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I have been reading the SWF format available on Adobe's site and it mentions that in order to save space, variable bits are used to store integers or floats (page 17 in the pdf)

I have always worked with byte-aligned data so have not given much thought to files that are bit-aligned, or have variable alignment where the information is stored in each byte.

So for example, you may have a struct containing four 13-bit integers stored sequentially ( rather than storing them as four 16-bit integers).

The first 13bits is the first integer, the next 13 bits is the second integer, and so on. It pads the last byte appropriate to make the struct byte-aligned with the rest of the file, so 52-bits would be padded to 56-bits, requiring 7 bytes to store those four integers as opposed to 8 bytes.

  • How do I approach this kind of problem?
  • How can I work with a stream of bytes at the bit-level?
  • Is there something I can use to help make it easier to work with this data?

I imagine the solution boils down to using bit-operations on byte arrays.

An example solution for parsing the four 13-bit integers would be nice as well to demonstrate the use of your suggested method.

share|improve this question
    
..because I can't give you a full answer, perhaps at least pointing you to BitArray will help :) –  Simon Whitehead Aug 16 '12 at 0:41
1  
Typically the approach is keeping a buffer of bits in an uint or ulong, extracting what you need and shifting in a new byte of input when there aren't enough bits in the buffer. –  harold Aug 16 '12 at 9:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two ways of dealing with this that I know of. The first is to manually do it - using bit-wise operators, division, modulus etc. on byte arrays [or integer/ulong etc if you were bored]. IsBitSet Example

The other way is a BitArray - which handles most of this for you :)


It would be nice to add an example of how exactly BitArray handles getting bits 13..25 as an int, as that would be the primary operation. At a first glance I see only a loop.

Fine... I wrote a quick & dirty test proof of concept:

var rnd = new Random();
//var data = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ToArray();
var data = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Select(x => rnd.Next(1 << 13)).ToArray();

foreach (var n in data) Console.WriteLine(n);

Console.WriteLine(new string('-', 13));

var bits = new BitArray(data.Length * 13);

for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
{
    var intBits = new BitArray(new[] { data[i] });
    for (int b = 12; b > -1; b--)
    {
        bits[i * 13 + b] = intBits[b];
        Console.Write(intBits[b] ? 1 : 0);
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}
Console.WriteLine(new string('-', 13));

for (int i = 0; i < bits.Length / 13; i++)
{
    int number = 0;
    for (int b = 12; b > -1; b--)
        if (bits[i * 13 + b])
            number += 1 << b;

    Console.WriteLine(number);
}
Console.ReadLine();

Which outputs:

910
3934
7326
7990
7712
1178
6380
3460
5113
7489
-------------
0001110001110
0111101011110
1110010011110
1111100110110
1111000100000
0010010011010
1100011101100
0110110000100
1001111111001
1110101000001
-------------
910
3934
7326
7990
7712
1178
6380
3460
5113
7489

The bit array doesn't do much other than simplify accessing - it's still quite manual. I expect you'd write your own classes to simply this and make it neat and reusable - for example here's another quick concept:

//Improved to take sign into account.
//Sign is in addition to bits allocated for storage in this version.
//Stored as {sign}{bits}
//E.g.  -5, stored in 3 bits signed is:
//       1 101
//E.g.   5, stored in 3 bits [with sign turned on]
//       0 101
//E.g.   5, stored in 3 bits no sign
//         101  
//This may differ from your exiting format - e.g. you may use two's compliments.
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int bitsPerInt = 13;

    //Create your data
    var rnd = new Random();
    //var data = Enumerable.Range(-5, 10).ToArray();
    var data = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Select(x => rnd.Next(-(1 << bitsPerInt), 1 << bitsPerInt)).ToArray();

    var bits = new BitSerlializer();

    //Add length header
    bits.AddInt(data.Length, 8, false);
    foreach (var n in data)
    {
        bits.AddInt(n, bitsPerInt);
        Console.WriteLine(n);
    }

    //Serialize to bytes for network transfer etc.
    var bytes = bits.ToBytes();

    Console.WriteLine(new string('-', 10));
    foreach (var b in bytes) Console.WriteLine(Convert.ToString(b, 2).PadLeft(8, '0'));
    Console.WriteLine(new string('-', 10));

    //Deserialize
    bits = new BitSerlializer(bytes);
    //Get Length Header
    var count = bits.ReadInt(8, false);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        Console.WriteLine(bits.ReadInt(bitsPerInt));

    Console.ReadLine();
}

public class BitSerlializer
{
    List<byte> bytes;
    int Position { get; set; }

    public BitSerlializer(byte[] initialData = null)
    {
        if (initialData == null)
            bytes = new List<byte>();
        else
            bytes = new List<byte>(initialData);
    }

    public byte[] ToBytes() { return bytes.ToArray(); }

    public void Addbit(bool val)
    {
        if (Position % 8 == 0) bytes.Add(0);
        if (val) bytes[Position / 8] += (byte)(128 >> (Position % 8));
        Position++;
    }

    public void AddInt(int i, int length, bool isSigned = true)
    {
        if (isSigned) Addbit(i < 0);
        if (i < 0) i = -i;

        for (int pos = --length; pos >= 0; pos--)
        {
            var val = (i & (1 << pos)) != 0;
            Addbit(val);
        }
    }

    public bool ReadBit()
    {
        var val = (bytes[Position / 8] & (128 >> (Position % 8))) != 0;
        ++Position;
        return val;
    }

    public int ReadInt(int length, bool isSigned = true)
    {
        var val = 0;
        var sign = isSigned && ReadBit() ? -1 : 1;

        for (int pos = --length; pos >= 0; pos--)
            if (ReadBit())
                val += 1 << pos;

        return val * sign;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It would be nice to add an example of how exactly BitArray handles getting bits 13..25 as an int, as that would be the primary operation. At a first glance I see only a loop. –  Eugene Ryabtsev Aug 16 '12 at 6:01
    
Whoa! I'm impressed. I believe this does not address the sign and its extension, also not sure if performance is also of consideration - Keikoku did not mention it, so probably not. Otherwise an excellent example of an extensive answer. That's +1. –  Eugene Ryabtsev Aug 16 '12 at 8:30
    
@EugeneRyabtsev - good catch, added in the sign in my second version. –  NPSF3000 Aug 16 '12 at 10:21

On the other hand, byte-array-based approach could go like this:

    int extend(uint raw, int bits)
    {
        int sh = 32 - bits;
        int x = (int)raw << sh; // puts your sign bit in the highest bit.
        return x >> sh;  // since x is signed this is an arithmatic signed shift
    }

    int read(byte[] data, int pos, int bits, bool signed)
    {
        int fbi = pos / 8; // first byte index
        int lbi = (pos + bits - 1) / 8; // last byte index
        int cnt = lbi - fbi + 1; // bytes spanned
        if (cnt > 3 || lbi >= data.Length) { throw new ArgumentException(); }

        uint raw = (uint)(
            (data[fbi] << (24 + pos % 8)) + 
            (cnt < 2 ? 0 : data[fbi + 1] << (16 + pos % 8)) + 
            (cnt < 3 ? 0 : data[fbi + 2] << (8 + pos % 8))
            ) >> (32 - bits);
        return signed ? extend(raw, bits) : (int)raw;
    }

Test for this:

    byte[] test = { 0x55, 0xAA, 0x10 };

    string s = "";
    s += read(test, 0, 8, false) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 0, 8, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 8, 8, false) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 8, 8, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 4, 8, false) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 9, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 10, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 11, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 12, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 13, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 14, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 15, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 16, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 7, 17, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 18, 2, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 18, 3, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 23, 1, true) + "\r\n";
    s += read(test, 23, 2, true) + "\r\n";

The test builds the string like the following:

    85
    85
    170
    -86
    90
    -86
    -172
    -344
    -688
    -1375
    -2750
    -5500
    -11000
    -22000
    1
    2
    0

then throws an exception on the last line.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting system. Missing write capability... and should be generalized to deal with arbitrary length bit strings [so you can easily write functions to serialize more than int's]. –  NPSF3000 Aug 17 '12 at 4:59

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