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I have some code where I want to have a generic function that takes pointers from main code and manipulates the variable at the pointer address. The problem is that the pointers are of type char, int and short. I want to be able to do it without flags or keeping track of what type of pointer is being passed etc. My guess was that a typedef union of pointers could be used and then the function would take an int pointer (being the largest data size of the three)

The below sort of works except with the char pointer. Is there a better way to do this?

       #include <stdio.h>

    void pointerfunction(int *p);
    int a=10;
    short b=20;
    char f=4;
    typedef union 
    {
    int *ptr1;
    short *ptr2;
    char *ptr3;
    }pointers;

    int main()
    {
    pointers mypointers;

    mypointers.ptr1=&a;
    pointerfunction(mypointers.ptr1);
    printf("%d\n", *(mypointers.ptr1));
    mypointers.ptr2=&b;
    pointerfunction(mypointers.ptr1);
    printf("%d\n", *(mypointers.ptr2));
    mypointers.ptr3=&f;
    pointerfunction(mypointers.ptr1);
    printf("%d\n", *(mypointers.ptr3));
    }


    void pointerfunction(int *p)
    {
    *p=*p*10;  
    }
share|improve this question
1  
char *, short *, and int * are all the same size. The problem is that you're dereferencing char * as int *, meaning you're attempting to access an int where you only necessarily have a char, meaning you're accessing more data than you should be and thus it is undefined behavior. – oldrinb Aug 15 '12 at 21:26
    
What exactly does your union give you that a void * would not? – jxh Aug 15 '12 at 21:59

Your idea of using a union is a good one however you are going to have to have an additional member to the union to indicate what kind of a pointer it actually is.

All pointers on the same machine are the same size regardless as to whether they are an int *, char *, or void *.

The reason the int and short work is because the compiler converts the int and short to be int so the printf() function basically sees both the same.

First of all I am going to describe a possible implementation. However this particular implementation is ugly and is not really the way to do this since it has a number of problems not the least that you are using a command switch and really reducing cohesion and increasing coupling.

A first attempt would be something like the following.

#define  POINTER_UNION_TYPE_CHAR   1
#define  POINTER_UNION_TYPE_INT    2
#define  POINTER_UNION_TYPE_SHORT  3

typedef struct {
  int   iType;
  union {
    char *pChar;
    int  *pInt;
    short *pShort;
  } u;
} Pointers;

When you use this struct you would do something like:

int iValue = 1;
Pointers  PointerThing;

PointerThing.u.pInt = &iValue;  PointerThing.iType = POINTER_UNION_TYPE_INT;

Then in your function using this you would do something like:

void pointer_funct (Pointers *pPointers)
{
   switch (pPointers->iType) {
      case  POINTER_UNION_TYPE_CHAR:
           // do things with char pointer pPointers->u.pChar
           break;
      case  POINTER_UNION_TYPE_INT:
           // do things with char pointer pPointers->u.pInt
           break;
      case  POINTER_UNION_TYPE_SHORT:
           // do things with char pointer pPointers->u.pShort
           break;
      default:
           break;
    }
}

A better way to do this is to have separate functions that do what is all combined into a single function. So in other words, you would have three different functions that each will handle a particular pointer type. That way the functionality that knows what the type is can just go ahead and call the appropriate function.

Another approach to this is to use some object oriented techniques with this. See this post to another though similar question.

share|improve this answer
1  
"All pointers on the same machine are the same size regardless as to whether they are an int *, char *, or void *." -- this is not guaranteed by the language definition, and it is not true on some (admittedly oddball or out-of-date) architectures. – John Bode Aug 15 '12 at 22:01
    
Ok thanks to all for the advice. I see the error of my assumptions about unions. I thought that I read somewhere that all the members of a union take the size of the largest member type so the issues with alignment would also be taken care of automatically. Apparently not. Thanks – Bruce Duncan Aug 16 '12 at 2:04
1  
@BruceDuncan: The union itself takes the size of the largest member and the alignment of the union is such that all it's members are aligned. So your pointers would all be aligned, but the data they point to are just as they usually would be. – tinman Aug 16 '12 at 7:58

As others have said, this is impossible in C. You are correct that int is the largest of the three types, but you seem to be missing the implications of this fact.

Why is this impossible in C?

In C, data is stored directly in memory with no meta-data overhead. A variable directly maps to data in memory. Unless you create it (violating your requirement that there be no flags or keeping track of what type of pointer is being passed), there is no information stored with the variable on things like:

  • what type it is
  • whether a variable has been initialized
  • whether a variable is in scope
  • or (for arrays/strings) the used length, or available size

as there is in other languages. Instead, this information should be maintained by the programmer, either by creating a struct to store this information or by asking the programmer to remember what's going on.

C is a systems programming language, and it's suitable for systems programming in part because it doesn't have this overhead like, say, Java or C# would.

OK, but why doesn't it work in a union?

What are the implications of the various sizes of the types being pointed to? Consider the following memory diagrams, where each character is 4 bits, an int is 32 bits, a short is 16 bits, and a char is 8 bits:

Nibbles:89ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF
[other ][data  ][int   ][int   ][int   ][mo][re][  ][da][ta]  // Ints
[other ][data  ][sh][or][t ][sh][or][t ][mo][re][  ][da][ta]  // Shorts
[other ][data  ][][][][][][][][][][][][][mo][re][  ][da][ta]  // Chars

Note that this is completely ignoring alignment and endianness issues; there are some platforms (including ARM, which I see in some of your other questions) where certain guarantees are made about alignment that could help you.(†)

However, the problem still remains for static memory or memory on the heap. Consider what would happen if you stored the string ABCDEFGHIJKL in your character array. Remembering that an ASCII A is 0x41, that would become the following in memory:

[other ][data  ]4142434445464748494A4B4C[mo][re][  ][da][ta]

Now imagine that you passed a pointer to C to your function which dereferences this as an integer:

                    [int   ]                                  // Int pointer to C
[other ][data  ][][][][][][][][][][][][][mo][re][  ][da][ta]  // Chars
[other ][data  ]4142434445464748494A4B4C[mo][re][  ][da][ta]
                    ^-- C is here; 0x43

Using an int pointer here will violate the C specification.

If that's not enough, and we assume your compiler behaves logically, it will attempt to dereference memory across a word boundary, which can throw a bus fault or usage fault (I forget what it actually does on ARMv7, but either one of those faults will terminate your program).

If that's still not enough, and it somehow does what's asked of it, the operation will produce a wrong answer, because you're working with the value 0x43444546 and not 0x43.


Some footnotes about memory alignment on ARM processors

(†) On ARM, for example, the ABI specifies that the stack must be word-aligned in normal use (sp % 4 == 0), in which case your code might work, as the diagram would look like this:

0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF
[other ][data  ][int   ][int   ][int   ][mo]    [re]    [  ]    [da]    [ta]
[other ][data  ][sh]    [or]    [t ]    [sh]    [or]    [t ]    [mo]    [re] ...
[other ][data  ][]      []      []      []      []      []      []      []   ...

The stack is also guaranteed to be doubleword aligned for public interfaces, and internally it doesn't have to be maintained, see 5.2.1 in the AAPCS for details. Nevertheless, this isn't something you want to rely on (portable code is preferable in most cases) or should even need to know unless you're writing a compiler or raw assembly code

share|improve this answer

This is a bad idea. See here:

void pointerfunction(int *p);
short b=20;
short c=20;
typedef union
{
  int *ptr1;
  short *ptr2;
  char *ptr3;
} pointers;

int main()
{
  pointers mypointers;

  mypointers.ptr2=&b;
  pointerfunction(mypointers.ptr2);
  printf("b=%d,c=%d\n", b,c);

  mypointers.ptr2=&c;
  pointerfunction(mypointers.ptr2);
  printf("b=%d,c=%d\n", b,c);

}


void pointerfunction(int *p)
{
  *p=*p*10;
}

which, on my system, prints:

b=200,c=200
b=200,c=2000

Is that what you wanted to happen?

share|improve this answer

It seems you want something like a template function. However, C does not support template functions or function overloading.

Since your three types have different sizes, you can infer the type from the pointer. So you can use a macro to create the feel of an overloaded function.

#define pointerfunction(x) do { \
    switch (sizeof(*x)) { \
    case sizeof(int):   pointerfunction_int((void *)x);   break; \
    case sizeof(short): pointerfunction_short((void *)x); break; \
    case sizeof(char):  pointerfunction_char((void *)x);  break; \
    default:            fprintf(stderr, "unknown pointer type for %p\n", x); \
                        break; \
    } \
} while (0)

#define pointerfunction_template(T) \
    void pointerfunction_ ## T (T *x) { *x = *x * 10; }

pointerfunction_template(int);
pointerfunction_template(short);
pointerfunction_template(char);

Then, you can use the macro like this:

int a=10;
short b=20;
char f=4;

int main () {
    pointerfunction(&a);
    pointerfunction(&b);
    pointerfunction(&f);
    return 0;
}

This technique won't work generally, though. In particular, it fails if two types have the same size. Then, you would be forced to embed the type itself into your macro call.

#define pointerfunction_call(T, x) pointerfunction_ ## T(x)

pointerfunction_template(float);
pointerfunction_template(double);

float g = 2.2;
double h = 3.1;

pointerfunction_call(float, &g);
pointerfunction_call(double, &h);
share|improve this answer

This can't work. You have no way of knowing the type of the pointer you are storing in the union.

You can define a struct which has the union as a member, and another field that says what kind of value you are using. Remember that the size of a pointer is the same no matter what it points to. I have not tested this, but you get the idea.

#include <stdio.h>

int a=10;
short b=20;
theChar f=4;

#define INT 1
#define SHORT 2
#define CHAR 4

typedef union 
{
int *ptr1;
short *ptr2;
char *ptr3;
}pointers;

typedef struct {
    pointers ps;
    type int;
} myStruct;


void pointerfunction(myStruct theStruct)
{
    switch (theStruct.type) {
        case INT:
            *(theStruct.ptr1) += 10;
            break;
        case SHORT:
            *(theStruct.ptr2) += 20;
            break;
        case CHAR:
            *(theStruct.ptr3) += 30;
            break;
    }
}


int main()
{
    // Example with a char
    myStruct theStruct;
    theStruct.type = CHAR;

    theStruct.ptr3=&theChar;

    pointerfunction(theStruct);
    printf("%d\n", *(theStruct.pointers.ptr3));
}
share|improve this answer
    
If the union contains only pointers you might as well just pass a void pointer and cast it, and not bother with the union. Conversion from a pointer to T to pointer to void and then back is guaranteed to give you the original pointer. – tinman Aug 15 '12 at 21:33
    
Agreed. I'm not the one asking the question! – Joe Aug 15 '12 at 21:34
    
Although there is the kernel of the idea of dynamic dispatch and/or some kind of polymorphism here. It's an idea worth spelling out, even if it is tautological at this level of simplicity. – Joe Aug 15 '12 at 21:37

C cannot do "generic" functions, at least not in the "do what I mean" sense that you get with C++ templates and function overloading:

template <typename T>
void pointerfunction(T *p)
{
  *p = *p * 10;
}
...
pointerfunction(&a);
pointerfunction(&b);
pointerfunction(&c);

At some point, your function has to know what the correct type of the pointer is in order to function properly; casting the pointer type to int * will cause problems with non-integral types.

One thing you can do is write a different function to handle each type of pointer, but call those functions through a common "generic" interface, like so:

void intfunc(void *p)   { int   *lp = *p; *lp *= 10; }
void charfunc(void *p)  { char  *lp = *p; *lp *= 10; }
void shortfunc(void *p) { short *lp = *p; *lp *= 10; }

void callfunc(void *data, void (*ptrfunc)(void *))
{
  ptrfunc(data);
}
...
callfunc(&a, intfunc);
callfunc(&b, shortfunc);
callfunc(&c, charfunc);

It isn't pretty, and unlike C++ templates it throws any pretense of type safety out the window (as soon as you start mucking with void *, you've lost any support from the compiler).

But...

This approach is pretty flexible, and you don't have to do anything too unnatural to get it to work.

share|improve this answer

This is a horrible idea for many many many many many reasons. The worst of which being the size of a char, int, or short is system dependent. So if you treat a 16bit char as a 32 bit int your going to be over writing data.

share|improve this answer
1  
C does not support function overloading. Your example is not C. – Billy ONeal Aug 15 '12 at 21:36
    
This is a valid point :-0 – 8bitwide Aug 15 '12 at 21:37

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