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Below is my shell script from which I am trying to invoke few hive SQL queries which is working fine.

#!/bin/bash

DATE_YEST_FORMAT1=`perl -e 'use POSIX qw(strftime); print strftime "%Y-%m-%d",localtime(time()- 3600*504);'`
echo $DATE_YEST_FORMAT1

hive -e "
        SELECT t1 [0] AS buyer_id
            ,t1 [1] AS item_id
            ,created_time
        FROM (
            SELECT split(ckey, '\\\\|') AS t1
                ,created_time
            FROM (
                SELECT CONCAT (
                        buyer_id
                        ,'|'
                        ,item_id
                        ) AS ckey
                    ,created_time
                FROM dw_checkout_trans
                WHERE to_date(from_unixtime(cast(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(created_time) AS BIGINT))) = '$DATE_YEST_FORMAT1' distribute BY ckey sort BY ckey
                    ,created_time DESC
                ) a
            WHERE rank(ckey) < 1
            ) X
        ORDER BY buyer_id
            ,created_time DESC;"

sleep 120

QUERY1=`hive -e "
set mapred.job.queue.name=hdmi-technology;
SELECT SUM(total_items_purchased), SUM(total_items_missingormismatch) from lip_data_quality where dt='$DATE_YEST_FORMAT2';"`

Problem Statement:-

If you see my first hive -e block after the echo $DATE_YEST_FORMAT1. Sometimes that query gets failed due to certain reasons. So currently what happens is that, if the first Hive SQL query gets failed, then it goes to second Hive SQL query after sleeping for 120 seconds. And that is the thing I don't want. So Is there any way if the first query gets failed dues to any reasons, it should get stopped automatically at that point. And it should start running automatically from the starting again after few minutes(should be configurable)

Update:-

As suggested by Stephen.

I tried something like this-

#!/bin/bash

hive -e " blaah blaah;"

RET_VAL=$?
echo $RET_VAL
if [ $RET_VAL -ne 0]; then
echo "HiveQL failed due to certain reason" | mailx -s "LIP Query Failed" -r rj@host.com rj@host.com
exit(1)

I got something like this below as an error and I didn't got any email too. Anything wrong with my syntax and approach?

syntax error at line 152: `exit' unexpected

Note:-

Zero is success here if the Hive Query is executed successfully.

Another Update after putting the space:- After making changes like below

#!/bin/bash

hive -e " blaah blaah;"

RET_VAL=$?
echo $RET_VAL
if [ $RET_VAL -ne 0 ]; then
echo "HiveQL failed due to certain reason for LIP" | mailx -s "LIP Query Failed" -r rj@host.com rj@host.com
fi
exit

hive -e 'Another SQL Query;'

I got something like below-

RET_VAL=0
+ echo 0
0
+ [ 0 -ne 0 ]
+ exit

Status code was zero as my first query was successful but my program exited after that and it didn't went to execute my second query? Why? I am missing something here for sure again.

share|improve this question
    
Does the hive command make use of an exit status for success vs. failure? – Stephen P Aug 15 '12 at 23:16
    
Honestly I have no idea on that...!!! – lining Aug 15 '12 at 23:20
    
You can echo $? to see the exit status, so run a hive -e "blah blah" that you know will succeed, followed immediately by echo $? (if you do anything else in between those two commands you'll lose the exit status from "hive") -- then run hive again in a way that you know will fail, and echo $? again. – Stephen P Aug 16 '12 at 0:07
1  
@TechGeeky in case it wasn't obvious, fi is if spelled backwards and it's used to close an if statement. Similar for esac. Fortunately there is no rof or elihw. :-) – Stuart Marks Aug 16 '12 at 4:00
1  
You need a space before the closing square bracket. Better yet, use if hive ... as outlined in my previous comment. – tripleee Aug 16 '12 at 5:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unless I'm misunderstanding the situation, it's very simple:

#!/bin/bash

DATE_YEST_FORMAT1=`perl -e 'use POSIX qw(strftime); print strftime "%Y-%m-%d",localtime(time()- 3600*504);'`
echo $DATE_YEST_FORMAT1

QUERY0="
        SELECT t1 [0] AS buyer_id
            ,t1 [1] AS item_id
            ,created_time
        FROM (
            SELECT split(ckey, '\\\\|') AS t1
                ,created_time
            FROM (
                SELECT CONCAT (
                        buyer_id
                        ,'|'
                        ,item_id
                        ) AS ckey
                    ,created_time
                FROM dw_checkout_trans
                WHERE to_date(from_unixtime(cast(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(created_time) AS BIGINT))) = '$DATE_YEST_FORMAT1' distribute BY ckey sort BY ckey
                    ,created_time DESC
                ) a
            WHERE rank(ckey) < 1
            ) X
        ORDER BY buyer_id
            ,created_time DESC;"

if hive -e "$QUERY0"
then
    sleep 120
    QUERY1=`hive -e "
    set mapred.job.queue.name=hdmi-technology;
    SELECT SUM(total_items_purchased), SUM(total_items_missingormismatch) from lip_data_quality where dt='$DATE_YEST_FORMAT2';"`
    # ...and whatever you do with $QUERY1...
fi

The string $QUERY0 is for convenience, not necessity. The key point is that you can test whether a command succeeded (returned status 0) with the if statement. The test command (better known as [) is just a command that returns 0 when the tested condition is met, and 1 (non-zero) when it is not met.

So, the if statement runs the first hive query; if it passes (exit status 0), then (and only then) does it move on to the actions in the then clause.

I've resisted the temptation to reformat your SQL; suffice to say, it is not the layout I would use in my own code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jonathan for the detailed suggestion. Can you see my updated question and what wrong I am doing while sending the email if it got failed? – lining Aug 16 '12 at 4:25
    
@TechGeeky: The ] of the [ command must be a separate argument; spacing matters in shell scripts. Wrong: if [ $RET_VAL -ne 0]; then. Right: if [ $RET_VAL -ne 0 ]; then. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 16 '12 at 4:39
    
That's what I was thinking firstly.. I have already re-ran my script again by putting the space. let's see how it goes. Thanks for the help... – lining Aug 16 '12 at 4:41
    
Hi Jonathan, I saw very strange behavior, I updated my question with the details. Status code was zero as my first query was successful but my program exited after that and it didn't went to execute my second query? Why? I am missing something here for sure again. – lining Aug 16 '12 at 18:35
    
My Bad, I figure that out. fi is reverse of if and exit was after the if loop. – lining Aug 16 '12 at 18:37

You may also find useful setting the exit immediately option:

     set  -e      Exit immediately if a simple command (see SHELL  GRAMMAR
                  above) exits with a non-zero status.  The shell does not
                  exit if the command that fails is part  of  the  command
                  list  immediately  following  a  while or until keyword,
                  part of the test in an if statement, part of a && or  ||
                  list, or if the command's return value is being inverted
                  via !.  A trap on ERR, if set, is  executed  before  the
                  shell exits.

as in this example

#!/bin/bash

set -e
false
echo "Never reached"
share|improve this answer
    
What about If I need to notify myself about this failure, I updated my question with more detail. But somehow I am getting exception as test: ] missing. Any thoughts will be of great help.. – lining Aug 16 '12 at 4:33

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