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For some reason this code results in a truncated text.txt file. It should (according to me) write out 1000 results, but the output file has various amounts of lines (depending on the run). Weirdly, the writing to the file stops in the middle of the write command, such that a line may not be complete. Currently, the last three lines of the text file for the latest run was as follows:

749, 78.97988, 97.80454, 99.6625, 94.00000015258789
750, 4.1745043, 86.64212, 107.59311, 71.00000008583069
751,

and that's it. Nothing else after that.

Here is the code:

import java.io.BufferedWriter;
import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.Writer;
import java.util.Random;

public class ColorGrayScale {

/**
 * @param args
 * @throws IOException
 */
@SuppressWarnings("resource")
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    Writer out = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("test.txt"),16*1024);
    Random generator = new Random();
    float red = 0, green = 0, blue = 0;
    int i = 0;

    while (i<1000) {

        float grey = generator.nextInt(127) + 64;
        int sequence = generator.nextInt(6) + 1; // to pick from 1 of six
                                                    // orders
        switch (sequence) { // the various orders that red green and blue
                            // are going to be in
        case 1:
            red = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * (grey / .21));
            green = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * ((grey - (red * .21)) / .71));
            blue = (float) ((grey - (red * .21) - (green * .71)) / 0.08);
            break;
        case 2:
            red = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * (grey / .21));
            blue = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * ((grey - (red * .21)) / .08));
            green = (float) ((grey - (red * .21) - (blue * .08)) / 0.71);
            break;
        case 3:
            green = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * (grey / .71));
            red = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * ((grey - (green * .71)) / .21));
            blue = (float) ((grey - (red * .21) - (green * .71)) / .08);
            break;
        case 4:
            green = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * (grey / .71));
            blue = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * ((grey - (green * .71)) / .08));
            red = (float) ((grey - (green * .71) - (blue * .08)) / .21);
            break;
        case 5:
            blue = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * (grey / .08));
            red = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * ((grey - (blue * .08)) / .21));
            green = (float) ((grey - (blue * .08) - (red * .21)) / .71);
            break;
        case 6:
            blue = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * (grey / .08));
            green = (float) (generator.nextFloat() * ((grey - (blue * .08)) / .71));
            red = (float) ((grey - (blue * .08) - (green * .71)) / .21);
            break;
        }
        if (red < 256 && blue < 256 && green < 256) {
             out.write("" + i + ", " + red + ", " + green + ", " + blue
                    + ", " + (.21 * red + .71 * green + 0.08 * blue + "\n"));
            i++;
        }
    }
}

}

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1  
I think you should ensure close() gets called on the out object. –  Rob I Aug 16 '12 at 1:42
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You forgot to close() the writer, so you never gave it a chance to flush buffered output to disk.

share|improve this answer
    
There it is! Thanks so much! –  user1602004 Aug 16 '12 at 1:54
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Two things.

  1. Flush the stream
  2. Close the stream

Try something like:

 Writer out = null;
 try {
    out = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("test.txt"),16*1024);

    // Write some stuff

    out.flush();
 } finally {
    try {
        out.close();
    } catch (Exception exp) {
    }
}

Try and remember, it's a "buffer". That means that it's keeping stuff stored in memory until it decides it needs to be written or your explicitly ask it to "flush" it's contents.

Also, you should always close your streams. This prevents possible locked file issues and file handle issues :P

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There's no need to flush() the stream unless something else wants to start reading it before you've finished writing it or there's a chance that close() will never be called. –  Adrian Pronk Aug 16 '12 at 2:41
    
@AdrianPronk I'm just paranoid :D –  MadProgrammer Aug 16 '12 at 3:09
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You should consider flushing your stream after each write. Try something like this:

try{
    //your code
    out.write("" + i + ", " + red + ", " + green + ", " + blue
            + ", " + (.21 * red + .71 * green + 0.08 * blue + "\n"));
    i++;
}finally{
    //Close the stream
    out.close();
}

Also you should make sure that you close your stream at the end of your operation. A good way to structure your program might be this:

Random generator = new Random();
float red = 0, green = 0, blue = 0;
int i = 0;

Writer out = null;

try{
    out = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("test.txt"), 16 * 1024);

    while (i < 1000) {
        //your logic
        if (red < 256 && blue < 256 && green < 256) {
                out.write("" + i + ", " + red + ", " + green + ", " + blue
                        + ", " + (.21 * red + .71 * green + 0.08 * blue + "\n"));
                i++;
        }
    }
}finally{
    if(out != null){
        out.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Why flush after every iteration? Isn't that inefficient? Probably, the buffer size could be set explicitly to let the writer decide when to flush, if the default buffer size is not the one desired. –  Vikdor Aug 16 '12 at 1:55
    
@Vikdor - I concur. It was inefficient. Updated my answer! Thanks for pointing that out :) –  Sujay Aug 16 '12 at 2:02
1  
Calling flush() immediately before close() on the standard Writers and OutputStreams in the java.io package is redundant. They all ensure they flush their output when you call close(). –  Adrian Pronk Aug 16 '12 at 2:33
    
@AdrianPronk: Point taken! –  Sujay Aug 16 '12 at 2:43
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