Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm going through a C++ quiz. And came across the following code - it's illegal, but I can't understand why. Can anyone explain why this line:

Box* b1 = s1->duplicate();

generates the compiler error, "cannot convert from Shape* to Box"? I assumed that s1->duplicate() is calling Box::duplicate() because s1 actually points to a Box - but from the compiler error it looks like it's calling Shape::duplicate().

#include <iostream>

struct Shape
{
  virtual Shape* duplicate()
  {
    return new Shape;
  }

  virtual ~Shape() {}
};

struct Box : public Shape
{
  virtual Box* duplicate()
  {
    return new Box;
  }

};

int main(int argc, char** argv) 
{ 
  Shape* s1 = new Box;

  Box* b1 = s1->duplicate();

  delete s1;
  delete b1;
  return 0; 
}
share|improve this question
1  
Because of this. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 15 '12 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Shape::duplicates() returns a Shape*, which isn't a Box*. The runtime type you actually return has nothing to do with it. How could the compiler know that the Shape* returned actually points to a Box?

Edit: Think about this:

struct Shape
{
  virtual Shape* duplicate()
  {
    return new Shape;
  }

  virtual ~Shape() {}
};

struct Box : public Shape
{
  virtual Box* duplicate()
  {
    return new Box;
  }

};

struct Sphere : public Shape
{
  virtual Sphere* duplicate()
  {
    return new Sphere;
  }

};

Shape* giveMeABoxOrASpehere()
{
    if ( rand() % 2 )
       return new Box;
    else
       return new Sphere;
}

//
Shape* shape = giveMeABoxOrASphere();
// What does shape->duplicate() return?

Box* shape = giveMeABoxOrASphere();
// shoud this compile?
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. Well - I suppose I was thinking along the lines, that if the compiler can accept Shape* s = new Box` then it would somehow know that s1 is now a pointer to a Box. It's late, I think my brain is fried. . . –  BeeBand Aug 15 '12 at 21:21
2  
@BeeBand: There's an important difference between Shape* s = new Box; and Box* b = new Shape;. –  aschepler Aug 15 '12 at 21:36
1  
@BeeBand in this case you could find out with a dynamic_cast, so the type info is not completely lost. It's just unavailable to the compiler. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 15 '12 at 21:38
1  
@BeeBand Box is a Shape but Shape isn't a Box right? –  FailedDev Aug 15 '12 at 21:38
1  
@BeeBand "suppose I was thinking along the lines (...)" yes, the compiler could have an inference engine. Just like humans can make inferences. Please, describe mathematically the inference engine you expect the compiler to have (the implementation will certainly be trivial given a good mathematical description). ;) –  curiousguy Aug 16 '12 at 0:15

For the exact same reason

Shape* s1 = new Box;
Box* b1 = s1;

does not compile. The compiler does not care that s1 refers to a Box, nor should it care.

If you know that s1 refers to a Box, just say it:

Box *s1 = new Box;

A note about syntax: the parsing rules for Box * s1; are (very simplified):

declaration := type-name declarator ;
declarator := name 
            | * declarator

so the parsing is:

   Box        *       s1        ;
                   ^^^^^^^^
                  declarator
^^^^^^^^^    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
type-name         declarator

and the grouping is Box (* (s1) )

It is considered best style to write Box *s1; because it is more consistent with the parsing than Box* s1; If you declare more than one variable in one declaration, the Box* syntax can be confusing:

Box* x, y;

x is a pointer to Box, but y is a Box, as the parsing is:

Box (*x), y;
share|improve this answer
    
ok thanks for the tip re. parsing . . . –  BeeBand Aug 16 '12 at 8:43

C++ language is statically typed. The decisions about the legality of your call are made at compile time. The compiler, obviously, cannot know that s1->duplicate() returns a pointer to a Box object. Under these circumstances, it would be illogical to expect it to accept your code.

Yes, s1->duplicate() indeed calls Box::duplicate in your example, but how do you expect the compiler to know this? One can say that it is "obvious" from your specific example, but the specification of this language feature makes no exception for such "obvious" cases.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.