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I am having little trouble using the python setUpClass.

For example consider the following case

class MyTest(unittest.case.TestCase):

    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        print "Test setup"
        try:
            1/0
        except:
            raise

    @classmethod
    def tearDownClass(cls):
        print "Test teardown"

A couple of questions

  1. Is the above code the right way to handle test setUpClass exceptions (by raising it so that the python unittest can take care of it), there are fail(), skip() methods, but those can only be used by test instances and not the test classes.

  2. When there is a setUpClass exception, how can we ensure that tearDownClass runs (unittest doesn't run it, should we manualy call it).

share|improve this question
    
except: raise does nothing. (Except maybe mess up the stack trace, not sure.) You might as well leave the whole try..except block out. – millimoose Aug 15 '12 at 20:47
5  
for your second question: if you think you might raise an exception, then you should use a try..except (like the one you have) to call tearDownClass on an exception. After that, you could reraise the exception. – Jeff Tratner Aug 15 '12 at 20:49
    
Thanks for the responses, as mentioned by Jeff, the second approach of calling tearDownClass and raising the exception is the solution. – sysuser Aug 15 '12 at 21:01
3  
@millimoose, It doesn't mess up the stack trace. That's the point of bare raise. – Mike Graham Aug 15 '12 at 21:11
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can call tearDownClass on an exception as Jeff points it out, but you may also implements the __del__(cls) method :

import unittest

class MyTest(unittest.case.TestCase):

    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        print "Test setup"
        try:
            1/0
        except:
            raise

    @classmethod
    def __del__(cls):
        print "Test teardown"

    def test_hello(cls):
        print "Hello"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Will have the following output :

Test setup
E
======================================================================
ERROR: setUpClass (__main__.MyTest)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "my_test.py", line 8, in setUpClass
    1/0
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 0 tests in 0.000s

FAILED (errors=1)
Test teardown

Note : you should be aware that the __del__ method will be called at the end of the program execution, which is maybe not what you want if you have a more than one test class.

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this code really clarifies things. – sysuser Sep 7 '12 at 19:17

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