;
    IBOutlet UILabel *earningsLabel;
    IBOutlet UILabel *expensesLabel;
    IBOutlet UILabel *disabledLabel;
    NSNumber *earningsNumber;
    NSNumber *expensesNumber;
    NSNumber *disabledNumber;
}

And this in the implementation:

- (void)prepareForSegue:(UIStoryboardSegue *)segue sender:(id)sender {
    if ([segue.identifier isEqualToString:@"DisabilitySegue"]) {
        DisabilityViewController *destViewController = segue.destinationViewController;
        destViewController.earningsNumber = self->earningsNumber;
        destViewController.expensesNumber = self->expensesNumber;
        destViewController.disabledNumber = self->disabledNumber;
    }
}

But I'm getting incompatibility warnings over in the destination scene.

share|improve this question
    
Have you debugged it? Are these numbers being pulled over properly? Are you getting a proper float value out of them? –  Dan F Aug 15 '12 at 19:24
    
Can you provide some sample values that might be found in earningsNumber, expensesNumber, and disabledNumber? –  Jeremy1026 Aug 15 '12 at 19:25
    
NSLog the values of those variables and see what they are. As a side note, if the values that you're casting to int are less than 0 they'll get truncated to 0. –  Dustin Aug 15 '12 at 19:25
    
The app compiles with no errors. The calculated and other numbers all appear properly formatted - except the calculated numbers show up as $0. Values that can be selected for earningsNumber range from 0 to 150,000 in increments of 1,000; for expensesNumber from 0 to 12,000 by 1,000's; and for disabledNumber from 0 to 52 in whole numbers. I'm still fairly new to Xcode. I haven't done an NSLog yet. I'll see if I can figure out how. Thanks, everyone. –  steveald Aug 15 '12 at 19:32
    
To save time - if the first 3 values are 100,000, 5,000 and 10; then the 2 calculated values should be 19,230 and 11,538. –  steveald Aug 15 '12 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

There are a number of problems here.

First, never, ever, ever, use float or similar types for currency or other exact values. You will get wrong answers in calculations. This is what NSDecimal and NSDecimalNumber were created to address.

This leads to another question: what are you trying to do with your math?:

int need = (int)(expense * 12 / 52 * weeks);

OK, so you've done some floating point math, then cast the result to an int. (Normally you'd probably want to use NSInteger, but we'll set that aside.) This means that any values less than 1 will get rounded down to zero, which could be your problem right there, depending on your inputs. (My guess is this is where your problem lies; use the debugger to examine your values!)

totalNeed = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"$%@",
                    [commas stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:need]]];

So, in light of the above, why are you using +numberWithFloat: when you have an int? I don't think this will break on its own, but it's still not really correct.

As an aside, I'm guessing that your integer literals (12 and 52) are coming from the calendar (12 months per year, 52 weeks per year). If not, you can ignore this, but if they are then this is also wrong: not all years have 52 weeks, not all years have 12 months (for some definition of month). You should not hardcode such values, but use the various date and time functions to do math as required.

Finally, if you are not using ARC, you are leaking commas.

Follow-Up

Looking at your updated code, I have a few more questions:

int earningsValue = (int)(earningsSlider.value / 1000.0);
[earningsSlider setValue:earningsValue * 1000.0];

What's this supposed to do? Aren't you just setting back the same value (albeit with some imprecision potentially introduced)?

destViewController.earningsNumber = self->earningsLabel.text;

This is not the correct way to access a property or instance variable of an object. -> dereferences a member of a struct pointer. You presumably want to use self.earningsLabel or [self earningsLabel].

Finally, it is generally ill-advised to intermingle your view with your model. For example, here you seem to be using label text as a representation of your backing data, which then forces a lot of type conversion, among other things. It would be better for you to have a model object, probably using NSDecimalNumber for backing storage, and update your views all from the model.

share|improve this answer
    
Using Xcode 4.3.2, Objective-C Automatic Reference Counting is set to the default of Yes. I was afraid this wasn't the most correct or concise code. I've been developing the app by finding similar examples and tutorials and modifying them to fit my needs. And the calculations I've done so far are coming out correct (though very basic - like 500 * 12 / 52). Nothing ever ends up below 1. The first calculation you listed takes a monthly expense amount and expresses it in weekly terms which is then multiplied by the weeks value. For these calculations, the hardcoded numbers work fine. –  steveald Aug 15 '12 at 20:05
    
Regarding the incorrect methods I'm using, I wouldn't ask you to rewrite it correctly. But, perhaps, you could point me toward some useful references. The books and online materials I've found are limited in how much they can help in this respect. –  steveald Aug 15 '12 at 20:08
    
WHERE IS THE 2ND ANSWER? We were onto something there and the whole thing just disappeared. NSLog had shown that values weren't transferring into the calculations properly and I asked for help formatting what was transferred in the segue into something that would work in the formulas. –  steveald Aug 16 '12 at 13:41
    
@steveald I guess the answerer deleted it? Anyhow, as for your question above, I'm not sure which incorrect methods your are referring to. The gold standard for most things are the class docs. For example, at developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Reference/…, you can see there is a +numberWithInt: method you might use. –  Conrad Shultz Aug 16 '12 at 20:38
    
@steveald And I agree that the code might work now, but not all years have 52 weeks - see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_week_date for examples. –  Conrad Shultz Aug 16 '12 at 20:40

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