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I have a class called node. I want to store each nodes parent within each node like this:

public class Node
{
    public Node parent;
}

So say I assign parent to a node:

Node n = new Node();
Node n2 = new Node();
n.parent = n2;

If I change n2, will the parent variable of n change too?

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Did you mean n.parent = n2? –  birryree Aug 15 '12 at 21:19
    
Node.parent = n2; won't compile. –  Vlad Aug 15 '12 at 21:19
    
Does the sun set in the west? –  NominSim Aug 15 '12 at 21:20
    
he meant n.parent = n2 –  The Internet Aug 15 '12 at 21:20
    
Sorry, I edited it –  Sam Aug 15 '12 at 21:20
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, the parent variable of n will not change: once a reference is copied, it gets a life of its own. If you change the Node pointed by n2, however, n's parent will see that change. For example, if you set n2.parent = n3, n.parent.parent will change to n3 as well.

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Yes, that's by reference, n.parent = n2;

To be clear, if you change N2 (ie. N2.prop = newvalue), when you do n.Parent.prop, it'll be the newvalue.

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public class Node
{
   public string a;
   public Node parent;
}

Node n = new Node();

Node n2 = new Node();
n2.a = "1";
n.parent = n2; 

// n.parent.a is "1" now

n2.a = "2";

// n.parent.a is "2" now
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Think of variables, parameters, array slots, etc. of class types as holding "object IDs". A statement like n1.parent = n2; says "Find the object identified by the object ID stored in n1, which will be of type Node; change the parent field of that object to contain the object ID stored in n2".

Suppose n1 was initially assigned [Object ID#1] and n2 was initially assigned [Object ID#2]. The statement n1.parent = n2 will make the parent field of the Object #1 contain [Object ID #2]. If one were to perform a statement like n2.someProperty = 5 before one stores anything else in n2, that statement would modify that property of Object #2. Since the parent field of Object #1 holds [Object ID#2], the statement would also appear to modify n1.parent.someProperty. On the other hand, if one were to store a different object ID into n2, that would have no effect on n1.parent, which would continue to hold [Object ID #2].

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Yes, since it is by reference. It will be updated in both n and n2

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OK, thank you. I wasn't sure if it created a new object or stored a reference. –  Sam Aug 15 '12 at 21:21
    
@Sam no problem! Hope it helps. –  The Internet Aug 15 '12 at 21:22
    
n2 is a variable. Changing that variable won't also change all of the variables referencing the same thing. Changing what n2 references however, would be visible to everything else that references what n2 references. –  Servy Aug 15 '12 at 21:25
    
"Changing what n2 reference however, would be visible to everything else that references what n2 references." That's what I am saying "yes" to. I don't think the question is referring to the first part of your comment. –  The Internet Aug 15 '12 at 21:27
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Yes, you refer to the same object by reference.

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