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I am writing a program that utilizes a thread pool in order to search through files of a specified extension for matches to a regex expression.

My thread pool looks like this:

for( int i = 0; i < _nThreads; ++i )
    {
            _threads.push_back( thread( &ThreadPool::GrepFunc, this ) );
    }

and the running function looks like this:

void ThreadPool::GrepFunc()
{
    // implement a barrier

while( !_done )
{
    while( !_tasks.empty() )
    {
        fs::path task;
        bool gotTask = false;
        {
            lock_guard<mutex> tl( _taskMutex );
            if( !_tasks.empty() )
            {
                task = _tasks.front();
                _tasks.pop();
                gotTask = true;
            }
        }

        if( gotTask )
        {
            if( std::tr2::sys::is_directory( task ) )
            {
                for( fs::directory_iterator dirIter( task ), endIter; dirIter != endIter; ++dirIter )
                {
                    if( fs::is_directory( dirIter->path() ) )
                    {
                        { lock_guard<mutex> tl( _taskMutex );
                        _tasks.push( dirIter->path() ); }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        for( auto& e : _args.extensions() )
                        {
                            if( !dirIter->path().extension().compare( e ) )
                            {
                                SearchFile( dirIter->path() );
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            else
            {
                for( auto& e : _args.extensions() )
                {
                    if( !task.extension().compare( e ) )
                    {
                        SearchFile( task );
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
}

Essentially the program receives an initial directory from the user and will recursively search through it and all sub directories for files matching the extension looking for regex matches. I am having trouble figuring out how to determine the stopping case for when _done has been reached. I need to ensure that all directories and files inside the initial directory have been scanned and also that all items inside of _tasks have been completed before I join the threads back. Any thoughts would really be appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd suggest having one thread (possibly the same thread spawning the file-processing threads) dedicated to doing the recursive filesystem search for matching files; it can add the files into a work queue from which the file-searching threads can pick up work. You can use a condition variable to coordinate this.

Coordinating shutdown is a little tricky, as you've found. After the filesystem-search thread has completed its search, it can set some "just finish what's queued" flag visible to the worker threads then signal them all to wake up and try to process another file: if they find the file/work queue empty they exit. The filesystem-search thread then joins all workers.

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I know this works as this was actually how I implemented things in the first version of my program. I just had a single loop using a recursive_directory_iterator that did the scan and passed in files matching the extensions to the worker threads. However, through testing on larger directories I found that the majority of runtime was actually spent on the recursive search so I've been trying to thread the search itself as well as practice for threading and optimization. If I can't find a solution I'll go back to that but I was really hoping to find a way to make this work. –  Jesse Carter Aug 16 '12 at 3:00
    
Well, the reason I suggested a single filesystem search thread was that with multiple threads you may find your disk head jumping around and end up with worse performance, but it will depend on the disk technology you're using: heavily raided disks will have better concurrency, SSDs better seek times. So yes - you could create another queue for subdirectories to search... another threadpool of workers to scan those subdirectories and add sub-subdirs to the queue. –  Tony D Aug 16 '12 at 3:25

Regarding your updated question in the comment of Tony's answer, I would suggest to have 2 kind of tasks: one for exploring the subdirectories recursively and one for grep. You need a SynQueue<TaskBase>, TaskSubDir: TaskBase, and TaskGrep: TaskBase. TaskBase has a virtual interface functon Run(). Then the threads can pop repeatedly from SynQueue, and call TaskBase::Run():

  1. if it got a TaskSubDir, then it would find sub-directories and files in a given path: (a) if it is a folder, add a new TaskSubDir of the sub-dir to SynQueue, such that the folders are searched recursively with the threadpool; (b) if it is a file with matched extension, then it pushs a TaskGrep to SynQueue.
  2. if it got a TaskGrep, then it performs the SearchFile.
  3. if the queue is empty, break out of the worker function.

Doing so, you don't need to have 2 queues and wait for the sub-directory queue to finish before starting the grep queue.

So answering your question: to determine the joining condition, all you need to do is to wait for all the threads to break out of the worker function.

Final note: the first _tasks.empty() in your code is not protected by mutex and may suffers from racing condition. I suggest you to hide the mutex and cond_var in a SynQueue class, and add a SynQueue::empty() member function (protected by mutex). If efficiency is your concern, you may want to consider Lock-free queue to replace SynQueue.

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I am a little confused about your answer as I don't quite see how it differs from mine. As it stands I don't have seperate queues. All the tasks are in the same queue as they are path objects and I can simply handle them by checking to see if they are directories or not so the need for that level of class abstraction seems unnecessary. Also, if I use the queue empty condition to break out how can I guarantee that the program is actually done searching? The timing could potentially work out that the check is done while there are no tasks present though one is about to be added. –  Jesse Carter Aug 16 '12 at 4:54
    
@JesseCarter, The main difference is that your worker function processes the sub-folders and files in a big if (gotTask) clause; while I break it down into smaller tasks. Doing so can effectively resolve the problem you mentioned: some threads break out of the worker function, while actually not all the tasks have been processed. –  user2k5 Aug 16 '12 at 5:31

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