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I am at a cross roads for developing some REST APIs and I have found no real discussion on the subject much less a firm defense of either.

It's my understand that with REST you have /<resource>/<action> as your URL

So, to disable a user you would have:

PUT /user/disable

Seems reasonable. However, we have the debate going on out more basic methods:

should it be:

POST /user  (creates a user *implicitly*)
POST /user/create (creates a user *explicitly*)

DELETE /user/:id
DELETE /user/:id/delete

The first seems to be what is considered "the standard" and the second is obviously much more clear in it's intent and is consistent with methods like /user/disable

Maybe this debate has raged elsewhere but I have not seen it. If you're 'religious' about this, now's your chance to pontificate

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I'd say PUT /user/12 and send disabled=1. I think this is more a religious thing (suited for forum) than something that has one answer (suited for SO). Voted to close as not constructive. –  kapa Aug 16 '12 at 1:29
1  
I suggest being explicit (eg /user/create). This is self-documenting rather than needing explanation or trial-and-error for users. In the DELETE case, the delete method is self-explanatory so the url needn't contain it. If you were using POST, the opposite would be true and POST /user/:id/delete would be essential. –  jowierun Aug 16 '12 at 2:01

2 Answers 2

Having /<resource>/<action> as your URL is not REST. REST uses HTTP verbs to determine actions to perform on a given resource, or on a collection of resources. That means:

  • Creating a resource is: POST /users
  • Reading a resource is: GET /users/<id>
  • Updating (replacing actually) a resource is: PUT /users/<id>
  • Deleting a resource is: DELETE /users/<id>

That's REST.

For all other methods, you can use other verbs like PATCH. Disabling a user could be:

PATCH /users/<id>/disable

It's not pure REST but it's ok.

Edit: If you want to be REST compliant, disabling a user means you want to change his state. In other words, you want to change one of its properties like a state flag. You can "patch" your resource:

PATCH /users/<id>?state=disabled

This is REST. You can also replace the resource by using PUT as described in the comments.

share|improve this answer
    
To elaborate: to make a true REST, instead of having an action ("disable") in the URI, you should send a PUT request which is switching the resourced "disabled" field to True, 1, or whatever you're using to denote that. When doing REST you should always think in terms of "how an action changes my resource?" If the action is too complex to simply change a resource, or includes a number of resources, then REST is not the best way to do it. –  Berislav Lopac Aug 16 '12 at 8:31
1  
True. Oh, and you could send a PATCH request with only the diff of the "disabled" field (false -> true) instead of the complete resource with PUT. –  William DURAND Aug 16 '12 at 8:36
    
@WilliamDURAND you make clear that the /<resource>/<action>/ paradigm is not REST but then say to use PATCH followed by "It's not pure REST but it's ok". I am trying to understand how those 2 claims mesh. I make no claim to be a REST expert here and I like the idea of using PATCH (what I read about it seems to suggest that this is an appropriate use). I get the sense REST+WS is still a work-in-progress. In addition, there are paradigm collisions between REST and OO programming languages that want to represent data as objects and map URLs to functions/actions Appreciate the input. Thanks –  Christian Bongiorno Aug 16 '12 at 18:23
    
@BerislavLopac so, you're saying PUT /user body: { "id":"123", "status":"disabled" } and this is preferrable to "PUT /user/123/disable" ? It is functionally identical without the programming inconvenience of accepting a payload body. See my comment about colliding paradigms –  Christian Bongiorno Aug 16 '12 at 18:24
    
@Christian Bongorno: No, not exactly. You see, the point of REST are the resources, which are uniquely identified by URIs. So in this case the URI wouldn't be /user but /user/123, and the body would contain all the fields in the new state (one of which would be "status"). You could use PATCH instead of PUT to update just one field, but that's not yet officially recognized by the HTTP protocol. –  Berislav Lopac Aug 17 '12 at 12:27

@Christian Bongiorno

You are encoding actions in URIs which has nothing to do with REST. It's a clearest form of RPC.

You need to identify resource and perform actions on these resources with methods defined in underlying protocol you use(i.e. HTTP in your case). HTTP spec defines semantics for these methods so instead of encoding actions directly in URIs you must do following:

  • GET /users - returns list of users(each entry/item with its own link to particular user)
  • GET /users/:id - returns particular user
  • POST /users - creates new user under /users resource
  • POST /users/:id - edits user (alternatively PATCH method can be used here)
  • PUT /users/:id - replaces user
  • DELETE /users/:id - removes user

This is how you should think about actions. But this is not enough you need to use media format which provide support for such hypermedia controls as links(as minimum) in order to be able to describe these actions, for example see:

Some quick interaction examples:

***Request***
GET /users HTTP/1.1
Host: service.org
Accept: application/x+json

***Response***
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/x+json
Content-Length: ...

[{
  "name": "john",
  "links": {
    "self": "/users/1",
    "edit": "/users/1"
  }
}, {
  "name": "jane",
  "links": {
    "self": "/users/2",
    "edit": "/users/2"
  }
}]

***Request***
GET /users/2 HTTP/1.1
Host: service.org
Accept: application/x+json

***Response***
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/x+json
Content-Length: ...
{
  "name": "jane",
  "links": {
    "self": "/users/2",
    "edit": "/users/2"
  }
}

***Request***
DELETE /users/2 HTTP/1.1
Host: service.org

***Response***
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Length: ...

Resource was destroyed...

***Request***
POST /users/2 HTTP/1.1
Host: service.org
Content-Type: application/x+json
Content-Lenght: ...

{"status": "disabled"}

***Response***
HTTP/1.1 303 See Other
Location: /users/2
share|improve this answer
    
Having read this and reviewed the links you sent (one of the RFCs is a week old) I am convinced of a few things: 1) How to use REST/HTTP for total machine interaction is WIP 2) REST describes methodologies and paradigms that may be inappropriate or out-of-scope for your needs 3) There are very clear paradigm conflicts between using REST and implementing said state transfer using popular programming languages. 4) Designing APIs for m2m as well as h2m requires significant trade-off consideration (When this was strictly compiled code it was never a concern) Appreciate the input. Thanks –  Christian Bongiorno Aug 16 '12 at 18:43
    
ok ------------------------------- –  ioseb Aug 16 '12 at 21:50

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