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How can I get the current quarter we are in with javascript? I am trying to detect what quarter we are currently in, e.g. 2.

EDIT And how can I count the number of days left in the quarter?

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What are your criteria for quarter? In some cases, they are Jan to Dec, others Jul to Jun the following year, and so on. And they may not align with months. –  RobG Aug 16 '12 at 6:12
    
Approximate is fine, if it is a day off it isn't the end of the world, however if there is another way to get the current quarter without depending on the month that would be ideal. –  John Doe Aug 16 '12 at 6:14
    
This may help you [Stack answer with fiddle][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/a/20989200/2837412 –  Nishchit Dhanani Jan 8 at 7:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Given that you haven't provided any criteria for how to determine what quarter "*we are currently in", an algorithm can be suggested that you must then adapt to whatever criteria you need. e.g.

// For the US Government fiscal year
// Oct-Dec = 1
// Jan-Mar = 2
// Apr-Jun = 3
// Jul-Sep = 4
function getQuarter(d) {
  d = d || new Date();
  var m = Math.floor(d.getMonth()/3) + 2;
  return m > 4? m - 4 : m;
}

You can then adapt that to the various financial or calendar quarters as appropriate. You can also do:

function getQuarter(d) {
  d = d || new Date(); // If no date supplied, use today
  var q = [4,1,2,3];
  return q[Math.floor(d.getMonth() / 3)];
}

Then use different q arrays depending on the definition of quarter required.

Edit

The following gets the days remaining in a quarter if they start on 1 Jan, Apr, Jul and Oct, It's tested in various browsers, including IE 6 (though since it uses basic ECMAScript it should work everywhere):

function daysLeftInQuarter(d) {
  d = d || new Date();
  var qEnd = new Date(d);
  qEnd.setMonth(qEnd.getMonth() + 3 - qEnd.getMonth() % 3, 0);
  return Math.floor((qEnd - d) / 8.64e7);
}
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I keep getting output - $NaN –  John Doe Aug 16 '12 at 14:34
    
$NaN? I have no idea how you get that, the code above is tested in Firefox and IE 9, it's plain ECMAScript so has nothing to do with jQuery. All of it should work in nearly every browser that ever supported javascript, certainly everything since and including IE and NN 4. –  RobG Aug 17 '12 at 2:29
    
yeah yeah it's cool it was an issue with ie 6, and sadly the client I'm building this for can't "upgrade" to like chrome or something. –  John Doe Aug 17 '12 at 15:59
    
Your daysleftInquarter example isn't correct, it keeps returning 60 when I pass the current month –  John Doe Aug 17 '12 at 16:32
    
@Pete—should be ok now. –  RobG Aug 18 '12 at 12:35

Assuming January through March are considered Q1 (some countries/companies separate their financial year from their calendar year), the following code should work:

var today = new Date();
var quarter = Math.floor((today.getMonth() + 3) / 3);

This gives you:

Month      getMonth()  quarter
---------  ----------  -------
January         0         1
February        1         1
March           2         1
April           3         2
May             4         2
June            5         2
July            6         3
August          7         3
September       8         3
October         9         4
November       10         4
December       11         4

As to how to get the days remaining in the quarter, it's basically figuring out the first day of the next quarter and working out the difference, something like:

var today = new Date();
var quarter = Math.floor((today.getMonth() + 3) / 3);
var nextq;
if (quarter == 4) {
    nextq = new Date (today.getFullYear() + 1, 1, 1);
} else {
    nextq = new Date (today.getFullYear(), quarter * 3, 1);
}
var millis1 = today.getTime();
var millis2 = nextq.getTime();
var daydiff = (millis2 - millis1) / 1000 / 60 / 60 / 24;

That's untested but the theory is sound. Basically create a date corresponding to the next quarter, convert it and today into milliseconds since the start of the epoch, then the difference is the number of milliseconds.

Divide that by the number of milliseconds in a day and you have the difference in days.

That gives you (at least roughly) number of days left in the quarter. You may need to fine-tune it to ensure all times are set to the same value (00:00:00) so that the difference is in exact days.

It may also be off by one, depending on your actual definition of "days left in the quarter".

But it should be a good starting point.

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Given that the OP thinks August is in Q2, it is unlikely January to March is Q1. A hard coded solution works though. –  RobG Aug 16 '12 at 6:36
    
@Rob, I saw the example 2 as just being a quarter we could be in. I don't think the OP is stating that it corresponds to the current month when this question was asked (August). –  paxdiablo Aug 16 '12 at 6:48
    
Surely you need a Math.floor around your result to get the quarter? Also there is no variable called "now", I guess you meant to use "today" instead? –  lee_mcmullen Oct 16 '13 at 8:42
1  
@lee_mcmullen, hence the "untested" comment :-) Congrats on being the first person to pick up the today/now error in over a year, have fixed both issues based on your suggestions. –  paxdiablo Oct 16 '13 at 8:53
    
@paxdiablo Looks good now, upvoted. –  lee_mcmullen Oct 16 '13 at 9:50

if the first solution doesn't work than you can just adjust it to the range you would like

var today = new Date();
var month = now.getMonth();
var quarter;
if (month < 4)
  quarter = 1;
else if (month < 7)
  quarter = 2;
else if (month < 10)
  quarter = 3;
else if (month < 13)
  quarter = 4;
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Depend on month

 var date = new Date();     
 var quarter =  parseInt(date.getMonth() / 3 ) + 1 ;

Depend on Date

 var date = new Date();    
 var firstday = new Date(date.getFullYear(),0,1); // XXXX/01/01
 var diff = Math.ceil((date - firstday) / 86400000); 
 // a quarter is about 365/4 
 quarter =  parseInt( diff / ( 365/ 4 )) + 1 
 // if today is 2012/01/01, the value of quarter  is  1.
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So there is a quarter zero? –  RobG Aug 16 '12 at 6:07
    
Jan to March -> 0 –  Shih-En Chou Aug 16 '12 at 6:08

It's not efficient or readable but it's in oneliner flavour.

(new Date(new Date().getFullYear(), Math.floor((new Date().getMonth() + 3) / 3) * 3, 1) - new Date()) / 86400000
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