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I've not been able to find anything on this topic, oddly; I figured it'd be a pretty common issue!

What I've got is a parent div with a border-radius to make the div circular. Nested in that div, I've got several child divs that I would like:

  • Positioned directly on the visible circular borders (as opposed to the invisible square "border" that surrounds the div -- this jsFiddle hopefully will clarify what I'm trying to say here).
  • In addition, I'd like to be able to precisely position the child divs along different points of this border (so, something like "position childDiv1 at the 90deg position [or the 105deg position, 120deg, 135deg, etc.] of the circular parent div" instead of having to use top and left or assign absolute pixel values or something).

Still an amateur trying to figure out CSS positioning, so I'm not even sure if any of this is possible, haha. Looking forward to any input you guys can provide!

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Do the children divs need to be pixel width or can they be % ? I think I can make this, but percentages would be simpler. –  d-_-b Aug 16 '12 at 3:05
1  
If all your DIVs are in fixed scale, you can still calculate the position (by hand or by javascript)... e.g. Your parent DIV in fiddle is a 150 radius circle, and child DIV is 30 length squares, so a 90deg child DIV (count by the center point) can be: left (150-15)px, top (150-sqrt(150^2-15^2))px. –  Passerby Aug 16 '12 at 3:09
    
I think you'll have to calculate it, jsfiddle.net/zSdsg/9 –  Musa Aug 16 '12 at 3:10
    
>iight - The child divs can be percentage-width if need be! –  Aujury Aug 16 '12 at 4:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use css3 transform and transform-origin to achieve this

<div id="parent">
    <div class="child" id="child1"></div>
    <div class="child" id="child2"></div>
    <div class="child" id="child3"></div>
    <div class="child" id="child4"></div>
</div>
#parent {
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    border: 1px dotted #000;
    border-radius: 150px;
}

.child {
    position: absolute;
    width: 30px;
    height: 30px;
    background-color: #666;
    left: 135px;
}
#child1{
    transform: rotate(90deg);
    transform-origin:50% 150px;
}
#child2{
    transform: rotate(105deg);
    transform-origin:50% 150px;
}
#child3{
    transform: rotate(120deg);
    transform-origin:50% 150px;
}
#child4{
    transform: rotate(135deg);
    transform-origin:50% 150px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/zSdsg/20/

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This is actually exactly what I'm looking for!! Obviously I'll have to craft some sort of IE 6-8 workaround, but this is exactly what I needed. Thanks a bunch; this'll be super useful. :D –  Aujury Aug 16 '12 at 4:28

http://jsfiddle.net/zSdsg/15/ (updated to show that top:0 does not protrude the circle.)

Or http://jsfiddle.net/zSdsg/17/, which just looks a lot cooler :}

EDIT: I think I misunderstood your question. I will update or delete my answer depending on...my answer.

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By using top:0 and things like that, in theory your squares would stick out of the circle...... –  Passerby Aug 16 '12 at 3:16
    
Please see my updated jsfiddle link...But If this doesn't work, then in theory, he will need to use overflow:hidden on the bigger circle, or not use squares for the children divs –  d-_-b Aug 16 '12 at 3:27
    
It looks like regardless of what I try to do, the positions are still gonna have to be manually discovered and set, yes? (So, instead of saying "go to position 90deg", I've gotta say "go to top: 44%; right: 0;") With that in mind, though, this particular setup looks great, and I think I'll just have to sit down and work out the exact percentage positioning for each of my divs. :P Thanks for this!! –  Aujury Aug 16 '12 at 4:24
    
er, I only just noticed that there are other answers below this one, and one of them actually provided exactly what I was searching for. iight's answer still provides some excellent insight, though! Thanks, iight! –  Aujury Aug 16 '12 at 4:30

http://jsfiddle.net/zSdsg/14/

would something like this be what your looking for?

#parent {
position: relative;
width: 300px;
height: 300px;
border: 1px dotted #000;
border-radius: 150px;
}

#child {
position: absolute;
width: 30px;
height: 30px;
background-color: #666;
}
#child2 {
position: absolute;
top:35px;
left:40px;
width: 30px;
height: 30px;
background-color: red;
    border-radius: 150px;
}

<div id="parent">
<div id="child"></div>
<div id="child2"></div>
</div>​
share|improve this answer
    
Mm, yeah, sorta, though the goal is to not have to manually discover and set all of the position values I need (as absolute pixel values, percentages, etc.), but rather just direct the div to a specific point along the circumference of the parent div. –  Aujury Aug 16 '12 at 4:26
    
ah, got it, not sure myself, but that is a great question. I suppose now to take it a step further, the idea would be to dynamically add the "locations" to create motion with JavaScript... –  bluelightning1 Aug 16 '12 at 23:45

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