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I know there are several other posts on this topic but they still leave me confused.

I've included jQuery and everything and, I have a simple javascript class like this example:

function CarConstructor(){
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
  this.fillKph=fillKph;
}

function fillKph(){
  $("#kphdiv").html(this.speed*1.61);
}

car1 = new CarConstructor();
car1.fillKph();

Now I know that that code snippet doesn't work and is not properly consturcted.

The "this" keyword there is referencing my dom element with the id of "kphdiv".

The question I have is what is the best way to handle this.

Ive seen one method where you set some variable equal to this (binding it) and then use that variable to reference your object. For example:

function CarConstructor(){
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
  this.fillKph=fillKph;
}

function fillKph(){
  var me=this;
  $("#kphdiv").html(me.speed*1.61);
}

car1 = new CarConstructor();
car1.fillKph();

I could also make the me a global variable ... I don't know.

I was just curious if there is another/better way.

share|improve this question
    
Ok so to put this one to rest, So if i do somethin like this: $("#"+buttonID).click(function(){ this.populate(); }); I need to make a global referance to my object ie. _this=this before referencing "this" inside the jquery function. –  Travis Jul 29 '09 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Oh boy, you are confusing quite a few things.

function CarConstructor(){
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
  this.fillKph; // <-> This particular statement has no meaning. 
  //When you write this.fillKph without any assignment, it will be 'undefined'. 
  //Just because you have a function named 'fillKph' somewhere else, 
  //it doesn't mean it will get attached to this property.
}

Try,

var toyota = new Car();
alert(typeof toyota.fillKph); //will alert undefined.

The fillKph function is created in global scope, i.e. as property of 'Window' object.

function fillKph(){
  var me=this;
  $("#kphdiv").html(me.speed*1.61);
}

To fix it, you can what rezzif suggested. Your final code will look like

function Car()
{
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
  this.fillKph = function (){
      $("#kphdiv").html(this.speed*1.61);
  };
}

car1 = new Car();
car1.fillKph();

If you notice, I did not store reference to 'this' inside a local variable. Why? There is no need in this scenario. To understand more, see my detailed answer here.

If you are going to create lot of Car objects, you can define the fillKph method on the prototype.

function Car()
{
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
}

Car.prototype.fillKph = function fillKph() { $("#kphdiv").html(this.speed*1.61); };

car1 = new Car();
car1.fillKph();

EDIT:

If you do something like,

function CarConstructor(){
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
  this.fillKph = fillKph;
}

function fillKph(){
  $("#kphdiv").html(me.speed*1.61);
}

car1 = new Car();
car1.fillKph(); //This will work as expected.

But the problem is that fillKph is defined in 'Window' scope, so I can directly call it like,

fillKph(); //Calling it this way will break it as it won't get correct 'this'.

Point is,

alert(typeof fillKph); // alerts 'function' if you do it your way,
alert(typeof fillKph); // alerts 'undefined', if you do it the way I suggested, which is preferred in my opinion.
share|improve this answer
    
I fixed my this.fillKph => this.fillKph=fillKph; typo ... Is that still bad form? –  Travis Jul 29 '09 at 3:07
    
wow ... answered ... and in detail ... thanks –  Travis Jul 29 '09 at 3:11
    
Travis, I edited my answer to clarify the doubt you have raised in your comment. –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:16
    
Could the downvoter clarify what's wrong with my answer? –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:20

function CarConstructor(){
  var _this = this;  
  this.speed=19; // in mph
  this.make="Ford";
  this.fillKph = function (){
      $("#kphdiv").html(_this.speed*1.61);
  };
}

car1 = new CarConstructor();
car1.fillKph();
share|improve this answer
    
aka: yes that is the best way? –  Travis Jul 29 '09 at 2:54
    
Depends, you can also define the fillKph function using the 'prototype' method. –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:07
    
That is the way i've always done it. It's always made sense to me to have functions as members of the object they're referencing. –  rezzif Jul 29 '09 at 3:10
    
Check this answer, stackoverflow.com/questions/1007340/…, where I explain why you may not want store the 'this' instance permanently. –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:14

There's completely nothing wrong with the latter method, it's perfectly fine and probably the most elegant way of doing it, it just stores a reference to the execution context in that point and time for use in another execution context where the reference points to a different object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, solid answer! Ill throw a vote at you as soon as I have enough reputation. –  Travis Jul 29 '09 at 2:53
1  
His existing code WILL never work as he never assigned the fillKph to any method inside his 'Car' function. Also, your answer doesn't make any sense to me. –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:06
    
By "latter method" I meant the second code snippet, which works. It inserts "30.590000000000003" into the division. –  meder Jul 29 '09 at 3:15
    
When you posted your original answer, he didn't have a working code. –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:20
    
Ok, well ignoring the function assignment which is a minimal error, what didn't make sense? Just curious. –  meder Jul 29 '09 at 6:28

The confusing thing about this in javascript is it's relationship to the new operator. As you walk up the scope chain, this always refers to the last occruance of new. If need be, that means going all the way back to the window object. So if you have something like this:

function MyObject() 
{ 
    this.baz = "some value"; 
    this.bar = function() { return this.baz; }
}
var foo = new MyObject();
alert(foo.bar());

it works as expected, because the foo variable was created with a new object/scope for the this keyword, and so the reference to this.baz points to the right place.

But then if you do this:

var foo = new MyObject();
var bar = foo.bar;
alert(bar());

expecting to call foo's bar function, you're now calling it outside of the "scope" created for foo by the new operator. Your use of this inside the bar function now looks at the window object, which doesn't have a definition for baz.

That may seem like an edge case, but it's important when working with frameworks like jQuery that create a lot of implicit objects using new or that expect you to pass functions around like variables. You have to be very careful.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure if if I agree with this sentence "this always refers to the last occurrence of new'. In JavaScript, interpreter will try to set 'this' based on how the method is called. You can force JS to set a particular 'this', using call or apply. More on this post, stackoverflow.com/questions/1007340/… –  SolutionYogi Jul 29 '09 at 3:38

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