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XML keeps throwing me curve balls. I am having a hard time finding a manual I can understand. So I apologize for all the questions in the past couple of days.

In any case, I have the following XML:

      <clade>
        <clade>
          <branch_length>0.5</branch_length>
          <clade>
            <name>MnPV1</name>
            <annotation>
<desc>Iotapapillomavirus 1</desc></annotation><chart><group>Iota</group></chart><branch_length>1.0</branch_length>
          </clade>
          <clade> 

I would like to change this to:

  <clade>
    <clade>
      <branch_length>0.5</branch_length>
      <clade>
        <name bgstyle="green">MnPV1</name>
        <annotation><desc>Iotapapillomavirus 1</desc><uri>http://pave.niaid.nih.gov/#fetch?id=MnPV1REF&amp;format=Locus%20view&amp;hasStructure=none</uri></annotation><chart><group>Iota</group></chart><branch_length>1.0</branch_length>
      </clade>
      <clade>

So I want to change:

<name>MnPV1</name>

to:

<name bgstyle="green">MnPV1</name>

The catch is, that I am looking for whether :

tree.xpath('//phylo:group[text()="Iota"]

If it is I would like to get the "uncle" of "group" node so I can edit the "name" node

This is what I came up with so far:

tree = lxml.etree.XML(data)
nsmap = {'phylo': 'http://www.phyloxml.org'}
matches = tree.xpath('//phylo:group[text()="Iota"]', namespaces=nsmap)
for e in matches:
    uncle=e.getparent().getsibling() #however, getsibling() does not exist...

I would appreciate any help (and/or recommendations for lxml for dummies).

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1  
There is a getnext() method that does I think what you mean by getsibling(). –  Bob the Angry Coder Aug 16 '12 at 2:08
2  
@Stylize, I would highly recommend learning XSLT if you are going to be working with XML documents a lot. I rarely manipulate XML documents using anything else. –  D.Shawley Aug 16 '12 at 13:29
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about this?

>>> data = r'''<clade>
...  <name>MnPV1</name>
...  <annotation>
...    <desc>Iotapapillomavirus 1</desc>
...  </annotation>
...  <chart>
...    <group>Iota</group>
...  </chart>
...  <branch_length>1.0</branch_length>
... </clade>'''
...
>>> tree = lxml.etree.XML(data)
>>> for name in tree.xpath('//group[text()="Iota"]/../preceding-sibling::name'):
...   name.attrib['bgstyle'] = 'green'
...
>>> print lxml.etree.tostring(tree, pretty_print=True)
<clade>
 <name bgstyle="green">MnPV1</name>
 <annotation>
   <desc>Iotapapillomavirus 1</desc>
 </annotation>
 <chart>
   <group>Iota</group>
 </chart>
 <branch_length>1.0</branch_length>
</clade>

>>>

The trick is to use XML tools (e.g., XPath and XSLT) to manipulate XML documents. The w3schools sites are pretty good starting points. XPath is fairly powerful in its own right and is quite readable once you get the hang of it. This type of problem is best solved using XSLT though. If you are going to be manipulating a bunch of XML, do yourself a huge favor and purchase a copy of the Oxygen XML editor or something similar.

If you are looking for something using less XPath and more Python, then use the getparent followed by calls to getprevious. I'm not sure how well supported getparent and getprevious are, but they are documented and do work.

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Here is a simple XSLT solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="clade[chart/group='Iota']/name">
  <name bgstyle="green"><xsl:apply-templates/></name>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<clade>
    <clade>
        <branch_length>0.5</branch_length>
        <clade>
            <name>MnPV1</name>
            <annotation>
                <desc>Iotapapillomavirus 1</desc>
            </annotation>
            <chart>
                <group>Iota</group>
            </chart>
            <branch_length>1.0</branch_length>
        </clade>
    </clade>
</clade>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<clade>
   <clade>
      <branch_length>0.5</branch_length>
      <clade>
         <name bgstyle="green">MnPV1</name>
         <annotation>
            <desc>Iotapapillomavirus 1</desc>
         </annotation>
         <chart>
            <group>Iota</group>
         </chart>
         <branch_length>1.0</branch_length>
      </clade>
   </clade>
</clade>

Explanation:

  1. Use and override of the identity rule, which copies every node "as-is" (for which it is selected for execution).

  2. Simple overriding template matching the wanted name element and replacing it with an identically named element that has the desired new attribute.

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