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I think I'm missing something really obvious here, but I just can't put my finger on it ;-)

Is there an easier way to ensure that a data frame's rows are ordered according to a "target" vector as the one I implemented in the short example below?

df <- data.frame(name=letters[1:4], value=c(rep(TRUE, 2), rep(FALSE, 2)))

> df
  name value
1    a  TRUE
2    b  TRUE
3    c FALSE
4    d FALSE

target <- c("b", "c", "a", "d")

# This somehow seems to be a bit too "complicated" to get the job done:
idx <- sapply(target, function(x) {
    which(df$name == x)
})
df <- df[idx,]
rownames(df) <- NULL

> df 
  name value
1    b  TRUE
2    c FALSE
3    a  TRUE
4    d FALSE
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2 Answers 2

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Try match:

df <- data.frame(name=letters[1:4], value=c(rep(TRUE, 2), rep(FALSE, 2)))
target <- c("b", "c", "a", "d")
df[match(target, df$name),]

  name value
2    b  TRUE
3    c FALSE
1    a  TRUE
4    d FALSE

It will work as long as your target contains exactly the same elements as df$name, and neither contain duplicate values.

From ?match:

match returns a vector of the positions of (first) matches of its first argument 
in its second.

Therefore match finds the row numbers that matches target's elements, and then we return df in that order.

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Great, that's more like it and exactly what I was looking for! Thanks a lot –  Rappster Aug 15 '12 at 21:09
    
one question, what if the column that I would like to match has repeat values? like b,c,a,d,b,c,a,d. I tried match but it does not work well. –  Yulong Aug 21 '13 at 15:35
    
@Yulong: I'd think you'd have to explicitly make sure that duplicates are removed prior to firing match(). What comes to mind is duplicated(), unique() or some other custom routine that "keeps" the desired elements while throwing away the others. HTH –  Rappster Nov 17 '13 at 13:20
    
@Edward it's a nice solution. However, it also changes the indices. How can I also keep them in the ascending order(1, 2, 3, 4) ? –  Hasan Iqbal Anik Jun 8 at 1:17

This method is a bit different, it provided me with a bit more flexibility than the previous answer. By making it into an ordered factor, you can use it nicely in arrange and such. I used reorder.factor from the gdata package.

df <- data.frame(name=letters[1:4], value=c(rep(TRUE, 2), rep(FALSE, 2)))
target <- c("b", "c", "a", "d")

require(gdata)
df$name <- reorder.factor(df$name, new.order=target)

Next, use the fact that it is now ordered:

require(dplyr)
df %>%
  arrange(name)
    name value
1    b  TRUE
2    c FALSE
3    a  TRUE
4    d FALSE

If you want to go back to the original (alphabetic) ordering, just use as.character() to get it back to the original state.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Thanks for the update! –  Rappster May 26 at 11:38

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