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I see the following way of initializing a local pointer in almost every part of my code. want to understand the reason and intricacies in doing so.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
void initialize_p(char **p)
{
        char *p_local = NULL;
        p_local=malloc(6);
        strcpy(p_local,"sandy");
        *p = p_local;
}
int main(void)
{
        char *p = NULL;
        initialize_p(&p);
        printf("Name : %s\n",p);
        return 0;
}

It is just that, i am showing here with simple string. And in my actual code, it is being done using structures.

I kind of understand the above logic and also I don't. Please clear the concept involved in the above style of implementing. Also, let me know if there is any other better way of doing the same.

Please Enlighten .. :)

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I think, this code had nothing wrong. It is a usual practice, for instance vasprintf function working by using that trick –  CyberDem0n Aug 16 '12 at 4:48
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5 Answers

I'd probably return the newly allocated string instead of passing a pointer to a pointer as an argument:

char *initialize(void) {
    char *init = "sandy"; 
    char *ret = malloc(sizeof(init)+1);
    if (ret != NULL)
        strcpy(ret, init);
    return ret;
}

int main() {
    char *p = initialize();
    printf("Name: %s\n", p);
    free(p);
    return 0;
}
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ret is a local variable of initialize function right? In that case, how can i acces it from another function. After returning from initialize() function, ret may or may not be there in stack. Thats my understanding. Please correct me if wrong –  Manty Aug 16 '12 at 4:53
    
+1 -- but i think freeing p would be a good addition for somebody who's trying to understand how this all fits together. –  justin Aug 16 '12 at 4:55
    
@Sandy, When you call malloc, ret has memory residing on the heap. It doesn't die when the function ends. –  chris Aug 16 '12 at 5:05
    
@Sandy: ret itself is a local variable that will be destroyed during exit from the function. ret is a pointer though -- and most of what we care about is the memory it points at, not ret itself. The memory it points at was allocated with malloc, so it will remain until you call free with that same pointer. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 16 '12 at 13:43
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In initialize_p a chunk of memory is allocated and some string is copied into the memory. In order for the caller of initializer to get the address of this new chunk of memory the address of the pointer p is passed to initialize_p:

    char **p

         +---+---+---+---+---+----+
   *p -> | s | a | n | d | y | \0 |
         +---+---+---+---+---+----+

if only the *p would have been passed then setting the pointer inside the function would be the equivalent of:

void foo(int a)
{
  a=3;
  ...
}

a better way would be to use strdup which does the same thing as you do in your function

char* initialize_p()
{
   return strdup("sandy");
}

also make sure you free the string that is returned to avoid memory leak.

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I'd suggest you to create allocation and deallocation function pair

char *createP()
{
    char *p = NULL;
    p=malloc(6);
    strcpy(p,"sandy");
    return p;
}
void freeP(char *p)
{
    if (p) free(p);
}
int main(void)
{
    char *p = createP();
    printf("Name : %s\n",p);
    freeP(p);
    return 0;
}
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free(NULL) is, as far as I know, well defined and should not return an error or have any side effects. So, the deallocation does not need to check for the NULL value. –  HonkyTonk Aug 16 '12 at 8:57
    
@HonkyTonk If it is already NULL, why to waste an instruction? –  Manty Aug 23 '12 at 14:51
    
@Sandy When freeP gets called, the function does not know if p contains NULL or some other value. But since free can be called without checking for NULL, checking it is the unneeded/wasteful part of the code. –  HonkyTonk Aug 23 '12 at 16:55
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Clearing the concept? Well, in such a simple case I don't see the point in operating with byref output parameters - for me, object-oriented-like structure constructor functions are easier to understand if they work like this:

struct foo *bar = myobj_new(); // uses malloc and returns a pointer
// do something with bar
myobj_destroy(bar); // uses free

Some agree that this design is good because then the return value of the function can be used as an error/success code (have you seen SQLite3?), but I disagree. I think the primary, the most important result of a function should go through the return value, and not some auxiliary stuff. (I tend to write libraries in which failure is indicated by returning NULL and setting a byref-passed error code).

The only valid scenario I can think of is when it's more logical or symmetrical to pass arguments like this. For example, imagining a very strange sort function which is similar to the C stdlib function qsort(), but requires its comparison function itself to make the swapping of two elements when needed. The comparison function obviously needs byref access to its two parameters in order to exchange them, but it may also be useful to return the originally encountered order to the caller sort function in order to optimize the algorithm. So this comparison function could be something like:

int compare(void *a, void *b)
{
    int x = *(int *)a;
    int y = *(int *)b;

    if (x > y)
    {
        *(int *)a = y;
        *(int *)b = x;
        return +1;
    } else if (x < x) {
        return -1;
    }

    return 0;
}

Well, pretty much that's it about my opinion...

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it's an out-parameter. the function produces a result for you, and saves it to the parameter you pass. this is often used when the size of the result may vary, or if the type of the parameter is Opaque.

Personally, I think returning the result is much clearer, and is less error-prone when a dynamic allocation is required (as seen in JerryCoffin's answer +1).

when a dynamic allocation is not required, then pass it by reference (as a non-const parameter) if it is not trivially small:

struct t_struct { int a[100]; };

void InitStruct(struct t_struct* pStruct) {
  pStruct->a[0] = 11;
  ...
}

struct t_struct s;
void InitStruct(&s);

and if it is trivially small, you may consider returning by value.

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