Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm happily using the SpriteBatch class of the LibGDX Framework. My aim is to modify the representation of the sprite through a shader.

batch = new SpriteBatch(2, shaderProgram);

I copied the default shader from the SpriteBatch Class and added another uniform Sampler 2d

+ "uniform sampler2D u_Texture2;\n"//

Is there a working way to give the texture to the shader. Doing it like this, allways ends up in a ClearColor Screen.

batch.begin();
  texture2.bind(1);
  shaderProgram.setUniformi("u_Texture2", 1);
  batch.draw(spriteTexture,positions[0].x,positions[0].y);
  batch.draw(spriteTexture,positions[1].x,positions[1].y);
batch.end();

Each texture alone is working. Drawing manually with the help of the Mesh Class works as expected. So what can i do to use the convenience of SpriteBatch?

THX for Help

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I guess the problem there is related to texture bindings. SpriteBatch asumes that the active texture unit will be 0, so it makes a call to

lastTexture.bind(); instead of lastTexture.bind(0);

The problem is that the active unit you are giving it is 1 (as you call texture2.bind(1); in your code). so, texture unit 0 is never bound, and may be thats causing the blank screen.

For instance, i would add a Gdx.GL20.glActiveTexture(0); before the draw calls. I'm not quite sure it will solve the problem, but it's a start!

EDIT: I try my suggested solution and it works! :D. To be clearer, you should be doing this:

      batch.begin();
      texture2.bind(1); 
      shaderProgram.setUniformi("u_Texture2", 1);
      Gdx.gl.glActiveTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE0);//This is required by the SpriteBatch!!
             //have the unit0 activated, so when it calls bind(), it has the desired effect.
      batch.draw(spriteTexture,positions[0].x,positions[0].y);
      batch.draw(spriteTexture,positions[1].x,positions[1].y);
    batch.end();
share|improve this answer
    
hey finally i got an answere, thanks! You are right. It's cause of the way that class binds the texture. I need to say that i already made my own custom SpriteBatch Class out of it. SpriteBatch has shown also some issues in rendering bigger sized Framebuffer textures. And i always bind TEXTURE0 before. Thats why i decided to do it my way. Less convinient but way more flexible. Now i have a Sprite Batch which handles only the generation of the vertices. Everything arround can be customized with own shaders. –  fky Sep 7 '12 at 16:20
1  
Be aware that SpriteBatch does a little more than generating the vertices, if you are not carefull you'll run into performance issues. SpriteBatch itself has some 'usability' problems, but it's a design decision. It's intended to simplify the most common drawing operations, and somehow that hurts flexibility. Anyway, i've been able to solve most of the problems i ran into so far (most of the times it's enabling/disabling appropriate opengl flags before using it). Maybe tonight I'll try to implement multitexture like you did and let you know ;) –  Alejandro Cotroneo Sep 7 '12 at 17:33
1  
sry for being late again and Thanks for your support. It's working like you edited. BUT, i don't like it. This looks kind a dangerous for me. I prefer my specialized version which is also faster and better debuggable cause of its smaller size. SpriteBatch is trying to make everybody happy. It's not really a performance optimised Class in my opinion. But anyway, thanks for making clear that SpriteBatch is using LAST BOUND texture and not just TEXTURE0 –  fky Sep 17 '12 at 15:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.