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I wrote a perl script to count the occurrences of a character in a file. So far this is what I have got,

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use warnings;
no warnings ('uninitialized', 'substr');

my $lines_ref;
my @lines;
my $count;

sub countModule()
{
my $file = "/test";
open my $fh, "<",$file or die "could not open $file: $!";
my @contents = $fh;
my @filtered = grep (/\// ,@contents);
return \@filtered;
}

@lines = countModule();
#@lines = $lines_ref;
$count = @lines;
print "###########\n $count \n###########\n";

My test file looks like this:

10.0.0.1/24
192.168.10.0/24
172.16.30.1/24

I am basically trying to count the number of instances of "/"

This is the output that I get:

###########
 1
###########

I am getting 1 instead of 3, which is the number of occurrences. Still learning perl, so any help will be appreciated..Thank you!!

share|improve this question
    
@contents = $fh ? grep ( /\/, ...) ? Are those typos? –  mob Aug 15 '12 at 22:27
    
oops, yes grep (/\// ,..) is the correct form –  user1428900 Aug 15 '12 at 22:31
    
related: stackoverflow.com/questions/10119717/… –  ThiefMaster Aug 16 '12 at 8:53
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Close, but a few issues:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub countModule
{
    my $file = "/test";
    open my $fh, "<",$file or die "could not open $file: $!";
    my @contents = <$fh>;  # The <> brackets are used to read from $fh.
    my @filtered = grep (/\// ,@contents);
    return @filtered;      # Remove the reference.
}

my @lines = countModule();
my $count = scalar @lines;  # 'scalar' is not required, but lends clarity.
print "###########\n $count \n###########\n";

Each of the changes I made to your code are annotated with a #comment explaining what was done.

Now in list context your subroutine will return the filtered lines. In scalar context it will return a count of how many lines were filtered.

You did also mention find the occurrences of a character (despite everything in your script being line-oriented). Perhaps your counter sub would look like this:

sub file_tallies{
    my $file = '/test';
    open my $fh, '<', $file or die $!;
    my $count;
    my $lines;
    while( <$fh> ) {
        $lines++;
        $count += $_ =~ tr[\/][\/];
    }
    return ( $lines, $count );
}

my( $line_count, $slash_count ) = file_tallies();
share|improve this answer
    
This counts the number of lines with a slash, not the number of slashes. Which may be fine, the spec is unclear. –  Bill Ruppert Aug 15 '12 at 22:47
    
I've added an update that tallies both lines and 'slash' counts, in case that was what he was after. –  DavidO Aug 16 '12 at 2:34
1  
@DavidO: Why no use strict, and what is the no warnings for? You never use $lines_ref, and @lines and $count should be declared where they are assigned. It is hard enough to get people to write respectable Perl without reputable answers displaying the same faux pas –  Borodin Aug 16 '12 at 3:23
1  
@Borodin Oh good grief, how did I not see that? I was attempting to change as little as possible in the OP's code to illustrate exactly what was needed to get it working. I've now removed. You're absolutely right. Thanks for the nudge. –  DavidO Aug 16 '12 at 6:18
    
Sorry, my question wasn't more specific...I wanted to calculate the number of occurrences rather than the number of lines...Your subroutine seems to work...Also could you please explain to me how the following statement works "$count += $_ =~ tr[\/][\/];" –  user1428900 Aug 16 '12 at 14:56
show 1 more comment

In list context,

return \@filtered;

returns a list with one element -- a reference to the named array @filtered. Maybe you wanted to return the list itself

return @filtered;
share|improve this answer
    
my print statement returns "0", when I try your edit...I tried to return the occurrences of "/"...is there a better way to do it?? –  user1428900 Aug 15 '12 at 22:35
add comment

Here are a few points about your code

  • You should always use strict at the top of your program, and only use no warnings for special reasons in a limited scope. There is no general reason why a working Perl program should need to disable warnings globally

  • Declare your variables close to their first point of use. The style of declaring everything at the top of the file is unnecessary and is a legacy of C

  • Never use prototypes in your code. They are available for very special purposes and shouldn't be used for the vast majority of Perl code. sub countModule() { ... } insists that countModule may never be called with any parameters and isn't necessary or useful. The definition should be just sub countModule { ... }

  • A big well done! for using a lexical file handle, the three-parameter form of open, and putting $! in your die string

  • my @contents = $fh will just set @contents to a single-element list containing just the filehandle. To read the whole file into the array you need my @contents = <$fh>

  • You can avoid escaping slashes in a regular expression if you use a different delimiter. To do that you need to use the m operator explicitly, like my @filtered = grep m|/|, @contents)

  • You return an array reference but assign the returned value to an array, so @lines = countModule() sets @lines to a single-element list containing just the array reference. You should either return a list with return @filtered or dereference the return value on assignment with @lines = @{ countModule }

If all you need to do is to print the number of lines in the file that contain a slash character then you could write something like this

use strict;
use warnings;

my $count;

sub countModule {
  open my $fh, '<', '/test' or die "Could not open $file: $!";
  return [ grep m|/|, <$fh> ];
}

my $lines = countModule;
$count = @$lines;
print "###########\n $count \n###########\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the detailed analysis..was very helpful...Sorry for not making my question a bit vague...I wanted to count the occurrences of the character and not the number of lines..Thank you! –  user1428900 Aug 16 '12 at 15:01
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Here's some simpler code:

sub countMatches {
    my ($file, $c) = @_;   # Pass parameters
    local $/;
    undef $/; # Slurp input
    open my $fh, "<",$file or die "could not open $file: $!";
    my $s = <$fh>;  # The <> brackets are used to read from $fh.
    close $fh;
    my $ptn = quotemeta($c);  # So we can match strings like ".*" verbatim
    my @hits = $s =~ m/($ptn)/g;
    0 + @hits
}

print countMatches ("/test", '/') . "\n";

The code pushes Perl beyond the very basics, but not too much. Salient points:

  1. By undeffing $/ you can read the input into one string. If you're counting occurrences of a string in a file, and not occurrences of lines that contain the string, this is usually easier to do.

  2. m/(...)/g will find all the hits, but if you want to count strings like "." you need to quote the meta characters in them.

  3. Store the results in an array to evaluate m// in list context

  4. Adding 0 to a list gives the number of items in it.

share|improve this answer
    
local $/ sets the local value of $/ to undefined; there is no reason to undef it as well. You have no reason to quotemeta $c the pattern; my @hits = $s =~ m/\Q$c/g is fine. The proper way to return the size of @hits is return scalar @hits. And if you're not interested in the actual strings matched you shouldn't use captures: just my $n = () = $s =~ m/\Q$c/g; return $n will work fine –  Borodin Aug 16 '12 at 3:18
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