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Stuck with a question again?? Have a look at the below code and help me to know is that a method overriding???

class Base{

      private void func(){

            System.out.println("In Base Class func method !!");         
      };
}

class Derived extends Base{

      public void func(){   //  Is this a Method Overriding..????

            System.out.println("In Derived Class func method"); 
      }


}

class InheritDemo{

      public static void main(String [] args){

            Derived D= new Derived();
            D.func(); 
      }
}

The above code works fine but is that overriding??

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5 Answers 5

No, a private method cannot be overridden since it is not visible from any other class. You have declared a new method for your subclass that has no relation to the superclass method. One way to look at it is to ask yourself whether it would be legal to write super.func() in the Derived class. There is no way an overriding method would be banned from accessing the method it is overriding, but this would precisely be the case here.

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yeah.. and if it is overrided then if i create a reference of the superclass and assign the base class object to it. t must also work but it is not –  AnkitChhajed Aug 15 '12 at 20:14

No, you are not overriding it. You can check by trying to mark it with @Override, or by trying to make a call to super.func();. Both won't work; they throw compiler errors.

Furthermore, check this out:

class Base {
      private void func(){
            System.out.println("In base func method");         
      };
      public void func2() {
          System.out.println("func2");
          func();
      }
}

class Derived extends Base {
      public void func(){   //  Is this an overriding method?
            System.out.println("In Derived Class func method"); 
      }
}

class InheritDemo {
      public static void main(String [] args) {
            Derived D = new Derived();
            D.func2(); 
      }
}

It will print:

func2
In base func method

When you change func() in Base to public, then it will be an override, and the output will change to:

func2
In Derived Class func method
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@Polygnome: +1 for the example demonstrating it's not an override, and for the @Override test. –  Mechanical snail Aug 15 '12 at 23:06
    
+1 for showing how dynamic dispatch works (or doesn't work :D) in this case. –  Vincenzo Pii Jul 10 '13 at 10:10

No, it is not. You can mark an override just to make sure like this:

@Override
public void func(){
     System.out.println("In Derived Class func method"); 
}

And in this case it would be a compiler error.

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Good old @Override, super useful! –  TheZ Aug 15 '12 at 20:09
    
yes it is indeed. :) –  Doorknob 冰 Aug 15 '12 at 20:10
    
thanks for replying.. but the code works fine even if i made the method in the superclass final... So what i think is if we use the same signature of the method in subclass with different modifier it is just creating a new method of subclass rather than overriding the above one.. –  AnkitChhajed Aug 15 '12 at 20:12
    
see edit. I misread private. XD –  Doorknob 冰 Aug 15 '12 at 20:12
    
@PicklishDoorknob oh!! its ok not a problem... :) –  AnkitChhajed Aug 15 '12 at 20:17

You are not overriding. You cannot override private members, you are merely defining a new method in Derived. Derived has no knowledge Base's implementation of func() since its declared as private. You won't get a compiler error when you define func() in Derived but that is because Derived does not know Base has an implementation of func(). To be clear: it would be incorrect to say you are overriding Base's implementation of func().

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oh oops I misread private XD –  Doorknob 冰 Aug 15 '12 at 20:11

Nope because if you do something like Base b = new Derived(); you still won't be able to call b.func(). What you're doing is called "hiding".

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hmm.. thanks a lot –  AnkitChhajed Aug 15 '12 at 20:16

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